Call for Applications: OCAD U Artist Alley

Friday, July 6, 2018 - 1:30pm to Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 11:45pm

This student-run event will be held in Butterfield Park on the first day of classes (Wednesday, September 5, 11 AM to 5 PM), as part of O-DAYS! 2018.

We would like to showcase talent from current OCAD U students and alumni across all programs so every art form is welcome!

Free to both apply and table! Deadline to apply is July 31.

If you want to volunteer or have questions about this student-run initiative, please email ocadartistalley@gmail.com

Artist Applications: https://goo.gl/forms/v7eZSr5ZnfP1HYFX2 ✦

✦ FAQs ✦

Q: Who can apply? 
A: Any current OCAD U student or alumni. Please note we are not accepting applications from incoming first years. 

Q: How many artists are you accepting?
A: We currently have space for around 20 artists in Butterfield park. If there is a high volume of applicants, we will look to increasing the venue space. 

Q: What are we allowed to sell? 
A: Anything that you have made! This includes: prints, posters, stickers, paintings, merchandise, sculptures, jewelry, fashion, zines, and more! Fanart and original art both allowed. 

Q: I'm a Sculpture major, but I also make stamps and prints! Can I sell those? 
A: Yes! Please don't feel restricted by what your major is at all; we only ask for your program out of interest. 

Q: What if we have class or other commitments in the middle of the event?
A: Please try to find a friend to watch your table for you while you are away. If you are selected and need help finding someone, get in touch with us right away. Please note that you should be here prior to 11 for set-up and clean-up will start at 5. 

Q: How big are the tables?
They are 29 by 30 by 72 inches (H x W x L).

Q: Will there be food or refreshments?
A: We will have small snacks and water available but it would be a good idea to pack a lunch beforehand, or arrange to have lunch delivered. 

Q: Is this event happening rain or shine? 
A: The short answer is yes, but the event time may be shortened. While this is an outdoors event, the majority of the space is sheltered by the Sharp Center for Design. 

Q: Who is running this event?
A: This event is organized and run by students at OCAD, sponsored by OCAD U Campus Life, as part of O-DAYS! 2018. 

Please note you will be responsible for handling your own cash and transactions. OCAD U is not responsible for any lost or damaged property.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Butterfield Park (Wednesday, September 5 / 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.) 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/474600512983035/
www.ocadu.ca/orientation
Email: 
ocadartistalley@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free
OCAD Artist Alley

Dragon Tank

exhibition poster
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 12:00pm to Sunday, September 9, 2018 - 6:00pm

Inspired by the entrepreneurial television series’ Shark Tank and Dragons’ Den, Dragon Tank aims to reproduce the absurd products pitched within them. With humour in mind, the artworks will function as vestiges of the most needed and most useless consumer products. In a time when ridiculous and nonsensical has become the norm, we are critical of the enigmatic ‘North American Dream’ capitalism offers to consumers and entrepreneurs alike. And question who this ‘dream’ is really for, in the context of race, gender, sexuality, and class.

Dragon Tank price list

Opening Reception: August 23 @ 7-10

 

Venue & Address: 
165 Augusta Ave
Website: 
https://www.ocadu.ca/gallery/ignite-gallery/current-exhibition.htm
Email: 
ignitegallery@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
free
Exhibition application

The Entangled Gaze: Indigenous and European Views of Each Other

Sea Captain Figure, c. 1840. Haida, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. Argillite, ivory, 46.8 x 13.5 x 8 cm. Purchased with Funds from the Estate of Mary Eileen Ash, 2008. Image © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2008/43 / Paul Kane. Death of Omoxesisisany or Big Snake, 1858 c – 1859. Embossed chromo lithograph on paper, 17.2 x 46.1 cm. Gift of Robert Hunter, 2006. © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2006/29

 

The Entangled Gaze: Indigenous and European Views of Each Other was a two-day conference co-hosted by OCAD University and the Art Gallery of Ontario. The conference convened an international group of scholars and museum professionals from the fields of art history, anthropology, cultural studies and curatorial practice to explore the topic of how Indigenous and European artists have represented each other in historical art and visual culture. The conference builds on the ground-breaking work of Julius Lips, “The Savage Hits Back, or The White Man through Native Eyes” (1937), Nii Quarcoopome’s landmark exhibition “Through African Eyes: The European in African Art, 1500 to Present (2010) at the Detroit Institute of Art, and on the research of project lead Dr. Gerald McMaster, conducted over the past decade, into how historical Indigenous artists in North America have represented their Euro-American Others.

