With Valentine’s Day and a long weekend ahead of us, here’s a look at some top movie picks from our very own OCAD U staff and faculty. Enjoy!


Lorraine Randell, Sessional instructor, Strategy Development, SFI Program

Auntie Mame

Auntie Mame (1958)
Auntie Mame is a bit of an odd choice as a romance movie, but I see it as a beautiful romance – because it’s about a woman who lives totally true to herself and her values and is fully in love with life. Auntie Mame never fails to make me smile – whether it’s the visuals of the title sequence (Kaleidoscope!) and amazing design details in the sets and costumes, or the way that Mame always seems to keep her humour and win against so many obstacles. (*Note that Auntie Mame (1958) has problematic caricaturized depictions of race and the subordination of women and racialized characters.)


Josh Paglione, Graduate Program Coordinator, Digital Futures, Inclusive Design, Design for Health

Call Me By Your Name

Call Me By Your Name (2017)
Not only is the film visually beautiful, taking place in the countryside of Italy, but also the story about discovering your identity, the chemistry between the lead actors, and I could relate to the coming of age moments throughout the narrative. It’s innocent, beautiful and real. My family is Italian so I can relate to the cultural aspects, the good things and the tensions within the movie.


Ramona Pavilionis, Sessional Instructor, Faculty of Design

Roman Holiday

Roman Holiday (1953)
Since the time I partook in the fantastico OCADU Florence program, I have been obsessed with the idea of one day going back to Italy to teach or even to live there on a part-time basis. Therefore, that says it all! I chose this movie because I have always been enamoured with Italy.

The movie is an entertaining light-hearted black and white romance comedy (1953).  Audrey Hepburn plays a princess who decides to go sightseeing on her own in Rome where she meets Gregory Peck, a journalist who doesn't reveal that he knows her true identity. Then the fun begins!  The visuals are enough to seduce one to visit Italia or in my case, go back for more!

 


Jessica Mace, Ph.D., Instructor, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Clueless

Clueless (1995)
Hear me out! I prefer rom-coms to romances, especially when the protagonist finds love as a by-product of a journey of self-discovery. Based on Jane Austen’s Emma (1815), writer-director Amy Heckerling smartly brought it up to date with goofy, spoiled Beverly Hills teens, who quickly endear themselves to us through clever dialogue and iconic one-liners. While cell phones at school seemed wild at the time, the rest is a mid-90s time capsule: the clothes, the music, and an impossibly ageless Paul Rudd, who delivers a classic on-screen kiss… Alright, so maybe I like a little bit of romance… as if!

 


Karen McCarthy, Senior Manager, Communications and Media

The Way We Were

The Way We Were (1973)

My all-time favourite movie is The Way We Were starring Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand. It follows the journey of two people – who are truly two opposites – for whom love could not conquer all. Every time I watch this movie, I learn more about the main characters: Hubble, a writer who doesn’t like to rock the boat and Katie, an activist who believes in standing up for her beliefs of truth, justice and fairness. The movie follows the trajectory of their marriage as Hubble settles into being a screenwriter in Hollywood. The event that finally ends the marriage is when Katie attends a protest against the House of UnAmerican Activities. Hubble couldn’t understand why Katie went and Katie couldn’t understand why Hubble didn’t take a stand.

 


Andrea Hunniford, Manager Campus Planning & Projects

Pride & Prejudice

Pride & Prejudice (2005)
The simple truth is that this is the only movie I keep downloaded on my phone. While not *quite* as obsessive as the Chilean woman who Netflix reported had watched the film 278 times in a single year, I have found such comfort in watching and re-watching this movie; in the soundtrack, in the details of the landscapes, in the depiction of the homes – stately and otherwise.

 

 

 


Sandra Janzen, Director, Alumni Relations, Annual Giving & Development Operations

Truly Madly Deeply

Truly Madly Deeply (1990)
Maybe not a true romance, but Truly Madly Deeply is a bittersweet film about love, loss and letting go. The characters of Nina and Jamie are brilliantly played by Juliet Stevenson and the late Alan Rickman (my fascination with Rickman started because of this film). It is an intense portrayal of the pain of losing someone you love so deeply and the idealization of the relationship. Ultimately, Jamie provides Nina with the push she needs to see the past clearly and to let go so she can embrace a new future and new relationship. A tear-jerker but worth every minute.

 

 

 


Mark Julien, Assistant, Upper Year Admissions

Big Eden

Big Eden (2000)
I just think that Big Eden is a wonderful film about love and acceptance that everyone should see.

