Workshop: Surviving Art School - Toolkit for Artists & Designers of Colour

collage image of artwork attributed to Raju Rage
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 3:30pm

Surviving Art School: An Artist of Colour Toolkit
with artist + activist Raju Rage

Thursday, 14 September 2017, 3:30–5 PM
Lambert Lounge (MCA 187), 100 McCaul St
OCAD University

Co-presented with the Office of Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives and OCAD Student Union
Hot Lunch will be served starting at 2:30pm ($3 suggested for meal)

Using the 'Surviving the Art School' publication, produced by Collective Creativity (of which Rage is a member) and published by Nottingham Contemporary (UK), as a starting point, the talk and workshop will ask what this visually entails. During this workshop participants can expect to learn and share strategies for decolonising education. Participants are encouraged to bring with them a 'problem' of the institution to collectively strategise and create a surviving the art school toolkit. This workshop is open to students from all disciplines. 

A presentation of Collective Creativity: a Queer, Trans* Intersex People of Colour artist collective in London UK which aims to create radical, grass roots space for QTIPOC to interrogate the politics of art, in relation to queer identity, institutional racism, and anti-colonialism. CC is dedicated to creating space for conversations that challenge institutional racism and white supremacy within a cultural framework. We are concerned with how we decolonise our art educations, unlearn the histories that replicate the colonial gaze, re-formatting our own art educations and a re-positioning of this canon by re-centring artists and cultural producers of colour.

Raju Rage is an interdisciplinary artist who is proactive about using art, education and activism to forge creative survival. Based in London and working beyond, they primarily use their non-conforming body as a vehicle of embodied knowledge; to bridge the gap between dis/connected bodies, theory and practice, text and the body and aesthetics and the political substance. They work in performance, sculpture, soundscapes and moving image, focusing on techniques of resistance and utilising everyday objects and everyday life experiences in communicating narratives around gender, race and culture. They investigate history, memory and trauma, with an emphasis on colonial legacy, its continuation and impact on the body and contemporary diasporan identity. They are an organiser and member of Collective Creativity arts collective. 

For any accessibility accommodation requests to fully participate in this event, please contact Shamina Chherawala at schherawala@ocadu.ca or 416.977.6000 ext.3840 in advance.

Venue & Address: 
Thursday, September 14 at 3:30 PM - 5 PM Lambert Lounge, 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/306759276454557/
Email: 
schherawala@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416.977.6000 ext.3840
Cost: 
Workshop is free! OCAD Student Union will be serving Hot Lunch from 2:30pm onwards (suggested $3)

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Art + Feminism Edit a Thon
Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 11:00am to 4:00pm

This Edit-a-Thon kicks off at 11:00 am with a conversation on contemporary feminism, ceramics, and community featuring artists Janet Macpherson and Helen Cho, and moderated by Karine Tsoumis, Curator, Gardiner Museum. 

Following the discussion, participants are encouraged to form breakout groups and spend the afternoon ensuring a gender inclusive history within Wikipedia’s vast database.

 

You can register here.

Venue & Address: 
Gardiner Museum. 111 Queens Park, Toronto ON
Website: 
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/art-feminism-wikipedia-edit-a-thon-tickets-31884793275

Project 31

Project 31
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 6:00pm

Project 31 is an auction event offering up stunning paintings, photography, multi-media work, sculptures, illustration and digital media by OCAD University’s talented faculty members and alumni. Participating artists choose an area of need they wish to support through the sale of their work, such as scholarships, bursaries for students in financial need or the purchase of specialized studio equipment. Through the auction, guests are able to access work by OCAD U’s award-winning faculty members and alumni — a pool of creative talent found nowhere else in Canada — while enriching the learning experience for the next generation of artists and designers.

