Conversations About Indigenous Visual Culture Wampum: Language and Symbol


Considering the visual language, materials and agreements encoded in wampum, this talk brings together historians, curators and artists for a discussion of treaties between Indigenous nations.

 
DateSaturday, February 8, 2014 - 5:00pm to 10:00pm

Cost

Free

Location

Central Hall 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario

Saturday February 8th, 2014

12 noon to 5 pm
OCAD University
100 McCaul Street
Room 230, 2nd Floor
FREE

Presented by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program.

Considering the visual language, materials and agreements encoded in wampum, this talk brings together historians, curators and artists for a discussion of treaties between Indigenous nations.

Alan Ojiig Corbiere is an Ojibwe Anishnaabe from the M’Chigeeng First Nation on Manitoulin Island. He earned his Masters of Environmental Studies at York University where he focused on Anishnaabe narratives and their role in Anishnaabe language revitalization. He served five years as the Executive Director of the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation which included roles as the Curator, Historian and Cultural programmer. During his time at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, he extensively researched the Anishinaabe material culture, history and art. Alan has recorded numerous elders and has conducted archival research in his efforts to synthesis an Anishnaabe cultural history. He is currently the Program Coordinator for the Anishinaabemowin Revitalization Program at Lakeview Elementary School in M'Chigeeng.

Rick Hill (Tuscarora) is an artist, writer and curator who lives at the Six Nations Community of the Grand River Territory in Ontario, Canada. Over the years, Rick has served as the Manager of the Indian Art Centre, Ottawa, Ontario; Director of the Indian Museum at the Institute of American Arts in Santa Fe, NM; and the Assistant Director for Public Programs at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; and Manager of the Haudenosaunee Resource Center. Currently he is the Coordinator for the Joint Stewardship Board at Six Nations to develop an environmental interpretation centre and is the manager of the Six Nations Virtual Archives Project.

Bonnie Devine, a member of the Serpent River First Nation of Ontario (Ojibwa) is an installation artist, curator, writer and educator. History and narrative have been and remain a compelling focus of her work. They inform her art practice, teaching career, and her work as an independent curator. Her art is about the stories of the Anishinaabek- the voices that tell them, the bodies that carry them and the land that birthed them. Devine’s drawings, videos, sculptures, and installations have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, the US, and Europe. She is an Associate Professor and the Founding Chair of the Indigenous Visual Culture program at OCAD University. She lives and works in Toronto, Ontario.

DateSaturday, February 8, 2014 - 5:00pm to 10:00pm

Cost

Free

Website Location

Central Hall 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario

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Saturday, February 8, 2014 - 5:00pm to 10:00pm

Saturday February 8th, 2014

12 noon to 5 pm
OCAD University
100 McCaul Street
Room 230, 2nd Floor
FREE

Presented by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program.

Considering the visual language, materials and agreements encoded in wampum, this talk brings together historians, curators and artists for a discussion of treaties between Indigenous nations.

Alan Ojiig Corbiere is an Ojibwe Anishnaabe from the M’Chigeeng First Nation on Manitoulin Island. He earned his Masters of Environmental Studies at York University where he focused on Anishnaabe narratives and their role in Anishnaabe language revitalization. He served five years as the Executive Director of the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation which included roles as the Curator, Historian and Cultural programmer. During his time at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, he extensively researched the Anishinaabe material culture, history and art. Alan has recorded numerous elders and has conducted archival research in his efforts to synthesis an Anishnaabe cultural history. He is currently the Program Coordinator for the Anishinaabemowin Revitalization Program at Lakeview Elementary School in M'Chigeeng.

Rick Hill (Tuscarora) is an artist, writer and curator who lives at the Six Nations Community of the Grand River Territory in Ontario, Canada. Over the years, Rick has served as the Manager of the Indian Art Centre, Ottawa, Ontario; Director of the Indian Museum at the Institute of American Arts in Santa Fe, NM; and the Assistant Director for Public Programs at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; and Manager of the Haudenosaunee Resource Center. Currently he is the Coordinator for the Joint Stewardship Board at Six Nations to develop an environmental interpretation centre and is the manager of the Six Nations Virtual Archives Project.

Bonnie Devine, a member of the Serpent River First Nation of Ontario (Ojibwa) is an installation artist, curator, writer and educator. History and narrative have been and remain a compelling focus of her work. They inform her art practice, teaching career, and her work as an independent curator. Her art is about the stories of the Anishinaabek- the voices that tell them, the bodies that carry them and the land that birthed them. Devine’s drawings, videos, sculptures, and installations have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, the US, and Europe. She is an Associate Professor and the Founding Chair of the Indigenous Visual Culture program at OCAD University. She lives and works in Toronto, Ontario.

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free
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