 

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Auntie Mame
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Wednesday February 10th, 2021

With Valentine’s Day and a long weekend ahead of us, here’s a look at some top movie picks from our very own OCAD U staff and faculty. Enjoy!


Lorraine Randell, Sessional instructor, Strategy Development, SFI Program

Auntie Mame

Auntie Mame (1958)
Auntie Mame is a bit of an odd choice as a romance movie, but I see it as a beautiful romance – because it’s about a woman who lives totally true to herself and her values and is fully in love with life. Auntie Mame never fails to make me smile – whether it’s the visuals of the title sequence (Kaleidoscope!) and amazing design details in the sets and costumes, or the way that Mame always seems to keep her humour and win against so many obstacles. (*Note that Auntie Mame (1958) has problematic caricaturized depictions of race and the subordination of women and racialized characters.)


Josh Paglione, Graduate Program Coordinator, Digital Futures, Inclusive Design, Design for Health

Call Me By Your Name

Call Me By Your Name (2017)
Not only is the film visually beautiful, taking place in the countryside of Italy, but also the story about discovering your identity, the chemistry between the lead actors, and I could relate to the coming of age moments throughout the narrative. It’s innocent, beautiful and real. My family is Italian so I can relate to the cultural aspects, the good things and the tensions within the movie.


Ramona Pavilionis, Sessional Instructor, Faculty of Design

Roman Holiday

Roman Holiday (1953)
Since the time I partook in the fantastico OCADU Florence program, I have been obsessed with the idea of one day going back to Italy to teach or even to live there on a part-time basis. Therefore, that says it all! I chose this movie because I have always been enamoured with Italy.

The movie is an entertaining light-hearted black and white romance comedy (1953).  Audrey Hepburn plays a princess who decides to go sightseeing on her own in Rome where she meets Gregory Peck, a journalist who doesn't reveal that he knows her true identity. Then the fun begins!  The visuals are enough to seduce one to visit Italia or in my case, go back for more!

 


Jessica Mace, Ph.D., Instructor, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Clueless

Clueless (1995)
Hear me out! I prefer rom-coms to romances, especially when the protagonist finds love as a by-product of a journey of self-discovery. Based on Jane Austen’s Emma (1815), writer-director Amy Heckerling smartly brought it up to date with goofy, spoiled Beverly Hills teens, who quickly endear themselves to us through clever dialogue and iconic one-liners. While cell phones at school seemed wild at the time, the rest is a mid-90s time capsule: the clothes, the music, and an impossibly ageless Paul Rudd, who delivers a classic on-screen kiss… Alright, so maybe I like a little bit of romance… as if!

 


Karen McCarthy, Senior Manager, Communications and Media

The Way We Were

The Way We Were (1973)

My all-time favourite movie is The Way We Were starring Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand. It follows the journey of two people – who are truly two opposites – for whom love could not conquer all. Every time I watch this movie, I learn more about the main characters: Hubble, a writer who doesn’t like to rock the boat and Katie, an activist who believes in standing up for her beliefs of truth, justice and fairness. The movie follows the trajectory of their marriage as Hubble settles into being a screenwriter in Hollywood. The event that finally ends the marriage is when Katie attends a protest against the House of UnAmerican Activities. Hubble couldn’t understand why Katie went and Katie couldn’t understand why Hubble didn’t take a stand.

 


Andrea Hunniford, Manager Campus Planning & Projects

Pride & Prejudice

Pride & Prejudice (2005)
The simple truth is that this is the only movie I keep downloaded on my phone. While not *quite* as obsessive as the Chilean woman who Netflix reported had watched the film 278 times in a single year, I have found such comfort in watching and re-watching this movie; in the soundtrack, in the details of the landscapes, in the depiction of the homes – stately and otherwise.

 

 

 


Sandra Janzen, Director, Alumni Relations, Annual Giving & Development Operations

Truly Madly Deeply

Truly Madly Deeply (1990)
Maybe not a true romance, but Truly Madly Deeply is a bittersweet film about love, loss and letting go. The characters of Nina and Jamie are brilliantly played by Juliet Stevenson and the late Alan Rickman (my fascination with Rickman started because of this film). It is an intense portrayal of the pain of losing someone you love so deeply and the idealization of the relationship. Ultimately, Jamie provides Nina with the push she needs to see the past clearly and to let go so she can embrace a new future and new relationship. A tear-jerker but worth every minute.

 

 

 


Mark Julien, Assistant, Upper Year Admissions

Big Eden

Big Eden (2000)
I just think that Big Eden is a wonderful film about love and acceptance that everyone should see.

 

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