The goals of The Entangled Gaze were as follows:

  • To generate new knowledge of the media, methods and meanings of historical Indigenous and European representations of each other;
  • To develop innovative conceptual approaches to the study of Indigenous and Euro-North American art/histories, by drawing on Indigenous epistemologies and perspectives in order to generate scholarship outside the mainstream anthropological/art historical purview;
  • To share and develop new interdisciplinary methodologies for collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge on the diverse artistic histories of Indigenous and Euro-North American peoples;
  • To communicate this knowledge to our scholarly, professional and public audiences in relevant and accessible media;
  • To develop OCAD University’s Indigenous Visual Culture Research Centre as an international leader in collaborative research on the art/histories of Indigenous and Euro-North American peoples.

Drawing on a global archive of Indigenous and Euro-North American art and visual and material culture from international public collections, conference contributors will approach two key questions:

  • how do we represent people who are different from ourselves, and
  • what are the consequences or results that arise out of this representation?

For over a decade, Dr. McMaster has been gathering various types of information on how First Nations and Inuit artists depict Europeans or people of European ancestry. We are all, of course, familiar with European and North American artistic representations of First Nations and the Inuit; however, the reverse is not within the current artistic or public discourse. In effect, there is an unequal dialectical exchange. McMaster's course of research is intended to redress this inequality. In 2013-14 he examined 38 European collections, where much early North American material history is housed; since then, he remains the sole researcher with sustained interest in this particular subject matter. Dr. McMaster's research is grounded in the theory of the "reverse gaze," a conceptual approach he uses to promote Indigenous representations of Europeans as primary documents in the reconstruction of Canadian history.

Conference participants are international and interdisciplinary researchers, museum professionals, artists, and Indigenous Elders. As anthropologist Regna Darnell has pointed out, cross-cultural study of the Other is no longer the preserve of the discipline of anthropology. Drawing from perspectives in art/history, cultural studies, fine art and anthropology, The Entangled Gaze will also generate print and online publications from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Select papers will be published as peer-reviewed articles in a special issue of AbOriginal: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures, for which primary applicant Dr. Gerald McMaster is an Editor.

Conference participants included: host Gerald McMaster; artists Kent Monkman, Bonnie Devine, Barry Ace, Rosalie Favel, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie, Embassy of Imagination, Lisa Myers; scholars Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Rainer Hatoum, Kaitlin McCormick, Jonathan King, Nicole Perry, Monika Siebert, Christopher Green, Anna Brus, Markus Lindner, Rick Hill; and curators Wanda Nanibush, Nika Collison Jisgang, Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Nii Q. Quarcoopome, and Candace Greene.

SPEAKERS:

Kent Monkman, The Four Continents. Monkman’s major series “The Four Continents” reflected on the “painted voyage” from the Renaissance to Romanticism – a visual journey upon which Europeans projected their views of the world onto other continents. 

Gerald McMaster, Introduction. McMaster’s presentation was an overview of his research through the collecting relevant materials in the world’s museums, amassing the evidence needed to demonstrate that the character of the creative strategies with which Indigenous peoples documented Europeans amounts to a “reverse gaze.” 

Kaitlin McCormick presented the work of Tsimshian artist Frederick Alexcee (1853-1939) and how he chose to represent his community of Fort/Port Simpson through an examination of works which he created and sold to non-Indigenous people.

Anna Brus, Obstinate Objects: Native American Art as Seen by Julius Lips. Brus addressed the work of Julius Lips, who advanced a kaleidoscopic view of representations of the European worldwide, thus inverting the colonial gaze onto the “Other.” 

Nii Quarcoopome, Representation/Re-Presentation: Five Centuries of Changing African Depictions of the European ‘Other.’ Quarcoopome offered an historical review of this rich and complex visual record, and aims to illustrate shifting and conflicted African emotional responses to the European presence.

Barry Ace and Rosalie Favell, In conversation, Every.Now.Then: Reframing Nationhood. Ace in particular spoke about the Anishinaabe Maungwaudaus’s trip to Europe in the 19th century.

Justine Kohleal + Tak Pham, Virtual Indigenous Platform for Global Indigenous Initiative. They spoke about how the Indigenous Visual Culture Research Centre is embarking on the creation of a research and knowledge exchange that will link with local, national, and international universities, museums, galleries, and Indigenous communities.

Jonathan King, Beyond the Glazing: Aboriginal Artists Behind Glass No More. King spoke about artists from the Arctic and the Northwest coast, and how they have taken control not merely of narrative in art practice, but of traditional continuity in politics and self-presentation.

