Feature

OCAD U'S SHOPS AND STUDIOS EVOLVE AND EXPAND

Student using a plasma cutter. Photo by Evi Hui.
Student using a plasma cutter. Photo by Evi Hui.

If you were walking past the Sharp Centre for Design one sunny day last October you might have seen a student film crew moving very slowly, shooting a man riding a bicycle backwards. To get their shot they were using one of OCAD U’s specialized, new motion controlled cameras which until recently were the exclusive domain of multimillion-dollar film sets. This is just one example of the changes in the ever-evolving shops and studios at OCAD U.

OCAD U’s studios feature a breadth of equipment. The university preserved traditional studio equipment, such as metal plates and dark rooms for photography, while at the same time adding new digital technologies so students can combine older techniques with new capabilities.

“We’re aware of what students want and we also stay on top with what’s changing and required in program curriculum,” said Nick Hooper, the director of OCAD U’s studio facilities. “Combining digital and traditional processes is our strength.”

OCAD U is home to the only foundry (for casting sculptures in bronze or aluminum) in the downtown core of Toronto. The university also has a unique tool lending program.

Over the past year OCAD U’s shops and studios upgraded to include:

-Extended hours for wood, metal and plastics studios

-A new open shop in Room 161 where students can work independently on their own projects —open all hours the building is

-An expanded sculpture-making facility to accommodate demand

-Renovated foundry and mould-making studios

-New design photography studios dedicated to use by advertising and graphic design students for learning specialized techniques for controlled studio photography

-New laser cutters, 3D printers and CNC routers in the Rapid Prototyping Centre

-A new large printing press for the etching studio

-New work tables for screen printing

-Digital fabric printer with colourfast fabric ink so students can design patterns digitally then print them directly to fabric

-3D wax mould printer for jewelry making

-New risograph printer for the Publications program: uses real ink and prints in poster quality

“We’re always upgrading equipment and improving work spaces.” Hooper said.

 




Student using a plasma cutter. Photo by Evi Hui.

If you were walking past the Sharp Centre for Design one sunny day last October you might have seen a student film crew moving very slowly, shooting a man riding a bicycle backwards. To get their shot they were using one of OCAD U’s specialized, new motion controlled cameras which until recently were the exclusive domain of multimillion-dollar film sets. This is just one example of the changes in the ever-evolving shops and studios at OCAD U.

OCAD U’s studios feature a breadth of equipment. The university preserved traditional studio equipment, such as metal plates and dark rooms for photography, while at the same time adding new digital technologies so students can combine older techniques with new capabilities.

“We’re aware of what students want and we also stay on top with what’s changing and required in program curriculum,” said Nick Hooper, the director of OCAD U’s studio facilities. “Combining digital and traditional processes is our strength.”

OCAD U is home to the only foundry (for casting sculptures in bronze or aluminum) in the downtown core of Toronto. The university also has a unique tool lending program.

Over the past year OCAD U’s shops and studios upgraded to include:

-Extended hours for wood, metal and plastics studios

-A new open shop in Room 161 where students can work independently on their own projects —open all hours the building is

-An expanded sculpture-making facility to accommodate demand

-Renovated foundry and mould-making studios

-New design photography studios dedicated to use by advertising and graphic design students for learning specialized techniques for controlled studio photography

-New laser cutters, 3D printers and CNC routers in the Rapid Prototyping Centre

-A new large printing press for the etching studio

-New work tables for screen printing

-Digital fabric printer with colourfast fabric ink so students can design patterns digitally then print them directly to fabric

-3D wax mould printer for jewelry making

-New risograph printer for the Publications program: uses real ink and prints in poster quality

“We’re always upgrading equipment and improving work spaces.” Hooper said.