2016 CADN Graduate Student Conference: #Trending: Mobilizing Art and Culture


2016 CADN Graduate Student Conference

 
DateFriday, March 11, 2016 - 8:00am to 10:00pm

Website

http://cadnconferenceocadu.blogspot.ca/

Location

100 McCaul, Auditorium 190 & Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond OCAD University

#TRENDING: MOBILIZING ART AND CULTURE

The influence of trends is undeniable in contemporary culture, but rarely are its implications fully fleshed out. How can a trend mobilize or call others to action? As scholarship in contemporary art, design and new media becomes increasingly focused on networked lives, the digital platforms through which we communicate, interact, and share information demand academic and social inquiry. This interdisciplinary conference looks to the topic of #trending in its myriad meanings as it produces and affects subjects and citizenship, social and political change, visual and material culture. We must consider the longevity, impact, and relevancy of cultural work and research as the implications of cultural trends, their makers, and media are nuanced and complex. Are trends disposable or lasting? How should scholarship respond to trends -- by defining them or following them? What can trends tell us in their sequencing, forecasting, and analysis?

100 McCaul, Auditorium 190

OCAD University

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Free registration at 100 McCaul

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Opening Remarks

Conference Organizer Treva Pullen (CADN)

Dr. Robert Diaz (FoLAS/SIS)

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM

Conscious Fringes: Trends from Ends to Edges

Mark Dudiak, Marc de Pape, John-Patrick Ayson

Moderated by Treva Pullen

Geographical, ideological and cultural ‘fringes’ having shaped much of the twenty-first century’s speculative imaginary and its imagery. Philosophy, art and design have experienced a bursting open of ontological parameters and a surge towards hybridized methodologies. The digitized space of the Internet, which has powerfully influenced these trends is also considered to be a space without border or periphery, where the ‘fringe,’ practices and ideologies of the analog world are able to blossom. This panel looks at such peripheral philosophies and art forms: flickering post-human ontologies, new-media sound art, and tomb design.

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Selfies, Self-Care, Socializing: Constructing and Deconstructing the Online Self

Sophie Bishop, Estelle Wathieu, Lauren Fournier, Margeaux Feldman, Jenna-Lee Forde

Moderated by Andrea Pelletier

Social media provides many tools for constructing digitized yet fully formed online selves. With an influx of self-photographing, self-documenting and self-surveillence technologies, to what extent are our digital avatars both genuine and constructed? How are these identities formed and what are the implications of this online performativity? Responding to questions of age, gender, privacy and beauty through examining artists such as Petra Collins, YouTube make-up tutorials and the discursive trend towards ‘self care,’ this panel looks at how these new considerations of the ‘self’ are affecting visual culture.

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM – 2:00 PM

Performance: First Things First

Christopher Lacroix, afallenhorse

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

The Word Made Digital

Fan Wu, Mary C. Baumstark, Merray Gerges

Moderated by Katie Connell

As communication via devices becomes ubiquitous, the notion that ‘words are sacred’ is increasingly both a cliché and an untruth. This panel is designed to trouble this notion through interrogating the influence of new media on writing and speaking. With a publishing industry in upheaval, as well as online dissemination of philosophy and viral sharing, writing can be metareflective of these shifts. Words, and our ability to choose the right ones, are extremely important to us when expressing and asserting ourselves in moments of both marginalization and empowerment.

3:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Performance and Solidarity

Barbora Racevičiūtė, Victor Arroyo, Lina El-Shamy, Alina Tigountsova

Moderated by Dr. Robert Diaz

News spreads rapidly and in myriad forms of new media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and blogs are but a few deterritorialized news sources. Additionally, these online forums have become critical sites for the proliferation and explosion of both grass roots activism and international movements. #BlackLivesMatter, #IdleNoMore, #KillBillC51 and the Syrian refugee crisis have taken shape on social media, organizing and inspiring pivotal protests amongst bodies in public spaces. Yet social media has also resulted in both corporatized activism and what has been popularly decried as ‘slacktivism’ – an online attendance to politically charged protests, marches and gartherings that is not physically carried out. This panel interrogates the digital sides of activism, hegemony and the popular media responding to it: surveillance technologies, television and hashtags.

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Keynote Speaker: Janaya Khan

Opening remarks from Dr. Andrea Fatona (CADN)

Janaya Khan, known as Future in the Black Lives Matter movement, is a black, queer, gender-nonconforming activist, staunch Afrofuturist, social-justice educator and boxer based in Toronto. As the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto, they are committed to black liberation, transformative justice and indigenous sovereignty and operate through a black transfeminist lens. They have previously been featured in the Feminist Wire and RaceBaitR and can be found shutting it down at an action near you.

7:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Reception

#nature: Artwork by featured artist Sean Martindale

OCADU Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond

Sean Martindale is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary artist and designer based in Toronto. His interventions activate public and semi-public spaces in order to encourage engagement, often focused on ecological and social issues. His playful works question and suggest alternate possibilities for existing spaces, infrastructures and materials found in urban environments. Frequently, Martindale uses salvaged goods and live plants in unexpected ways that prompt conversations and interaction.    Martindale has taken part in multiple solo and group exhibitions, and his projects have been shown in cities such as across Canada as well as in Madrid, New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Shenszhen, Venice, Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool, Oxford, London, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Paris, Angers, Brussels, Berlin and Doha. In 2013, he was the lead artist on the tallest mural in the world, the result of a community project in St James Town, Toronto, with local youth, STEPS and the Toronto Muralists. Sean has continued to lead other notable community arts projects, and has been awarded the 2012 Artist Prize by the Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts.

The 2016 CADN Graduate Conference at OCAD U is dedicated to the perspectives of emerging scholars. The interdisciplinary all-ages conference will promote an open space for dialogue about the art historical, socio-cultural and political trends of the contemporary moment. We hope to foster a welcoming atmosphere that takes into account accessibility, privilege and sustainability thereby encouraging not only inventive and radical conversations during the conference but future collaborations continuing the trend of giving voice to new and exciting ideas.

DateFriday, March 11, 2016 - 8:00am to 10:00pm

Website

http://cadnconferenceocadu.blogspot.ca/

Location

100 McCaul, Auditorium 190 & Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond OCAD University

Integrated Media instructor Cliff Caines’ latest film Workhorse will have its world premiere at the 2019 RIDM - Montreal International Documentary Festival.
A fun chance to make a pin and unwind as the fall semester draws to a close! 
Students and faculty from the Design Abroad: Costa Rica course invite you to attend the Design Abroad Exhibition.
Contemporary Exhibit Design students in Bev Dywan’s class are creating installations about identity at the ROM for one night only. 
Art + Practice Workshops: PHOTOGRAPHY with Ruth Kaplan
Hints, tips, find roommates, information and services...
Come and learn more about this tool so that you can spend less time on accounting and more time doing the work you love.
"While honey bees get most of the credit, a considerable amount of agricultural pollination is performed by wild bees. In Toronto, backyard fruits and vegetables are pollinated mostly by wild bees. So, it is a good thing that there are over 350 species living within the GTA" - Bees of Toronto: A Guide to their Remarkable World, City of Toronto
Join artist Pamila Matharu for a screening of stuck between an archive and an aesthetic followed by a conversation between the artist and Gabrielle Moser about the generation of this work. 
Join us for a film screening of The Fifth Region, followed by a conversation with filmmaker Aeyliya Husain and film subjects Nancy Saunders and Joshua Stribbell.
#trending: mobilizing art and culture
#nature: Artwork by featured artist Sean Martindale
#nature: Artwork by featured artist Sean Martindale
Friday, March 11, 2016 - 8:00am to 10:00pm

#TRENDING: MOBILIZING ART AND CULTURE

The influence of trends is undeniable in contemporary culture, but rarely are its implications fully fleshed out. How can a trend mobilize or call others to action? As scholarship in contemporary art, design and new media becomes increasingly focused on networked lives, the digital platforms through which we communicate, interact, and share information demand academic and social inquiry. This interdisciplinary conference looks to the topic of #trending in its myriad meanings as it produces and affects subjects and citizenship, social and political change, visual and material culture. We must consider the longevity, impact, and relevancy of cultural work and research as the implications of cultural trends, their makers, and media are nuanced and complex. Are trends disposable or lasting? How should scholarship respond to trends -- by defining them or following them? What can trends tell us in their sequencing, forecasting, and analysis?

100 McCaul, Auditorium 190

OCAD University

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Free registration at 100 McCaul

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Opening Remarks

Conference Organizer Treva Pullen (CADN)

Dr. Robert Diaz (FoLAS/SIS)

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM

Conscious Fringes: Trends from Ends to Edges

Mark Dudiak, Marc de Pape, John-Patrick Ayson

Moderated by Treva Pullen

Geographical, ideological and cultural ‘fringes’ having shaped much of the twenty-first century’s speculative imaginary and its imagery. Philosophy, art and design have experienced a bursting open of ontological parameters and a surge towards hybridized methodologies. The digitized space of the Internet, which has powerfully influenced these trends is also considered to be a space without border or periphery, where the ‘fringe,’ practices and ideologies of the analog world are able to blossom. This panel looks at such peripheral philosophies and art forms: flickering post-human ontologies, new-media sound art, and tomb design.

