Symposium: SOUTHERN SCENE - Inuit Disenchantment


ndigenous Visual Culture’s annual Fall symposium will draw attention to Inuit artists who live and practice in the "south”

 
DateTuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Email

<p>rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca</p>

Website

http://www.facebook.com/events/1471874093109467

Location

Open Space Gallery Meeting Room 51 McCaul St 

Indigenous Visual Culture’s annual Fall symposium will draw attention to Inuit artists who live and practice in the "south” as they are forgotten or deleted from the conversation and discourse around Inuit Art and ‘northern’ expectations. Dr. Heather Igloliorte will discuss and introduce the issue and lead a conversation between the panelists including Barry Pottle, Beth Kotierk, Geronimo Inutiq and Britt Gallpen.

Keynote and Moderator:

Heather Igloliorte is a Concordia University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement and an Assistant Professor of Indigenous art history from Nunatsiavut, Labrador, who resides in Montreal. Heather's teaching and research interests center on Inuit and other Native North American visual and material culture, circumpolar art studies, performance and new media art, the global exhibition of Indigenous arts and culture, and issues of colonization, sovereignty, resistance, resilience and resurgence. 

Panelists:

Beth Kotierk was born in Iqaluit, Nunavut and grew up in Ottawa. She studied Sculpture and Installation and Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University. In 2009, she was awarded the inaugural Norval Morriseau Fine Arts Bursary. Today her work is multi-disciplinary ranging from performance, video, painting to design.

Barry Pottle is an emerging Inuk artist from Nunatsiavut in Labrador (Rigolet), now living in Ottawa. He has worked in and with the Ontario Aboriginal arts community for many years. He believes that the concept of Urban Inuit is relatively new and for the most part unexplored (compared to other Urban Aboriginal groups in Canada). As an emerging artist, he is trying give voice and reality to this concept. 

Geronimo Inutiq considers himself amongst other things a self-taught and independent electronic & electro-acoustic musician, and multi-media artist. Having been exposed to strong traditional Inuit cultural elements in his youth, as well as the exciting worlds of modern art, and broadcast & media. Through close members of his kin, he has been able to weave those reference points into his practice.

Britt Gallpen is a critic and emerging curator based in Toronto, Canada. She is currently completing an M.A. in Art History at York University, specializing in contemporary Canadian art and curatorial studies. Her current project includes the Arctic Noise Project. http://www.arcticnoiseproject.com/

Image: Idle No More by Barry Pottle
 

DateTuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Email

rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca

Website

http://www.facebook.com/events/1471874093109467

Location

Open Space Gallery Meeting Room 51 McCaul St 

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Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Indigenous Visual Culture’s annual Fall symposium will draw attention to Inuit artists who live and practice in the "south” as they are forgotten or deleted from the conversation and discourse around Inuit Art and ‘northern’ expectations. Dr. Heather Igloliorte will discuss and introduce the issue and lead a conversation between the panelists including Barry Pottle, Beth Kotierk, Geronimo Inutiq and Britt Gallpen.

Keynote and Moderator:

Heather Igloliorte is a Concordia University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement and an Assistant Professor of Indigenous art history from Nunatsiavut, Labrador, who resides in Montreal. Heather's teaching and research interests center on Inuit and other Native North American visual and material culture, circumpolar art studies, performance and new media art, the global exhibition of Indigenous arts and culture, and issues of colonization, sovereignty, resistance, resilience and resurgence. 

Panelists:

Beth Kotierk was born in Iqaluit, Nunavut and grew up in Ottawa. She studied Sculpture and Installation and Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University. In 2009, she was awarded the inaugural Norval Morriseau Fine Arts Bursary. Today her work is multi-disciplinary ranging from performance, video, painting to design.

Barry Pottle is an emerging Inuk artist from Nunatsiavut in Labrador (Rigolet), now living in Ottawa. He has worked in and with the Ontario Aboriginal arts community for many years. He believes that the concept of Urban Inuit is relatively new and for the most part unexplored (compared to other Urban Aboriginal groups in Canada). As an emerging artist, he is trying give voice and reality to this concept. 

Geronimo Inutiq considers himself amongst other things a self-taught and independent electronic & electro-acoustic musician, and multi-media artist. Having been exposed to strong traditional Inuit cultural elements in his youth, as well as the exciting worlds of modern art, and broadcast & media. Through close members of his kin, he has been able to weave those reference points into his practice.

Britt Gallpen is a critic and emerging curator based in Toronto, Canada. She is currently completing an M.A. in Art History at York University, specializing in contemporary Canadian art and curatorial studies. Her current project includes the Arctic Noise Project. http://www.arcticnoiseproject.com/

Image: Idle No More by Barry Pottle
 

Venue & Address: 
Open Space Gallery Meeting Room 51 McCaul St&nbsp;
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/events/1471874093109467
Email: 
<p>rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca</p>
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