OCAD Artist Alley 2018: Holiday Edition

Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 2:00pm to 8:00pm

Looking for unique gifts for friends and family this holiday season? Come to OCAD's student-run Holiday Artist Alley: Holiday Edition, where you will find a wide variety of beautiful posters, prints, zines, stickers, greeting cards, ceramics, fashion, jewellery items and more from local creators. This event is open to the public.

Remember to BRING CASH as most artists do not have card readers. There are ATMs in the building.
We are a wheelchair accessible space. Please take the main lobby rear elevators to Level 2, Great Hall.

Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/ocadartistalley to view Artist Profiles leading up to the event!

If you want to volunteer or have questions, please email ocadartistalley@gmail.com

ABOUT ARTIST ALLEY:
The OCAD Artist Alley is a student initiative, created with support from OCAD Student Union, giving students and alumni across all programs the opportunity to exhibit and sell their work.
Poster art by Becky Wu.

RSVP:
Please register your intent to attend through our Eventbrite link (tickets NOT needed for entrance): https://bit.ly/2P6y7sr

Venue & Address: 
Great Hall (Level 2), 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
www.facebook.com/ocadartistalley/
Email: 
ocadartistalley@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free Admission
Holiday OCAD Artist Alley

House Guests: The Most Important Unimportant Things

Opening reception October 25th, 6pm-9pm. October 25th - November 11th.
Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 6:00pm to 9:00pm

Opening reception October 25th, 6pm-9pm.
October 25th - November 11th.

 “The Most Important Unimportant Things” reflects on the sentimental value of knick-knacks and personal objects; the ways in which they mark and transcend time, store our memories on our behalf, and collect narratives that build both individual and community identities.

As artists living in a city we did not grow up in, we monumentalize the objects that move with us, fragile extensions of a distant home. Our individual practices frequently interact with ideas regarding memory, objects and materiality. Our past spontaneous collaborations have revealed interesting overlaps in the way we approach these subjects. We are interested in the intersection between importance and unimportance in relation to objects and artworks. As illustrators, our work often exists in transient forms and isn’t afforded extensive consideration, in the same way that trinkets appear to an impersonal viewer. How can intimacy be fostered through artistic collaboration? What role can collected objects play in the sharing of stories? As key holders to our memories, does our “stuff” serve as an extension of ourselves? And, is the act of collecting objects a manifestation of hope, similarly to the act of creating art? Approached with an affection and lightness, “The Most Important Unimportant Things” aims to foster a cozy, cluttered environment that gives the viewer unusual insight as a passerby to private collections, inviting them to reflect on their own material memories.

A show of painting, sculpture, and installation, with work by:
Kristi Chen - https://chen-kristi.format.com
Eryn Lougheed - https://www.erynlou.com
Lily Snowden-Fine - https://www.lilysnowdenfine.com
Adam de Souza - https://www.kumerish.com
Mary Kirkpatrick - https://www.mary-kirkpatrick.com
And in loving memory, Sarah Mason - https://sarahmason.format.com

Venue & Address: 
Ignite Gallery 165 Augusta Ave
Email: 
ignitegallery@ocadu.ca
Ignite Gallery exhibition Poster

Call for Applications: Holiday Artist Alley

Apply Now: Holiday Artist Alley
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 12:00pm to Saturday, November 3, 2018 - 11:45pm

We would like to showcase talent from current OCAD U students and alumni across all programs so every art form is welcome! Deadline to apply is Saturday, November 3, 2018 (11:59 PM)

This event will be held in the Great Hall in 100 McCaul Street (2 to 8 PM), on Tuesday, December 4, 2018.

More details to apply on our Page OCAD Artist Alley
If you have questions, please contact: ocadartistalley@gmail.com

VOLUNTEER:
Please consider volunteering with us! Volunteers will be guaranteed space to sell their work.

Venue & Address: 
Great Hall (Level 2), 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
www.facebook.com/OCAD-Artist-Alley-507513873031048/
Email: 
ocadartistalley@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free to apply and participate

A House That Gleams With A Yellow Light

Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 6:00pm to Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 6:00pm

A burning light floods the curtains in the morning and falls into the evening sun which streaks across another's floor. 