 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

OCAD University
100 McCaul Street 
The Great Hall, Second Floor
Toronto, ON

6:00 p.m. Reception
7:30 p.m. Live Auction

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul. St., The Great Hall, Second Floor, Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://ocadu.ca/project31
Email: 
imedel@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416.977.6000 x 4861
Cost: 
$125.00
Keywords: 

Principles of Clay Workshop with Jade Reyes

A cartoon with two sections - on the left a person thinking of an idea, on the right, that person sharing the idea with others
Tuesday, March 7, 2017 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm

Join us for the first in our 5-part workshop series of creative art & design workshops taught by OCAD U students... who are paid for their work and time :D. 

Principles of Clay Workshop with Jade Reyes:
Using three methods of forming clay pieces, such as pinching, coiling, and slapbuilding, students will learn how to make basic clay shapes and experience the plasticity, shrinkage, and the texture of clay. Students should wear old clothes that they don’t care might get dirty. All materials will be provided. 

Workshops are open to current students at OCAD U.

This workshop series is presented in partnership by the OCAD U Library's Learning Zone and the Writing & Learning Centre and supported by funding from the First Generation Program, administered by the WLC.

Venue & Address: 
Learning Zone 113 McCaul Street, Level 1 Also accessible from 122 St. Patrick Street
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/events/170094870164019/
Email: 
mchudolinska@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 ext. 2529
Cost: 
FREE

For This Land: Inside Elemental

Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 12:00pm to Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 6:00pm

Onsite Gallery at OCAD University’s stunning new location at 199 Richmond St. W. includes a Category A designed exhibition space and media lounge as well as collection storage, study and exhibition zones. We are excited to inaugurate this 8,000 square-foot build with the following major exhibitions:
 

For This Land: Inside Elemental 
2Ro Media: Jackson 2bears and Janet Rogers
Presented with community partner imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

For this Land: Inside Elemental is part of a multi-project series by 2Ro Media,  comprised of Jackson 2bears and Janet Rogers—both Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) artists from Six Nations of the Grand River. The artists, who currently live outside their traditional territory, produce work collaboratively about ‘returning home’, which typically involves creating site-specific narratives using video, sound, poetry, performance and multi-media installation.

With Inside Elemental, the artists engage in a series of conversations with the Kana:ta Village on traditional Haudenosaunee territory in order to create an immersive multimedia installation using sound, video, performance and digital languages. Inside Elemental is an exploration of the internalization of one’s traditional territory, and in general about how external environments are deeply intertwined with identity, self-understanding, and the interiority of personal and collective experience. The exhibition brochure is available online here.

Also on view is raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000 - 2015).

For This Land: Inside Elemental


Jackson 2bears is a Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) multimedia installation/performance artist and cultural theorist originally from Six Nations of the Grand River. He is currently based in Lethbridge, Alberta. Since 1999, 2bears has exhibited his work extensively across Canada in public galleries, museums and artist-run centres, as well as internationally, in festivals and in group exhibitions.

Janet Rogers is a Mohawk/Tuscarora writer from Six Nations of the Grand River. She was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, and has lived in Stoney Creek, Hamilton and Toronto, Ontario. She has been living as a guest on the traditional lands of the Coast Salish people in Victoria, British Columbia, since 1994. Janet works in the genres of poetry, spoken word performance poetry, video poetry and recorded poetry with music. Janet is also a radio broadcaster, a documentary producer, and a media and sound artist.

imagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival
imagineNATIVE is the international centre for Indigenous-made media arts. Through year-round presentation, promotion and professional development activities, it is committed to a greater understanding by audiences of Indigenous peoples, cultures, and artistic expressions.