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Selfies, Self-Care, Socializing: Constructing and Deconstructing the Online Self

Sophie Bishop, Estelle Wathieu, Lauren Fournier, Margeaux Feldman, Jenna-Lee Forde

Moderated by Andrea Pelletier

Social media provides many tools for constructing digitized yet fully formed online selves. With an influx of self-photographing, self-documenting and self-surveillence technologies, to what extent are our digital avatars both genuine and constructed? How are these identities formed and what are the implications of this online performativity? Responding to questions of age, gender, privacy and beauty through examining artists such as Petra Collins, YouTube make-up tutorials and the discursive trend towards ‘self care,’ this panel looks at how these new considerations of the ‘self’ are affecting visual culture.

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM – 2:00 PM

Performance: First Things First

Christopher Lacroix, afallenhorse

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

The Word Made Digital

Fan Wu, Mary C. Baumstark, Merray Gerges

Moderated by Katie Connell

As communication via devices becomes ubiquitous, the notion that ‘words are sacred’ is increasingly both a cliché and an untruth. This panel is designed to trouble this notion through interrogating the influence of new media on writing and speaking. With a publishing industry in upheaval, as well as online dissemination of philosophy and viral sharing, writing can be metareflective of these shifts. Words, and our ability to choose the right ones, are extremely important to us when expressing and asserting ourselves in moments of both marginalization and empowerment.

3:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Performance and Solidarity

Barbora Racevičiūtė, Victor Arroyo, Lina El-Shamy, Alina Tigountsova

Moderated by Dr. Robert Diaz

News spreads rapidly and in myriad forms of new media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and blogs are but a few deterritorialized news sources. Additionally, these online forums have become critical sites for the proliferation and explosion of both grass roots activism and international movements. #BlackLivesMatter, #IdleNoMore, #KillBillC51 and the Syrian refugee crisis have taken shape on social media, organizing and inspiring pivotal protests amongst bodies in public spaces. Yet social media has also resulted in both corporatized activism and what has been popularly decried as ‘slacktivism’ – an online attendance to politically charged protests, marches and gartherings that is not physically carried out. This panel interrogates the digital sides of activism, hegemony and the popular media responding to it: surveillance technologies, television and hashtags.

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Keynote Speaker: Janaya Khan

Opening remarks from Dr. Andrea Fatona (CADN)

Janaya Khan, known as Future in the Black Lives Matter movement, is a black, queer, gender-nonconforming activist, staunch Afrofuturist, social-justice educator and boxer based in Toronto. As the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto, they are committed to black liberation, transformative justice and indigenous sovereignty and operate through a black transfeminist lens. They have previously been featured in the Feminist Wire and RaceBaitR and can be found shutting it down at an action near you.

7:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Reception

#nature: Artwork by featured artist Sean Martindale

OCADU Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond

Sean Martindale is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary artist and designer based in Toronto. His interventions activate public and semi-public spaces in order to encourage engagement, often focused on ecological and social issues. His playful works question and suggest alternate possibilities for existing spaces, infrastructures and materials found in urban environments. Frequently, Martindale uses salvaged goods and live plants in unexpected ways that prompt conversations and interaction.    Martindale has taken part in multiple solo and group exhibitions, and his projects have been shown in cities such as across Canada as well as in Madrid, New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Shenszhen, Venice, Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool, Oxford, London, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Paris, Angers, Brussels, Berlin and Doha. In 2013, he was the lead artist on the tallest mural in the world, the result of a community project in St James Town, Toronto, with local youth, STEPS and the Toronto Muralists. Sean has continued to lead other notable community arts projects, and has been awarded the 2012 Artist Prize by the Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts.

The 2016 CADN Graduate Conference at OCAD U is dedicated to the perspectives of emerging scholars. The interdisciplinary all-ages conference will promote an open space for dialogue about the art historical, socio-cultural and political trends of the contemporary moment. We hope to foster a welcoming atmosphere that takes into account accessibility, privilege and sustainability thereby encouraging not only inventive and radical conversations during the conference but future collaborations continuing the trend of giving voice to new and exciting ideas.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul, Auditorium 190 & Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond OCAD University
Website: 
http://cadnconferenceocadu.blogspot.ca/
Ignite Imagination - The Campaign for OCAD U

Please be advised that OCAD U hosted events may be documented through photographs and video. These images may be used by the University for promotional, advertising, and educational purposes. By participating in our events, both on campus and off-site, you consent to allowing OCAD University to document and use your image and likeness. However, if you do not want us to use a photo or video of you or your child, please don’t hesitate to let us know when you arrive at the event. You’re also welcome to get in touch with OCAD University’s Marketing & Communications office: communications@ocadu.ca.

Be mindful of those in our community who have scent sensitivities; please help OCAD U maintain a healthy, scent-free campus.