Workshop: Surviving Art School - Toolkit for Artists & Designers of Colour

collage image of artwork attributed to Raju Rage
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 3:30pm

Surviving Art School: An Artist of Colour Toolkit
with artist + activist Raju Rage

Thursday, 14 September 2017, 3:30–5 PM
Lambert Lounge (MCA 187), 100 McCaul St
OCAD University

Co-presented with the Office of Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives and OCAD Student Union
Hot Lunch will be served starting at 2:30pm ($3 suggested for meal)

Using the 'Surviving the Art School' publication, produced by Collective Creativity (of which Rage is a member) and published by Nottingham Contemporary (UK), as a starting point, the talk and workshop will ask what this visually entails. During this workshop participants can expect to learn and share strategies for decolonising education. Participants are encouraged to bring with them a 'problem' of the institution to collectively strategise and create a surviving the art school toolkit. This workshop is open to students from all disciplines. 

A presentation of Collective Creativity: a Queer, Trans* Intersex People of Colour artist collective in London UK which aims to create radical, grass roots space for QTIPOC to interrogate the politics of art, in relation to queer identity, institutional racism, and anti-colonialism. CC is dedicated to creating space for conversations that challenge institutional racism and white supremacy within a cultural framework. We are concerned with how we decolonise our art educations, unlearn the histories that replicate the colonial gaze, re-formatting our own art educations and a re-positioning of this canon by re-centring artists and cultural producers of colour.

Raju Rage is an interdisciplinary artist who is proactive about using art, education and activism to forge creative survival. Based in London and working beyond, they primarily use their non-conforming body as a vehicle of embodied knowledge; to bridge the gap between dis/connected bodies, theory and practice, text and the body and aesthetics and the political substance. They work in performance, sculpture, soundscapes and moving image, focusing on techniques of resistance and utilising everyday objects and everyday life experiences in communicating narratives around gender, race and culture. They investigate history, memory and trauma, with an emphasis on colonial legacy, its continuation and impact on the body and contemporary diasporan identity. They are an organiser and member of Collective Creativity arts collective. 

For any accessibility accommodation requests to fully participate in this event, please contact Shamina Chherawala at schherawala@ocadu.ca or 416.977.6000 ext.3840 in advance.

Venue & Address: 
Thursday, September 14 at 3:30 PM - 5 PM Lambert Lounge, 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/306759276454557/
Email: 
schherawala@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416.977.6000 ext.3840
Cost: 
Workshop is free! OCAD Student Union will be serving Hot Lunch from 2:30pm onwards (suggested $3)

Decolonizing Conference

Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 5:15pm to Saturday, November 5, 2016 - 5:15pm

"Race, Anti-Racism and Indigeneity: Anti-Colonial Resurgence and Decolonial Resistance"

Commemorating the 20th Anniversary of CIARS and the 10th Anniversary of the "Decolonizing the Spirit" Conference

Join Assistant Professor Audrey Hudson in her workshop titled: "I Got Your Back: Building Black and Indigenous Relationships in the Academy". Co-Presenting with Rebecca Beaulne-Stuebing.

For more information regarding the speakers and the program please visit the Decolonizing Conference website.

Venue & Address: 
University of Toronto / Ontatio Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON
Website: 
http://www.decolonizingconference.com/
Decolonizing Conference Poster with event info and headshots of Keynote speakers

Beyond the Margins: A Public Forum on the Culture of Discrimination

Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 11:00pm to Friday, March 28, 2008 - 1:00am

Speakers: Vicky Moufawad-Paul, Rachal Gorman and Richard Fung.

Featuring poetry and performances by Chet Singh and Jarret Prescott.
A presentation on the everyday erasure of issues of racism, misogyny, accessibility and homophobia. Vicky Moufawad-Paul is a Video artist and the Programming and Exhibitions Coordinator at A Space Gallery. Rachel Gorman is a choreographer, performance artist, and lecturer at the Women and Gender Studies Institute of the University of Toronto. Richard Fung is a Toronto-based video artist and cultural critic who teaches at OCAD.

Venue & Address: 
Great Hall 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

A Secret Garden

Friday, November 7, 2014 - 12:00am to Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 9:15pm

A Secret Garden is a multimedia installation that will probe the complex tension between the presumed anti-racist political consensus in Western liberal society, and the racist (sub)texts that persist in children’s films and literature. The work takes as its source Francis Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book The Secret Garden and the films that have been adapted from that text. It explores a two-fold ‘white-washing’ of Burnett’s source text: 1) the sterilizing of explicitly racist and colonialist elements from the text in the various film adaptations, and 2) the impact of the idyllic, colonially derived fantasy space of the novel on young readers.

The installation will function as a conversation between traditional art / craft and the digital vernacular of the Millennial shaped by the children's media of the ‘90s. The gallery space will function as the canvas of the exchange: flowers adorning the walls to emulate ornate 19th century wallpaper; furniture covered with hand-painted flowers, nostalgically evocative of a classical colonial living room meets a ‘90s family / media room.

Upon entering the gallery participants will encounter the clashing signifiers of the nostalgic domestic spaces that inform the original text, its film adaptation, and that of its young millennial viewers. Cliché objects of antiquated wealth will jostle with those of the sprawling post-internet late 20th century: colonial portraiture with gifs; Victorian flowers and statuary with data-moshed video works; hand-painted ‘brown’ Mary Lennox(s),with text-based juxtapositions of the text and film that expose both ideological shifts from the source text, and racist and sexist consistencies.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U Student Gallery
A Secret Garden

A Secret Garden

Image of a decorative floral illustrations surrounding an open space with a gradient of purple
Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 5:00am to Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 5:00am

Opening party: Thursday, November 6 (7-11pm)
In conjunction with GTFO in the Small Space

A Secret Garden probes the complex tension between the presumed anti-racist political consensus in Western liberal society, and the racist (sub)texts that persist in children’s films and literature. The work takes as its source Francis Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book The Secret Garden and the films that have been adapted from that text. It explores a two-fold ‘white-washing’ of Burnett’s source text: 1) the sterilizing of explicitly racist and colonialist elements from the text in the various film adaptations, and 2) the impact of the idyllic, colonially derived fantasy space of the novel on young readers.

The installation will function as a conversation between traditional art / craft and the digital vernacular of the Millennial shaped by the children's media of the ‘90s. The gallery space will function as the canvas of the exchange: flowers adorning the walls to emulate ornate 19th century wallpaper; furniture covered with hand-painted flowers, nostalgically evocative of a classical colonial living room meets a ‘90s family / media room.

Upon entering the gallery participants will encounter the clashing signifiers of the nostalgic domestic spaces that inform the original text, its film adaptation, and that of its young millennial viewers. Cliché objects of antiquated wealth will jostle with those of the sprawling post-internet late 20th century: colonial portraiture with gifs; Victorian flowers and statuary with data-moshed video works; hand-painted ‘brown’ Mary Lennox(s),with text-based juxtapositions of the text and film that expose both ideological shifts from the source text, and racist and sexist consistencies.

Artists Featured: Lido Pimienta, Adrienne Crossman, Benjamin McCarthy and Toni Darling

Curated by Lido Pimienta

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U Student Gallery, 52 McCaul Street
Website: 
http://www.studentgallery.ocad.ca
Email: 
studentgallery@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x 263
Cost: 
Free