Public Events
- Saturday, September 23, 4 p.m.: Canadian Art Magazine’s Gallery Day with talk by Lindsay Nixon
- Saturday, September 30, 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.: Nuit Blanche at Onsite Gallery
- Tuesday, October 10, 7 p.m.: Lisa Myers Artist Talk
- Friday, October 20, 5 p.m.: imagineNATIVE Art Crawl Kick-Off
- Saturday, November 4, 2 p.m.: Mark Igloliorte Artist Talk
- Thursday, November 16, 12 to 4 p.m.: Wiki-Edit-a-Thon with the Inuit Artist Database
- Thursday, November 16, 6 p.m.: Panel Talk: Indigenous Tattoo Revitalization with Native Women in the Arts
- Saturday, December 2, 2 p.m.: Land Claims: raise a flag Pennant Workshop and Artist Presentation
- Sunday, December 3, 2 p.m.: Indigenous Art Today: Lindsay Nixon & Ryan Rice

Supporters

Onsite Gallery gratefully acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W.
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000, Ext. 456
Cost: 
FREE
Janet Rogers and Jackson 2bears
Supporters

Shipping container exhibition in Butterfield Park tackles sexual violence

Colourful container with "It's Never OK" on the side
Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 5:00am

This fall, OCAD U students responded to the issue of sexual violence by participating in a workshop series that culminated as a traveling exhibition, Unknotted — the OCAD U activation of Sexual Assault: The Roadshow.  Led by professor Lillian Allen and sexual assault activist Jane Doe, the exhibition features community-led art that responds to sexual violence across the province. It remains in Butterfield park through November 25. 

Participating students, from across several disciplines, focused on building a nuanced understanding of social justice, oppression, consent culture and bystander intervention to resist and reimagine sexual violence in the OCAD U community.  At the container, situated in Butterfield Park, visitors view an evolving fabric installation representing four grounding principles of by-stander intervention. Visitors can navigate the space and share an experience, ask questions, send a message or co-sign their commitment to responding to sexual violence, by tying written messages into the fabric of the installation.

The retrofitted container will travel on a flatbed truck to 15 cities/areas in Ontario over a three-year period. At each stop, local artists will work with anti-violence experts and community participants to create, curate and exhibit art that “talks back” to sexual assault.

The project was facilitated by Sheila Sampath, assistant professor in the Faculty of Design and creative director at The Public Studio and sponsored by OCAD U’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Working Group.  The project was created and informed by OCAD U students Wil Brask, Leilah Dhoré, Morgan Elena, L-fy Delgado, Natalie Mark, Dana McCool, Khadijah Morley, Lizz Khan and Francis Tompkins.

Learn more about OCAD U’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Working Group

 

Poster: 
Banners inside the exhibition
Students standing in front of the exhibition

Art & Health

As Artist in Residence at Baycrest (2012) Judith Doyle worked with neuropsychologists Dr. Brian Richards and Dr. Eva Svaboda and the clients of Memory Link, a program developing assistive technologies and training for people experiencing memory loss as a result of Acquired Brain Injury.

FUNDING: Artists in the Community and Workplace, Ontario Arts Council

As Artist in Residence at Baycrest (2012) Judith Doyle worked with neuropsychologists Dr. Brian Richards and Dr. Eva Svaboda and the clients of Memory Link, a program developing assistive technologies and training for people experiencing memory loss as a result of Acquired Brain Injury. During the residency, Doyle conducted interviews and worked collaboratively with clients on media montage representing their experiences. The collaboration continued for more than a year and culminated in an exhibition entitled Pathfinding which portrayed the perceptual experiences of memory loss in images combining natural branching phenomenon and scans of neuro-pathways. Pathfinding was installed at Baycrest Health Sciences in a high-traffic, publicly accessible space near the elevators to the Apotex seniors' residence, next to a cafeteria, at the base of a busy elevator and hallway. Composited imagery played on an array of vintage TVs, each with its own soundtrack or "voice". 

The artist collaborators included Doyle and Robin Len, Emad Dabiri and Kang-Il Kim, with sound by Paul Geldart. Robin and Kang have difficulty storing and retrieving new memories (anterograde amnesia) resulting from Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). All of the team are experienced media artists and compositors and drew from this experience, enlisting embodied memory through artistic collaboration. In September 2012, the project relocated from Baycrest to the Social Media and Collaboration Lab (SMAClab) at 230 Richmond West at OCADU. After the exhibition at Baycrest, the work was subsequently presented at the Inclusive Design Institute at OCAD University and at the artist-run centre HAVN (Hamilton Audio-Visual Node) with support from Brain Injury Services of Hamilton (BISH).