As day turns to dusk, the house across the street still glows with a dim light.

The telephone wires buzz while the neighbour’s headlights flash in their driveway. 

Here, the tender warmth of a home and the unfamiliar touch of a stranger.

A House that Gleams With a Yellow Light (PDF)

Opening Reception

September 20th 6-9

165 Augusta Ave

Venue & Address: 
Ignite Gallery 165 Augusta Ave
Website: 
https://www2.ocadu.ca/event/a-house-that-gleams-with-a-yellow-light?_ga=2.243100866.1382946052.1535556615-359441138.1528312296
Email: 
ignitegallery@ocadu.ca
An exhibition by  Brandon Fujimagari, Cleo Halfpenny, Sangmin Lee

Ignite Gallery Student Monitor

Ignite Gallery
Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 12:30pm

Ignite Gallery represents the current creative voice of OCAD University students and recent graduates through exhibitions, events and community programs. 

Ignite Gallery (formerly the OCAD U Student Gallery) continues its 40+ year history of support for the exciting work of emerging artists, designers and curators from OCAD University.  

Located in Kensington Market, Ignite Gallery is currently recruiting IWSP-eligible Student Monitors for the Fall/Winter term to serve as front-line staff welcoming and informing visitors about exhibitions and public events, to supervise the gallery, and help with install and de-install of shows.  

Reporting to the Community Coordinator, Ignite Gallery, the Ignite Gallery Student Monitor will:  

  • Greet visitors as they enter the gallery and provide information on present and upcoming exhibitions, public events and general gallery and OCAD U information.  

  • Assist with installation and de-installation of exhibitions, as needed, which may include: light lifting and moving of objects, installing hanging material, moving plinths, patch/repair and paint walls and hanging wall labels.  

  • Track daily attendance 

  • Perform opening and closing duties including: turning on and off the works in the exhibition, keeping the gallery tidy and locking all doors.  

  • Provide staffing assistance for all public programs and events, such as the opening reception, where duties may include: setup and takedown of chairs and tables, serving food, selling drinks and taking photographs.  

  • Ensure all exhibition elements are in proper working order and all gallery areas are clean/tidy. Examine the exhibitions daily to identify if maintenance is needed on artworks, perform corrective action (as appropriate) and notify other staff as needed.  

  • Perform administrative tasks including, basic graphic design, writing reports related to gallery attendance and audience response. Replenishes gallery material, such as exhibition brochures, at the front desk and other areas as needed.  

  • Perform other tasks as assigned by the Community Coordinator and Gallery System management.  

Requirements:  

  • Eligible for the Institutional Work Study Plan (IWSP)* 

  • Currently enrolled as an OCAD University student  

  • Interest in contemporary art and design  

  • Able to work with power tools and on ladders 

  • Comfortable in a public speaking role  

  • Strong verbal communication skills  

  • Ability to work under general direction and in a team environment  

  • Strong interpersonal skills; enjoy working with the public  

  • Must be able to work flexible hours for public event shifts  

Assets:  

  • Ability to operate audio/visual and office equipment  

  • Knowledge and comfort using social media (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram) to assist with Onsite Gallery's digital presence and promotion  

  • Smart Serve certified  

  • Graphic design skills or competence in creative suite 

Duration: early September 2018 to end of the school year 2019, with possibility of renewing for the following exhibition period  

Rate of pay: $15.68 per hour (which includes pay in lieu of vacation and benefits) 

Schedule: 1-2 regular weekly shifts to be determined, resulting in between 5-10 hours/week, depending on availability  

Vacancies: 2-3 

Please submit the following to Morgan Mavis, Community Coordinator, mmavis@ocadu.ca 

  • a cover letter 

  • resume 

  • your IWSP eligibility confirmation for the Fall/Winter 

*Institutional Work Study consists of part-time employment for students on or near campus while they are enrolled in a program of instruction, to supplement OSAP assistance received by students, or to assist other students with demonstrated financial need. 