Krista Ulujuk-Zwadski, Stitching our Knowledge with Miqqutiit and Kakpiit. Ulujuk-Zwadski spoke about how Inuit art has a history of representing Inuit ways of life, beliefs and stories through an autoethnographic lens, and how the early Inuit gaze seldom represented “others” but was dominated by Inuit representations of ourselves.

Monika Siebert, Pocahontas Looks Back

Elder Jan Longboat, Turtle Clan of the Mohawk Nation, is an Elder, educator, writer, herbalist, cultural advocate, and visionary, having dedicated her life to the dissemination and learning of Indigenous language and culture. Elder Longboat talked about Mohawk ways of seeing.

Gary Sault, Anishinaabe Elder from Mississauga’s New Credit Nation. Elder Sault used various wampum belts to discuss Indigenous/European relations.

Rick Hill, Two Row Wampum. Hill spoke about how the people from the ship and the people from the canoe viewed each other as told through the oral history of the Two Row Wampum; and how Indigenous artists were more open and less biased that the western art that followed, using Iroquois hair combs and western art to illustrate.

Hulleah Tshinhnahjinnie, Visualizing Reciprocity. Tshinhnahjinnie presented the idea of how protocols enacted by Indigenous researchers, historians, and artists effects reciprocity, whereas western-based researchers, historians, and artists unaware of protocol as establishing relationships, tend to revert to utilizing research as a buttress of colonization.

Christopher T. Green, [House] Post Modern: Tlingit Responses to the ‘Modern’ Revival. Green discussed Tlingit artists Nathan Jackson and Jim Schoppert’s individual critiques of the Western modernist aesthetics defining the category of fine art, which Northwest Coast artists entered into in the 1960s and 70s.

Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson, Embassy of Imagination Artists Talk. Along with a number of youth from Kinngait, Cape Dorset, Hatanaka and Thompson spoke about how they achieve self-empowerment through creating collaborative projects in their community and public art projects by inserting Inuit youth voices in Southern Canadian city centres.

Bonnie Devine and Lisa Myers, In conversation, Every.Now.Then: Reframing Nationhood

Jisgang Nika Collison and Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Gud Gii AanaaGung: Look at One Another. Collison and Bunn-Marcuse spoke about how Haida artists during the 19th century documented their observations using voice and clever hands, often in life-like sculptures of Europeans and their exotic possessions, reflecting their complicated relationships with Euro-American settlers, colonial administrators, and visitors.

Rainer Hatoum, Revisiting Boas: Exploring Issues of the “Entangled Gaze” on the Basis of His Field Notes. Reflecting four years of deciphering and transcribing Franz Boas’ shorthand notes, Hatoum’s presentation lent fresh insights into Boas’s lifelong attempts to grasp “Indigenous Others” and their manifold artistic expressions, which sometimes reversed the gaze onto Europeans.

Candace Greene, Friends/Enemies; Partners/Competitors. Greene’s paper explored a small but important group of 19th century pictorial art from the Arikara and affiliated tribes as they engaged with Euro-Americans along the Missouri River.

Nicole Perry, German Cultural Appropriations of Indigeneity: ‘Indianer,’ Winnetou, and Indigenous Interventions. Perry’s paper explored how Kent Monkman engages with and challenges (German) colonial pasts and Euro-American tropes of the “Indianer” and the cultural appropriation of the Indigenous image, thus exemplifying contemporary Indigenous struggles through the lens of native survivance.

Markus Lindner, Buffalo Bill’s “Indians’ Gaze Back: Europe and Europeans in Arthur Amiotte’s Collages. Lindner focused Lakota artist Arthur Amiotte, who connects his family history – including that of his Austrian great-grandmother – with the general history of the Lakotas of the early reservation period.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT:
The Entangled Gaze Website
The Savage Hits Back Revisited
The Savage Hits Back Revisited review

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

SSHRC Logo

Creator: 
Image of Paul Kane painting juxtaposed against an ivory Haida carving of a "Sea Captain Figure"
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 1:30pm
Lab Member: 
Gerald Mcmaster
Tak Pham

Meet the Crazy Plate Lady

Visit the studio of Resident Artist at The Ritz-Carlton in Toronto and OCAD U alum Jacqueline Poirier, known as Instagram's Crazy Plate Lady. Video created by OCAD U student Olga Kholod.