LINKS

Worldviews Conference presentation on Memory Link collaboration  at TIFF Bell Lightbox by Judith Doyle 2013 http://readingpictures.com/worldviews.pdf

Feature: Aging in the 21st Century: Judith Doyle & Baycrest http://www.baycrest.org/Breakthroughs/winter2010/Features.asp

Pathfinding Exhibition Opening at Baycrest 2013 http://vimeo.com/60362578

image of works
poster image
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 2:00pm
Lab Member: 
Judith Doyle
Emad Dabiri

INTERSECTION: Entrepreneurship & Indigenous Art Conference

INTERSECTION is a unique gathering of Indigenous artists, entrepreneurs, academics and students, telling success stories. The keynote speaker is Dr. Jessica Metcalfe. Stemming from enduring appropriation of Indigenous material culture, Dr. Metcalfe will speak about how her blog Beyond Buckskin applied entrepreneurship as a platform to address local and global social issues. Three distinct panels will expand discussions on emerging business ideas and social innovation approaches. A series of practical workshops using design thinking and a NEW flourishing business model methods will allow attendees to practice and test their ideas for scaling up and sustainability.

The conference will:

  • Highlight successful examples of Triple bottom line (Financial, Social, Environmental) enterprises
  • Provide practical tools and workshops for students and aspiring entrepreneurs
  • Provide success stories of income generation for organizations looking for ways to replace government funding
  • Address intersections and breakdown barriers between creative and business types
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Event Program
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Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 2:00pm to Sunday, November 16, 2014 - 10:00pm

Art and Interactive Projections: Tentacles

This research employs interactive public video projection to explore emerging social constructions involving play and ad hoc communities. In these installations the viewer is encouraged to participate in unstructured play. As with every interactive experience (and in fact, most other things in life) there is the initial satisfaction resulting from simply figuring out how one’s decisions, gestures and actions cause reactions and create effects in the surrounding environment.

The interplay of scale – the small screen in the palm of one’s hand contrasted with the large public screen on the facade of a building – parallels other central human experiences. The intimacy of touch, for example, is contrasted by the dominance of projected, broadcast visual stimuli, while the screen – the sign – forms a kind of text waiting to be read. Your personal space simultaneously shrinks and expands as the tiny gestures you make with your fingers are magnified for all to see. Public and private stand in stark contrast, highlighting dichotomies like wireless and wired, perception and cognition, knowing and being.

Operating from within the crowd, viewers or players had the opportunity to step onto the stage of the projected environment – to display themselves in action, engaged with other virtual beings. Movements, gestures and displays become part of this spontaneous public performance, suggestive of the activity on a dance floor, where typical rules about decorum, reservation, engagement with strangers and physical contact are suspended. Each private, gestural experience is amplified publicly as a by-product of being within a crowd. Taking action in public in this way constitutes one layer in the creation of community. Our behaviours and others’ meld to generate simultaneous effects, creating a joint awareness that forms the cornerstone of our collectivity.

Play is presented as a free-form, creative activity – a childlike enthrallment with exploration, skill-learning and sharing. The scale and location of the displays encourages parallel play and the growing awareness of the activities of other players nearby. The public nature of the experience creates the opportunity for ambient performance, where other players’ awareness of you subtly influences and rewards your behaviour. Finally, these factors combine with the ambiguous structures and activities built into each project to encourage social play and collaboration in an emerging, shared activity.

http://www.tentacles.ca
 

Exhibitions
Talk to MeMuseum of Modern ArtNew York City, USA, July – November 2011
Transmission, GLOBAL SUMMIT 2011Victoria, Canada, February 2011
MediaCity 2010, Bauhaus UniversityWeimar, Germany, October 2010
Festival du nouveau cinemaMontreal, Canada, October 2010
Mobilefest, Museum of Image and SoundSao Paulo, Brazil, September 2010
Nuit Blanche, Lennox Contemporary GalleryToronto, Canada, October 2009

