Women’s Work

Portal, by Loree Ovens
Wednesday, June 25, 2008 - 4:00am to Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 4:00am

Women’s Work is an international washi exhibition on display until July 19, 2008 at the Rebecca Gallery. The show features work from Finland, South Africa, Iceland and Canada. Representing Canada are OCAD alumni Mary Jane Varro, Julia Prime and Loree Ovens as well as local artists Sigrid Blohm, Lynne Munro and Joyce Seagram.
This show was part of the first World Washi Summit organized by the Japanese Paper Place and the Japan Foundation. “Washi” is a term for handmade Japanese paper.

For more information about the summit visit http://www.worldwashisummit.com

Image: Loree Ovens, Portal, a detail of a copper etching on washi, 2008.

Venue & Address: 
Rebecca Gallery 317 Grace Street, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Reveal

Reveal
Friday, July 11, 2008 - 4:00am to Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 4:00am

OCAD alumni, Lex Buchanan,Rachel McFarlane,Reba Forbes, Karen Kraven, Christy Kunitzky, Dan Rocca and Natalie Stone present new work in a group exhibition entitled, Reveal whose work pertains to the diverse ideas of "revealing the unexpected" or "exposure of the forgotten."

Lex Buchanan paints with the view of someone walking through the city as a contemporary flaneur, noting piles of garbage, construction refuse and pylons. In his translation hazardous waste comes alive as a wondrous playground of colour.

In Rachel McFarlane's use of multi-media, illusionary settings allow material to transcend their original capacities, sometimes becoming weightless, anthropomorphic, and grandiose.

Reba Forbes creates paintings that are wooden constructions, which reference and transform the idea of framing. She uses these wooden structures to define interior spaces, transforming what is already present.

Karen Kraven creates installations which use materials normally associated with a hardware store. She defines and transforms interior spaces with very specific and restricted formal sensibilities. Her work demands a slow and attentive eye.

Christy Kunitzky is concerned with drawing our attention to the residues of human existence in spaces. She uses common materials to point out visual details in interior spaces that marks minute and seemingly insignificant acts.

Daniel Rocca is an interdisciplinary artist. He appropriates visual language from multiple points in history, using their synthesis to stew up new realizations and mythologies.

Natalie Stone makes paintings of suburban settings. She uses a muted palette, crude impasto mark making, and aggressive gestures. Her work simultaneously references the mundane and banal, and the monstrous and daunting of skyscrapers, maps and houses.

Venue & Address: 
Beaver Hall Gallery 29 McCaul Street, Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
chostyle@hotmail.com
Cost: 
Free

Rising to the Occasion

Rebecca Belmore
Saturday, June 7, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, October 5, 2008 - 4:00am

Through powerful images that implicate the body, performances that address history and memory, and gestures that evoke a sense of place, OCAD alumna Rebecca Belmore is known for creating multi-disciplinary works that reveal a long-standing commitment to the politics of identity and representation.

Rebecca Belmore comprises a selection of work that spans the course of her significant career, drawing out connections between early performances and later sculptures, photographs and videos through recurring metaphors that are as provocative as they are poignant. In Belmore’s work, the classical reclining figure, for example, is bound in cloth, suspended or scarred, disrupting an otherwise passive gaze and asking viewers to reflect on their relationship to the practice of looking.

Born in Upsala, Ontario and currently living in Vancouver, Belmore has exhibited her work both nationally and internationally, including two solo touring exhibitions, The Named and the Unnamed, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2002 and 33 Pieces, Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 2001. She was Canada's official representative at the Venice Biennale in 2005 and has participated in the Sydney Biennial and the Havana Biennial.

Rebecca Belmore is organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Daina Augaitis, chief curator/associate director and Kathleen Ritter, assistant curator.

Venue & Address: 
Vancouver Art Gallery 750 Hornby Street, Vancouver, British Columbia

Process: Mixed Media

Mixed Media
Friday, July 4, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, August 3, 2008 - 4:00am

As part of a group exhibit, OCAD alumni Kim Dayman and Hali St. Louis offer their respective works to round out a discussion on the evolution of an artist's craft through process.

The subjects of Kim's work have focused strongly on the female rites of passage and tying connections to customs, heirlooms and family.

Merging skills in textile art and traditional painting, Hali's deliberate application of colour and shape evoke sentiments of hope, despair, and celebration.

Venue & Address: 
Studio Nine Gallery at Headbones Gallery 102-260 Carlaw Avenue, Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
director@studioninegallery.com
Cost: 
Free

Passed in the Stuck

Passed in the stuck
Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, August 10, 2008 - 4:00am

While in Europe, OCAD alumna Tanya Cunnington began to examine the roles of the artist, both past and present, and realized that she felt extremely drawn to the past. She began to paint cityscapes as a means to express her strong interest in certain cities as they related to art history.

Passed in the Stuck is comprised of mixed media collages which the artist sees as symbolic of these pasts. They are urban landscapes broken down into pure visual abstraction.

Venue & Address: 
Loop Gallery 1174 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Last Night I Dreamt...

Friday, June 6, 2008 - 4:00am to Friday, June 27, 2008 - 4:00am

Walnut Gallery in Toronto presents new work by OCAD alumni Linda Coates, Michael Dalton, Alex D'Arcy, Laura Darling, Monica Figueredo, Jin Suk No and Niloufar Salimi.

Gallery Hours: Closed Mon & Tues; Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun: 12 to 6 p.m.

Venue & Address: 
Walnut Gallery 966 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

labouriously_

Laboriously3
Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 13, 2008 - 4:00am

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition by OCAD alumna Dawn Stafrace, Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh entitled labouriously_.