Students must meet the following criteria in order to apply for the IWSP: 

  • Be a Undergraduate or Graduate student at OCAD U during the 2018 Fall/Winter 

  • Be a Canadian citizen, Permanent Resident or Protected Person 

  • Be Ontario resident or out-of-province student and have submitted an error-free loan application  

  • Be registered in full-time studies (as defined by OSAP) during the 2018/19 fall/winter semester; for the summer session students must be registered in at least 0.5 credits 

  • Demonstrate financial need (priority is given to OSAP students; out-of province students will only be considered if funds are available)   

  • Note: if you are an out-of-province student, you must attach a copy of your loan/student aid assessment document showing federal/provincial funding. 

  • Note: if you are restricted from OSAP or out-of-province loans, please visit the Financial Aid & Awards Office in person to meet with an advisor to discuss your restriction. 

For more information on the IWSP program, please visit the Student Employment webpage here

  

Applications will be accepted until 11:59 p.m., August 29, 2018. 

As an employer committed to employment equity, we encourage applications from members of equity-seeking communities including women, racialized and Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, and persons of all sexual orientations and gender identities/expressions 

O-DAYS! OCAD Artist Alley

Wednesday, September 5, 2018 - 11:00am to 5:00pm

Need new paintings or sculptures to decorate your room? Maybe a one-of-a-kind jacket, or a custom ring? Some prints, zines, or stickers?

This event is open to the public so come by and support local artists!
**Remember to BRING CASH as most artists do not have card readers**

We'll be revealing Artist Profiles leading up to the event... Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/ocadartistalley/

The OCAD Artist Alley is a student initiative, in collaboration with OCAD U Campus Life and O-Days! 2018, to give students and alumni across all programs the opportunity to exhibit and sell their work.

Poster art by Becky Wu.

Eventbrite link: (coming soon)*: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ocad-artist-alley-2018-tickets-49075457013 
*Tickets NOT needed for entrance.

VOLUNTEER! Or ask Questions:
Please contact: ocadartistalley@gmail.com

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U's Butterfield Park, 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
www.instagram.com/ocadartistalley/
www.facebook.com/events/386542508542749/
www.facebook.com/OCAD-Artist-Alley-507513873031048/
Email: 
ocadartistalley@gmail.com
Artist Alley poster

Message in a Bottle

Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 4:00pm to Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 6:00pm

In Message in a Bottle, artists create hybrid arrangements out of materials that have been thoughtfully scavenged, collected and culled. These materials carry information and transmit messages as they traverse space, criss-cross time and shift context. Industrial, natural and domestic ephemera take on new forms, which reveal each artist’s considered regeneration of the material world.

Featuring artists: Erika Defreitas, Qendrim Hoti (OCAD U MFA alum), Ginette Legaré (OCAD U Professor), Laura Moore, Jennifer Murphy and Jacob Whibley (OCAD U alum).

Curated by Kristiina Lahde

July 21 – August 18, 2018

Opening reception: Saturday, July 21, 4 to 6 p.m.

Zalucky Contemporary, 3044 Dundas Street West, Toronto.

Venue & Address: 
Zalucky Contemporary, 3044 Dundas Street West, Toronto
Website: 
http://www.zaluckycontemporary.com/exhibitions/exhibitions-upcoming.html
Qendrim Hoti, Cafe Burri, 2018, Balkan style coffee pot, Canadian made screw driver handles, 7 x 17.8 x 5.7 cm

Call for Applications: OCAD U Artist Alley

Friday, July 6, 2018 - 1:30pm to Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 11:45pm

This student-run event will be held in Butterfield Park on the first day of classes (Wednesday, September 5, 11 AM to 5 PM), as part of O-DAYS! 2018.

We would like to showcase talent from current OCAD U students and alumni across all programs so every art form is welcome!

Free to both apply and table! Deadline to apply is July 31.

If you want to volunteer or have questions about this student-run initiative, please email ocadartistalley@gmail.com

Artist Applications: https://goo.gl/forms/v7eZSr5ZnfP1HYFX2 ✦

✦ FAQs ✦

Q: Who can apply? 
A: Any current OCAD U student or alumni. Please note we are not accepting applications from incoming first years. 

