The Clichettes represent 1985 in 150 Years| 150 Works


150 Years | 150 Works: Canadian Art as Historical Act brings together the work of more than 150 artists in a brand new virtual exhibition to be online for the next five years. The Clichettes will represent 1985 with their lip-sync video performance Go to Hell.  Composed of Louise Garfield, Janice Hladki and Johanna Householder, The Clichettes used pop culture clichés, combined with brash humour, to contest gender stereotypes. 

 

150 YEARS | 150 WORKS: CANADIAN ART AS HISTORICAL ACT

On May 2, Galerie de l’UQAM will launch its brand new virtual exhibition. Three years in the making, 150 Years | 150 Works: Canadian Art as Historical Act brings together the work of more than 150 artists and will be online for the next five years. The Clichettes will represent 1985 with their lip-sync video performance Go to Hell

Go to Hell is a lip-sync performance* of the 1982 song of the same name by the English rock band Motörhead. Here, the all-woman Clichettes are costumed in anatomically correct male bodysuits complete with six-pack abs and genitalia. Armed with fake guitars, they are parodying the macho posturing of “cock-rock” bands. By spoofing the gestures of those musicians and lip-syncing their lyrics, The Clichettes were hilariously denouncing the contrived affectations of male stars.

The Toronto-based satirical performance group The Clichettes made their debut in 1978. Composed of Louise Garfield, Janice Hladki and Johanna Householder, the trio voiced strong feminist and political views in lip-synced renditions of popular songs. As the name suggests, The Clichettes used pop culture clichés, combined with brash humour, to contest gender stereotypes. In 1984, they won the National Lip-Sync Championships in Houston, Texas. The group disbanded in 1992.

Direction: Louise Déry
Curation and coordination: Josée Desforges

Online starting May 2, 2018
150ans150oeuvres.uqam.ca

The virtual exhibition 150 Years | 150 Works: Canadian Art as Historical Act presents art as an integral part of Canada’s social and political history. It looks at Canada through works that have in some way shaped or changed the country’s history over the past century and a half.

Most but not all of the works in this panorama are presented according to their year of production: here and there, diverging from chronological order serves to recast historical relationships and challenge traditional perceptions. Drawn from the collections of major museums, university galleries and private collections, the exhibited works include both well-known icons and little-known surprises. Brief texts discuss each one and interpret the context in which it was made. Supplemental descriptions and images provide a deeper understanding in some cases.

The exhibition is produced by Galerie de l’UQAM with the support of the Virtual Exhibits Investment Program, Virtual Museum of Canada.



three people in costume posing with guitars
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150 YEARS | 150 WORKS: CANADIAN ART AS HISTORICAL ACT

On May 2, Galerie de l’UQAM will launch its brand new virtual exhibition. Three years in the making, 150 Years | 150 Works: Canadian Art as Historical Act brings together the work of more than 150 artists and will be online for the next five years. The Clichettes will represent 1985 with their lip-sync video performance Go to Hell

Go to Hell is a lip-sync performance* of the 1982 song of the same name by the English rock band Motörhead. Here, the all-woman Clichettes are costumed in anatomically correct male bodysuits complete with six-pack abs and genitalia. Armed with fake guitars, they are parodying the macho posturing of “cock-rock” bands. By spoofing the gestures of those musicians and lip-syncing their lyrics, The Clichettes were hilariously denouncing the contrived affectations of male stars.

The Toronto-based satirical performance group The Clichettes made their debut in 1978. Composed of Louise Garfield, Janice Hladki and Johanna Householder, the trio voiced strong feminist and political views in lip-synced renditions of popular songs. As the name suggests, The Clichettes used pop culture clichés, combined with brash humour, to contest gender stereotypes. In 1984, they won the National Lip-Sync Championships in Houston, Texas. The group disbanded in 1992.

Direction: Louise Déry
Curation and coordination: Josée Desforges

Online starting May 2, 2018
150ans150oeuvres.uqam.ca

The virtual exhibition 150 Years | 150 Works: Canadian Art as Historical Act presents art as an integral part of Canada’s social and political history. It looks at Canada through works that have in some way shaped or changed the country’s history over the past century and a half.

Most but not all of the works in this panorama are presented according to their year of production: here and there, diverging from chronological order serves to recast historical relationships and challenge traditional perceptions. Drawn from the collections of major museums, university galleries and private collections, the exhibited works include both well-known icons and little-known surprises. Brief texts discuss each one and interpret the context in which it was made. Supplemental descriptions and images provide a deeper understanding in some cases.

The exhibition is produced by Galerie de l’UQAM with the support of the Virtual Exhibits Investment Program, Virtual Museum of Canada.

Website: 
https://150ans150oeuvres.uqam.ca/en/artwork/1985-go-to-hell-by-the-clichettes/#description
https://www.facebook.com/events/174463513102372/
three people in costume posing with guitars
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