Dawn Stafrace's site-specific installations reflect her interest in line, the hand, the maker and learning through touch and making. Using hand-worked sticks, sometimes whittled from wood, other times formed of clay or paper pieces, she creates three-dimensional linear textures that respond to the architecture of the gallery and reflect her intuitive responses to the structure of the work as it develops. The works are literal experiences of line in space. There is a definite focus on labour in the handmade quality of the works; Stafrace chooses not to mechanise the process so that there is physical evidence of presence left on the work. This is done partly out of the desire for the lines to be organic, showing evidence of the hand, but also as an exercise in labour reminiscent of the production potter in which the marks of the hand visually leaves time instilled within its parts. The fragility of the material highlights the fleetingness of Stafrace's efforts and time.

The idea for the works in Scott Ireland's exhibition initially came from urban telephone poles postered with ads. Ireland's process involves the deconstruction and reconfiguration of the Bible, pulling pages from antique books and stapling them to plywood in the pattern of Renaissance wallpaper. The patterns allude to past Renaissance artists who embedded Christianity into their neo-pagan art. By combining the wealthy Renaissance wallpaper pattern, with the message and physicality of the biblical text, Ireland's work comments on current changes and differences in culture and society. By 'posting' the Bible, Ireland aims to interweave the sacred into the fabric of life and society.

Employing habitual repetition of symbolic and bodily processes, the orifice-like sculptural works in Catherine Telford-Keogh's exhibition are constructed using materials laden with cultural and religious myths of the feminine, such as hair, fur, textiles and natural materials. Through sewing, braiding, weaving and wrapping - actions traditionally ascribed to the realm of femininity - as well as repetitive additive and subtractive methods, each sculpture references the bodily construction of the gendered self. Drawing upon a drag and camp aesthetic, she uses over-the-top materials to reveal the performative nature of femininity. The work focuses on revealing and disrupting the repetitive and idealized acts that intelligibly feminize the body. The blatant visibility of these obsessively repeated acts, the oddity of the objects as well as the overt feminine material reveal gender as a pariodic performance rather than something innate and abiding.

Dawn Stafrace is a graduate of OCAD and Sheridan College, and completed her Master's degree in the University of Waterloo's Fine Arts Studio program in 2007. She is currently a resident artist at the Living Arts Centre in Mississauga. Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh are 2008 graduates of the Bachelor of Arts, Fine Arts Studio program at University of Waterloo.

Venue & Address: 
Loop Gallery 1174 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

History of Violence II

Nedham
Wednesday, July 2, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 27, 2008 - 4:00am

LE Gallery in Toronto is pleased to present new works from Amanda Nedham, the 2008 OCAD Printmaking Medal winner. Exploring history through image, Nedham's work explores and disrupts the traditional linearity of history through a method of integrating both analog drawing and digital printing. Through a process of abstraction based on the collaging of drawings, largely from television and internet sources, she attempts to focus on those moments that create tension as they challenge the governing voice of history.

Venue & Address: 
LE Gallery 1183 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
wil@le-gallery.ca
Cost: 
Free

Gallery 44 Centre of Contempary Photography presents: Proof on site residency talk

Keesic
Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 10:00pm to Wednesday, July 23, 2008 - 1:00am

Join Gallery 44 Artists in Residence Keesic Douglas and Susan Blight in conversation with ImagineNATIVE's Artistic Director Danis Goulet and Drake Hotel Curator Mia Nielson.

Venue & Address: 
Gallery 44 401 Richmond St. W, suite 120, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Freeze

Freeze
Monday, June 16, 2008 - 4:00am to Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 4:00am

In a sculptural collaboration, Rebecca Belmore and Osvaldo Yero use ice to make an artwork melted over the duration of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s CASHRA conference. A large block of ice signifies a life-size form, the body absent, as evidence that it too will disappear. This work symbolically suggested the frozen land of Canada in winter. To be left outside for too long is to die.

last seen alive in police custody
under the influence
found 5 days later frozen to death in a field
wearing one shoe
marks on his body likely caused by handcuffs

aboriginal teenage boy
dropped off and walking to where?

In memory of Neil Stonechild (1973-1990)

This is the second installation of Rebecca Belmore and Osvaldo Yero’s temporal sculpture, Freeze. An anti-monument, its power relies on the memories and associations that linger well beyond the physical fact of its disappearance. As ice melts into air over the two days of the human rights conference, the aspiration is that the weight of oppression, personal and systemic, begins to evaporate as well.

Multidisciplinary artists Rebecca Belmore (Anishinabe) and Cuban-born artist Osvaldo Yero currently live and work in Vancouver.

Rebecca Belmore, who represented Canada at the 2005 Venice Biennale, has long been creating work about the plight of the disenfranchised and marginalized in society. In her poignant and dramatic performances, the artist's own body becomes the site of historical, cultural and political investigations as she explores the world of myth and community, boundaries between public and private, chaos and linear narrative.

Osvaldo Yero is best known for dealing with the vernacular culture and political climate of his homeland by incorporating emblems of religion, sexuality, nationalistic crests and symbols in his work with irony and affection.

The installation Freeze is a public art project of the convenience curatorial collective.

Support of the Ontario Human Rights Commission is gratefully acknowledged.

Venue & Address: 
Niagara College Courtyard, Main Building, Niagara-on-the-lake Campus, Niagara-on-the-lake, Ontario
Email: 
rebeccabelmore@yahoo.ca

Pages