Q: How many artists are you accepting?
A: We currently have space for around 20 artists in Butterfield park. If there is a high volume of applicants, we will look to increasing the venue space. 

Q: What are we allowed to sell? 
A: Anything that you have made! This includes: prints, posters, stickers, paintings, merchandise, sculptures, jewelry, fashion, zines, and more! Fanart and original art both allowed. 

Q: I'm a Sculpture major, but I also make stamps and prints! Can I sell those? 
A: Yes! Please don't feel restricted by what your major is at all; we only ask for your program out of interest. 

Q: What if we have class or other commitments in the middle of the event?
A: Please try to find a friend to watch your table for you while you are away. If you are selected and need help finding someone, get in touch with us right away. Please note that you should be here prior to 11 for set-up and clean-up will start at 5. 

Q: How big are the tables?
They are 29 by 30 by 72 inches (H x W x L).

Q: Will there be food or refreshments?
A: We will have small snacks and water available but it would be a good idea to pack a lunch beforehand, or arrange to have lunch delivered. 

Q: Is this event happening rain or shine? 
A: The short answer is yes, but the event time may be shortened. While this is an outdoors event, the majority of the space is sheltered by the Sharp Center for Design. 

Q: Who is running this event?
A: This event is organized and run by students at OCAD, sponsored by OCAD U Campus Life, as part of O-DAYS! 2018. 

Please note you will be responsible for handling your own cash and transactions. OCAD U is not responsible for any lost or damaged property.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Butterfield Park (Wednesday, September 5 / 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.) 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/474600512983035/
www.ocadu.ca/orientation
Email: 
ocadartistalley@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free
OCAD Artist Alley

Dragon Tank

exhibition poster
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 12:00pm to Sunday, September 9, 2018 - 6:00pm

Inspired by the entrepreneurial television series’ Shark Tank and Dragons’ Den, Dragon Tank aims to reproduce the absurd products pitched within them. With humour in mind, the artworks will function as vestiges of the most needed and most useless consumer products. In a time when ridiculous and nonsensical has become the norm, we are critical of the enigmatic ‘North American Dream’ capitalism offers to consumers and entrepreneurs alike. And question who this ‘dream’ is really for, in the context of race, gender, sexuality, and class.

Dragon Tank price list

Opening Reception: August 23 @ 7-10

 

Venue & Address: 
165 Augusta Ave
Website: 
https://www.ocadu.ca/gallery/ignite-gallery/current-exhibition.htm
Email: 
ignitegallery@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
free
Exhibition application

The Entangled Gaze: Indigenous and European Views of Each Other

Sea Captain Figure, c. 1840. Haida, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. Argillite, ivory, 46.8 x 13.5 x 8 cm. Purchased with Funds from the Estate of Mary Eileen Ash, 2008. Image © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2008/43 / Paul Kane. Death of Omoxesisisany or Big Snake, 1858 c – 1859. Embossed chromo lithograph on paper, 17.2 x 46.1 cm. Gift of Robert Hunter, 2006. © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2006/29

 

The Entangled Gaze: Indigenous and European Views of Each Other was a two-day conference co-hosted by OCAD University and the Art Gallery of Ontario. The conference convened an international group of scholars and museum professionals from the fields of art history, anthropology, cultural studies and curatorial practice to explore the topic of how Indigenous and European artists have represented each other in historical art and visual culture. The conference builds on the ground-breaking work of Julius Lips, “The Savage Hits Back, or The White Man through Native Eyes” (1937), Nii Quarcoopome’s landmark exhibition “Through African Eyes: The European in African Art, 1500 to Present (2010) at the Detroit Institute of Art, and on the research of project lead Dr. Gerald McMaster, conducted over the past decade, into how historical Indigenous artists in North America have represented their Euro-American Others.

The goals of The Entangled Gaze were as follows:

  • To generate new knowledge of the media, methods and meanings of historical Indigenous and European representations of each other;
  • To develop innovative conceptual approaches to the study of Indigenous and Euro-North American art/histories, by drawing on Indigenous epistemologies and perspectives in order to generate scholarship outside the mainstream anthropological/art historical purview;
  • To share and develop new interdisciplinary methodologies for collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge on the diverse artistic histories of Indigenous and Euro-North American peoples;
  • To communicate this knowledge to our scholarly, professional and public audiences in relevant and accessible media;
  • To develop OCAD University’s Indigenous Visual Culture Research Centre as an international leader in collaborative research on the art/histories of Indigenous and Euro-North American peoples.