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PAPER TRAIL

Saturday, January 27, 2018 - 11:00am to Friday, February 23, 2018 - 12:30pm

IAMD candidate Dasha Valakhanovitch (MFA 2018) is a participating artist in the upcoming exhibition "PAPER TRAIL". This pop-up exhibition features paper-based art and runs from Saturday, January 27th - Friday, February 23rd, (hours: Thu-Sun 11AM-5PM).

Please feel free to check out the amazing work of these artists!

Venue & Address: 
Lonsdale Gallery - 410 Spadina Rd, Toronto, ON
Website: 
http://app.akimbo.ca/#/events/115381

Visit Toronto studio Moss & Lam

Visit Toronto's Moss & Lam, an amazing art studio that creates custom artwork, wall surfaces and installation for some of the world's top designers. The firm's founder and many of its artists are OCAD Universty alum. 

Video created by OCAD U student Olga Kholod

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Come Up To My Room - The Gladstone Hotel

Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 10:00am to Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 3:00pm

Congratulations to our current Interdisciplinary Master's in Art, Media and Design MDes student Katrina Tompkins, IAMD alumni Ashley Snook (MFA 2016) and Digital Futures alumni Jordan Shaw (MFA 2017) who will be showcasing their work at the Gladstone Hotel's upcoming event "Come Up To My Room".

"Come Up To My Room (#CUTMR) is an alternative design exhibition that provides a platform for experimentation outside the norms of art and design, at the edges between intention and interpretation. Freed from the constraints of traditional practice, CUTMR encourages spatial exploration that engages our senses, our memories and our perceptions of reality. The exhibition challenges participants to push their everyday practice by offering a blank canvas upon which to explore new themes and ways of working. Framed within the backdrop of the historic 128-year-old Gladstone Hotel, CUTMR invites artists and designers to create site-specific, immersive installations that stimulate the imagination and encourage discussion and dialogue between contributors and visitors alike."

For full description and more information please visit:

http://www.gladstonehotel.com/spaces/cutmr2018/

 

CUTMR will be taking place on January 18-21, 2018

January 20, 7-10PM - Opening Reception & Party

January 20, 10PM-late - LOVE DESIGN Party (Opening After Party)

January 21, 1-3PM - TSA Ideas Forum (TO DO)

 

 

Venue & Address: 
The Gladstone Hotel
Website: 
http://www.gladstonehotel.com/spaces/cutmr2018/
2018 CUTMR Poster

The Joy of Laser Cutting

Friday, December 1, 2017 - 12:00pm to Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 6:00pm

Laser cutters are powerful and versatile tools that can introduce significant untapped potential to artists. However, currently available learning materials for working with these machines are not designed with artists’ needs or interests in mind. To address this gap, Alda developed the Joy of Laser Cutting, a project based on her own experience as an artist looking to engage with these machines. This project uses recipes, food and visual language from the world of cookery as tools to reframe online DIY tutorials and appeal to the interests and needs of artists while encouraging creative engagement with the material. This show presents the work that was developed for the Joy of Laser Cutting as well as the journey that led Alda to develop it in the first place.

 

Venue & Address: 
Graduate Gallery - 205 Richmond St W.
The Joy of Laser Cutting Exhibition Poster

Yorkville Village Arts Festival

Yorkville VIllage Arts Festival logo
Friday, November 3, 2017 - 10:00am to Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 6:00pm

In the best spirit of artistic collaboration, the Yorkville Village Arts Festival is a joint initiative between First Capital Realty and Faculty of Art at OCAD University. Held annually at Yorkville Village, this cultural event showcases contemporary art works and events to promote the arts and cultural exchange in the heart of Toronto’s historic Yorkville district.

The Festival is a “one of a kind” project developed between FCR and OCAD U that features a juried exhibition of art by OCAD U students and recent graduates and a set of dynamic events that are programmed exclusively for the festival during the six-day event.

 

Artists:

Kaiatanoron Bush

Jasmine Cardenas

Tia Cavanagh

Chief Lady Bird

Hudson Christie

Michelle Cieloszczyk

Nicholas Crombach

Nicole Del Medico

Fiona Evans

Simon Falk

Jana Ghalayini

Mike Goldby

Brian Harvey

John Holland

Lindsay Kerrigan Holton

Kenny Lam

Vanessa Maltese

Pablo Oh

Pasi Paltanen

Rajni Perera

Wei Qi

David Constantino Salazar

Michael Seleski

Virginia Gail Smith

Louis-Philippe Tremblay-Chapdelaine

Quentin VerCetty

Alex Wood

Alex Yardley

 

Venue & Address: 
Yorkville Village, 55 Avenue Rd, Toronto
Yorkville Village Arts Festival flyer

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