ORGS Faculty Talk: Ryan Whyte


Art History for Women: Art, Fashion, and Subversion in Napoleonic France

 
DateWednesday, March 25, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

Phone

416-977-6000 ext. 474

Cost

Free

Email

vly@ocadu.ca

Location

100 McCaul Street, Room 187

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RYAN WHYTE
Recipient of the 2013-2014 OCAD University Award for Excellence in Early Stage Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity
"Art History for Women: Art, Fashion, and Subversion in Napoleonic France"

During the First French Empire (1804¬-14/15) women encountered art inside objects of fashion. Specifically, women’s pocket-sized literary almanacs included reproductions of and commentary on canonical artworks. Fashionably bound and worn on the person, they transformed the space of fashion into a zone of spectatorship within which women operated as equivalent to their male counterparts as authors, subjects of art, critics, and audiences. In a period when state policy and ideology divided art from fashion and women from art, women’s almanacs were subversive because their scale changed the space of reception, and their use appropriated female fashion as an arena for the display of and commentary on art.

Bio:
Dr. Whyte's research reveals legacies of eighteenth-century art and culture that are commonplace in and relevant to the early twenty-first century. He is currently writing a book on the role of printed matter in the Salon du Louvre exhibitions of the Ancien Régime; a second research project explores the visual culture of gastronomy in 18th- and 19th-century France. His other recent work addresses fashion, materiality, and cross-cultural exchange in eighteenth-century print culture. He has also written art criticism and essays for journals that include Artext, Artichoke, Border Crossings, C Magazine, Lola, New Observations, and Parachute.

DateWednesday, March 25, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

Phone

416-977-6000 ext. 474

Cost

Free

Email

vly@ocadu.ca

Website Location

100 McCaul Street, Room 187

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

RYAN WHYTE
Recipient of the 2013-2014 OCAD University Award for Excellence in Early Stage Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity
"Art History for Women: Art, Fashion, and Subversion in Napoleonic France"

During the First French Empire (1804¬-14/15) women encountered art inside objects of fashion. Specifically, women’s pocket-sized literary almanacs included reproductions of and commentary on canonical artworks. Fashionably bound and worn on the person, they transformed the space of fashion into a zone of spectatorship within which women operated as equivalent to their male counterparts as authors, subjects of art, critics, and audiences. In a period when state policy and ideology divided art from fashion and women from art, women’s almanacs were subversive because their scale changed the space of reception, and their use appropriated female fashion as an arena for the display of and commentary on art.

Bio:
Dr. Whyte's research reveals legacies of eighteenth-century art and culture that are commonplace in and relevant to the early twenty-first century. He is currently writing a book on the role of printed matter in the Salon du Louvre exhibitions of the Ancien Régime; a second research project explores the visual culture of gastronomy in 18th- and 19th-century France. His other recent work addresses fashion, materiality, and cross-cultural exchange in eighteenth-century print culture. He has also written art criticism and essays for journals that include Artext, Artichoke, Border Crossings, C Magazine, Lola, New Observations, and Parachute.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street, Room 187
Email: 
vly@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 ext. 474
Cost: 
Free
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