Drawing on a global archive of Indigenous and Euro-North American art and visual and material culture from international public collections, conference contributors will approach two key questions:

  • how do we represent people who are different from ourselves, and
  • what are the consequences or results that arise out of this representation?

For over a decade, Dr. McMaster has been gathering various types of information on how First Nations and Inuit artists depict Europeans or people of European ancestry. We are all, of course, familiar with European and North American artistic representations of First Nations and the Inuit; however, the reverse is not within the current artistic or public discourse. In effect, there is an unequal dialectical exchange. McMaster's course of research is intended to redress this inequality. In 2013-14 he examined 38 European collections, where much early North American material history is housed; since then, he remains the sole researcher with sustained interest in this particular subject matter. Dr. McMaster's research is grounded in the theory of the "reverse gaze," a conceptual approach he uses to promote Indigenous representations of Europeans as primary documents in the reconstruction of Canadian history.

Conference participants are international and interdisciplinary researchers, museum professionals, artists, and Indigenous Elders. As anthropologist Regna Darnell has pointed out, cross-cultural study of the Other is no longer the preserve of the discipline of anthropology. Drawing from perspectives in art/history, cultural studies, fine art and anthropology, The Entangled Gaze will also generate print and online publications from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Select papers will be published as peer-reviewed articles in a special issue of AbOriginal: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures, for which primary applicant Dr. Gerald McMaster is an Editor.

Conference participants included: host Gerald McMaster; artists Kent Monkman, Bonnie Devine, Barry Ace, Rosalie Favel, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie, Embassy of Imagination, Lisa Myers; scholars Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Rainer Hatoum, Kaitlin McCormick, Jonathan King, Nicole Perry, Monika Siebert, Christopher Green, Anna Brus, Markus Lindner, Rick Hill; and curators Wanda Nanibush, Nika Collison Jisgang, Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Nii Q. Quarcoopome, and Candace Greene.

SPEAKERS:

Kent Monkman, The Four Continents. Monkman’s major series “The Four Continents” reflected on the “painted voyage” from the Renaissance to Romanticism – a visual journey upon which Europeans projected their views of the world onto other continents. 

Gerald McMaster, Introduction. McMaster’s presentation was an overview of his research through the collecting relevant materials in the world’s museums, amassing the evidence needed to demonstrate that the character of the creative strategies with which Indigenous peoples documented Europeans amounts to a “reverse gaze.” 

Kaitlin McCormick presented the work of Tsimshian artist Frederick Alexcee (1853-1939) and how he chose to represent his community of Fort/Port Simpson through an examination of works which he created and sold to non-Indigenous people.

Anna Brus, Obstinate Objects: Native American Art as Seen by Julius Lips. Brus addressed the work of Julius Lips, who advanced a kaleidoscopic view of representations of the European worldwide, thus inverting the colonial gaze onto the “Other.” 

Nii Quarcoopome, Representation/Re-Presentation: Five Centuries of Changing African Depictions of the European ‘Other.’ Quarcoopome offered an historical review of this rich and complex visual record, and aims to illustrate shifting and conflicted African emotional responses to the European presence.

Barry Ace and Rosalie Favell, In conversation, Every.Now.Then: Reframing Nationhood. Ace in particular spoke about the Anishinaabe Maungwaudaus’s trip to Europe in the 19th century.

Justine Kohleal + Tak Pham, Virtual Indigenous Platform for Global Indigenous Initiative. They spoke about how the Indigenous Visual Culture Research Centre is embarking on the creation of a research and knowledge exchange that will link with local, national, and international universities, museums, galleries, and Indigenous communities.

Jonathan King, Beyond the Glazing: Aboriginal Artists Behind Glass No More. King spoke about artists from the Arctic and the Northwest coast, and how they have taken control not merely of narrative in art practice, but of traditional continuity in politics and self-presentation.

