Global Indigeneity: De-Colonialization, Reconciliation, & Issues of Appropriation


This symposium features a presentation by speaker Nadia McLaren, Indigenous artist and educational developer, OCADU and a gallery tour facilitated by artist and AGO art educator Paula Gonzales-Ossa with the intention of de/re-constructing knowledges and energizing our communities around teaching and learning.

 
DateTuesday, February 12, 2019 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Cost

Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities

Location

Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario Toronto, ON

OCAD U/AGO Art Education Learning Partnership Symposium:   Global Indigeneity: De-Colonialization, Reconciliation, & Issues of Appropriation

Feb 12, 12:00 - 2pm Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario

Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities

Art & Design Education Lab: AGO, a collaborative cross-disciplinary course co-facilitated in partnership between the AGO and OCADU, has, over the last decade, presented a number of symposia with the intention of de/re-constructing knowledges and energizing our communities around teaching and learning. This symposium features a presentation by speaker Nadia McLaren, Indigenous artist and educational developer, OCADU and a gallery tour facilitated by artist and AGO art educator Paula Gonzales-Ossa. Please join us for this free event in the Weston Family Learning Centre Seminar Room at the AGO.

Nadia McLaren

Nadia is an Anishnaabe whose family roots are in Heron Bay, Pic River located on the North Shore of Lake Superior. She grew up in small towns across Northwestern Ontario and calls Sioux Lookout home. Nadia is a mother of two, a Drawing and Painting graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design, a published author and is currently finishing a graphic novel entitled, “Ever Good,” which was awarded a grant from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a project of commemoration.

As Educational Developer (Indigenous Learning), Nadia brings deep knowledge and experience in the areas of Indigenous pedagogy, professional development and community engagement to her work. Nadia is an accomplished educator, artist and storyteller with more than 15 years’ experience working in Indigenous educational contexts. She is also the creator (writer/director/producer) of an award-winning documentary, “Muffins for Granny,” (Mongrel Media 2007). This documentary involved extensive research with community Elders and residential school survivors, was the recipient of a prestigious Aboriginal Healing Foundation grant and is part of the esteemed Criterion Collection.

Paula Gonzalez-Ossa is a visual arts instructor and mentoring artist at Na Me Res Sagatay Native Men's Residence. She has had 17 years of experience as a Community Youth Worker with youth at risk in Toronto's West. She is also a mural artist who has been working with many communities producing street level public art, both in Canada and Latin America for over 25 years. Her works, like the most recent 500 ft. mural titled "Our Medicines", located at the underpass at Dupont and Shaw, or "The Ancestral Tree Spirits" located at the Nordheimer Ravine's TTC station exit, depict a colourful First Nations cosmovision in relation to the Original lands of Ontario. She worked closely in creating this work with Anishnawbe mentors, Elders and Knowledge Keepers. She is currently developing a documentary about public art and protocol in the use of Ancestral Images for the City of Toronto's StART program. Gonzalez-Ossa is originally from Talca, Chile, and is now based in Toronto.  

 

DateTuesday, February 12, 2019 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Cost

Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities

Website Location

Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario Toronto, ON

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Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

OCAD U/AGO Art Education Learning Partnership Symposium:   Global Indigeneity: De-Colonialization, Reconciliation, & Issues of Appropriation

Feb 12, 12:00 - 2pm Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario

Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities

Art & Design Education Lab: AGO, a collaborative cross-disciplinary course co-facilitated in partnership between the AGO and OCADU, has, over the last decade, presented a number of symposia with the intention of de/re-constructing knowledges and energizing our communities around teaching and learning. This symposium features a presentation by speaker Nadia McLaren, Indigenous artist and educational developer, OCADU and a gallery tour facilitated by artist and AGO art educator Paula Gonzales-Ossa. Please join us for this free event in the Weston Family Learning Centre Seminar Room at the AGO.

Nadia McLaren

Nadia is an Anishnaabe whose family roots are in Heron Bay, Pic River located on the North Shore of Lake Superior. She grew up in small towns across Northwestern Ontario and calls Sioux Lookout home. Nadia is a mother of two, a Drawing and Painting graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design, a published author and is currently finishing a graphic novel entitled, “Ever Good,” which was awarded a grant from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a project of commemoration.

As Educational Developer (Indigenous Learning), Nadia brings deep knowledge and experience in the areas of Indigenous pedagogy, professional development and community engagement to her work. Nadia is an accomplished educator, artist and storyteller with more than 15 years’ experience working in Indigenous educational contexts. She is also the creator (writer/director/producer) of an award-winning documentary, “Muffins for Granny,” (Mongrel Media 2007). This documentary involved extensive research with community Elders and residential school survivors, was the recipient of a prestigious Aboriginal Healing Foundation grant and is part of the esteemed Criterion Collection.

Paula Gonzalez-Ossa is a visual arts instructor and mentoring artist at Na Me Res Sagatay Native Men's Residence. She has had 17 years of experience as a Community Youth Worker with youth at risk in Toronto's West. She is also a mural artist who has been working with many communities producing street level public art, both in Canada and Latin America for over 25 years. Her works, like the most recent 500 ft. mural titled "Our Medicines", located at the underpass at Dupont and Shaw, or "The Ancestral Tree Spirits" located at the Nordheimer Ravine's TTC station exit, depict a colourful First Nations cosmovision in relation to the Original lands of Ontario. She worked closely in creating this work with Anishnawbe mentors, Elders and Knowledge Keepers. She is currently developing a documentary about public art and protocol in the use of Ancestral Images for the City of Toronto's StART program. Gonzalez-Ossa is originally from Talca, Chile, and is now based in Toronto.  

 

Venue & Address: 
Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario Toronto, ON
Cost: 
Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities
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