Krista Ulujuk-Zwadski, Stitching our Knowledge with Miqqutiit and Kakpiit. Ulujuk-Zwadski spoke about how Inuit art has a history of representing Inuit ways of life, beliefs and stories through an autoethnographic lens, and how the early Inuit gaze seldom represented “others” but was dominated by Inuit representations of ourselves.

Monika Siebert, Pocahontas Looks Back

Elder Jan Longboat, Turtle Clan of the Mohawk Nation, is an Elder, educator, writer, herbalist, cultural advocate, and visionary, having dedicated her life to the dissemination and learning of Indigenous language and culture. Elder Longboat talked about Mohawk ways of seeing.

Gary Sault, Anishinaabe Elder from Mississauga’s New Credit Nation. Elder Sault used various wampum belts to discuss Indigenous/European relations.

Rick Hill, Two Row Wampum. Hill spoke about how the people from the ship and the people from the canoe viewed each other as told through the oral history of the Two Row Wampum; and how Indigenous artists were more open and less biased that the western art that followed, using Iroquois hair combs and western art to illustrate.

Hulleah Tshinhnahjinnie, Visualizing Reciprocity. Tshinhnahjinnie presented the idea of how protocols enacted by Indigenous researchers, historians, and artists effects reciprocity, whereas western-based researchers, historians, and artists unaware of protocol as establishing relationships, tend to revert to utilizing research as a buttress of colonization.

Christopher T. Green, [House] Post Modern: Tlingit Responses to the ‘Modern’ Revival. Green discussed Tlingit artists Nathan Jackson and Jim Schoppert’s individual critiques of the Western modernist aesthetics defining the category of fine art, which Northwest Coast artists entered into in the 1960s and 70s.

Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson, Embassy of Imagination Artists Talk. Along with a number of youth from Kinngait, Cape Dorset, Hatanaka and Thompson spoke about how they achieve self-empowerment through creating collaborative projects in their community and public art projects by inserting Inuit youth voices in Southern Canadian city centres.

Bonnie Devine and Lisa Myers, In conversation, Every.Now.Then: Reframing Nationhood

Jisgang Nika Collison and Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Gud Gii AanaaGung: Look at One Another. Collison and Bunn-Marcuse spoke about how Haida artists during the 19th century documented their observations using voice and clever hands, often in life-like sculptures of Europeans and their exotic possessions, reflecting their complicated relationships with Euro-American settlers, colonial administrators, and visitors.

Rainer Hatoum, Revisiting Boas: Exploring Issues of the “Entangled Gaze” on the Basis of His Field Notes. Reflecting four years of deciphering and transcribing Franz Boas’ shorthand notes, Hatoum’s presentation lent fresh insights into Boas’s lifelong attempts to grasp “Indigenous Others” and their manifold artistic expressions, which sometimes reversed the gaze onto Europeans.

Candace Greene, Friends/Enemies; Partners/Competitors. Greene’s paper explored a small but important group of 19th century pictorial art from the Arikara and affiliated tribes as they engaged with Euro-Americans along the Missouri River.

Nicole Perry, German Cultural Appropriations of Indigeneity: ‘Indianer,’ Winnetou, and Indigenous Interventions. Perry’s paper explored how Kent Monkman engages with and challenges (German) colonial pasts and Euro-American tropes of the “Indianer” and the cultural appropriation of the Indigenous image, thus exemplifying contemporary Indigenous struggles through the lens of native survivance.

Markus Lindner, Buffalo Bill’s “Indians’ Gaze Back: Europe and Europeans in Arthur Amiotte’s Collages. Lindner focused Lakota artist Arthur Amiotte, who connects his family history – including that of his Austrian great-grandmother – with the general history of the Lakotas of the early reservation period.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT:
The Entangled Gaze Website
The Savage Hits Back Revisited
The Savage Hits Back Revisited review

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

SSHRC Logo

Creator: 
Image of Paul Kane painting juxtaposed against an ivory Haida carving of a "Sea Captain Figure"
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 1:30pm
Lab Member: 
Gerald Mcmaster
Tak Pham

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