Publications
Geoffrey Shea and Michael Longford. Large Screens and Small Screens: Public and Private Engagement with Urban Projections. Media City: Interaction of Architecture, Media and Social Phenomena. J. Geelhaar, F. Eckardt, B. Rudolf, S. Zierold, M. Markert (Eds.) Bauhaus-Universität, Weimar, Germany, 201-210, 2010
Geoffrey Shea, Michael Longford, Elaine Biddiss. Art and Play in Interactive Projections: Three Perspectives. ISEA, Istanbul, 2011
Geoffrey Shea and Michael Longford. Identity Play in an Artistic, Interactive Urban Projection. CHI Workshop: Large Displays in Urban Life, Vancouver, 2011

Presentations
M. Longford, Connecting Talent in Digital Media, MITACS and the NCE GRAND, Mississauga, Canada, September 2010
M. Longford, “Digital Media: Successes and Accomplishments in Canadian Digital Media Research,” Canada 3.0, Stratford, Canada, May 2010
R. King, International Centre for Art and New Technologies (CIANT), Prague, Czech Republic, March 2010
G. Shea, Mobile Experience Innovation Centre (MEIC), Ontario College of Art and Design University, Toronto, Canada, February 2010
G. Shea, M. Longford, R. King, Discovery 2010, Ontario Centres of Excellence, Toronto, Canada, May 2010
R. King, Music in a Global Village Conference, Budapest, Hungary, December 2009
M. Longford, G. Shea, iPhone Developer's Group, Augmented Reality Lab, York University, Toronto, Canada, November 2009
M. Longford, Project Demonstration - A New Media Gathering, Town of Markham, Markham, Canada – October 2009
M. Longford, “Tentacles: Design, Technology and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Mobile Media Lab” PEKING/YORK SYMPOSIUM: Interdisciplinarity, Art and Technology, York University, Toronto, Canada, October 2009
G. Shea, “Artifact or Experience: Presenting Network Mediated Objects,” Interacting with Immersive Worlds, Brock University, St. Catharines, Canada, June 2009

Image of people looking abstract images projected on a wall
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 4:30pm
Lab Member: 
Rob King
Micheal Langford
Geoffrey Shea
Ken Leung
David Green

Art and Ability: Cardinal

This project begins to examine the special physical needs of individuals with complex disabilities through the lens of their artistic and expressive needs. It proposes to develop and incorporate an art/research methodology, including stages of creation and analysis of prototypical tools to address these overlapping needs of the participants. It is anticipated that these newly developed tools will have potential benefits for a broader spectrum of the user’s needs, as well as for other users with or without disabilities. This iterative inquiry will take the form of collaborative art creation sessions involving both researcher/artists and participant/artists with severe physical disabilities. Analysis of the impediments to these exercises in self expression will guide the rapid development of new, prototypical, art making tools, techniques or materials. At the conclusion of the research, we will examine the effectiveness of the art/research methodology in refining and addressing the emerging research question of how communication models can be developed and employed for artistic expression by individuals with disabilities, and how they can be applied to their other communication needs.

Cardinal: Eye Gesture Screenless Communication System

Several observations of current eye-gaze and eye-gesture systems point towards the potential benefits of a low strain,computer-assisted, natural tool for users with eye control as their primary means of communicating.

The three existing systems include early Bliss boards, myTobii computers and the Eye Writer. These are the salient features of each:

The Bliss board was a physical tool that allowed a trained user to communicate with a trained “listener” through eye gestures. A 2-3 foot square sheet of clear Plexiglas had the centre cut out, leaving a frame about 6 inches wide. The two conversants would face each other. The square grid around the frame contained cells with a square grid of alphabetic characters. I.e. the top left cell might contain the letters A, B, C, D, E, F, arranged in a grid. The user would use a two-gesture glance to instruct the listener about the letter choice. Up and to the right, followed by up and to the left might combine to signify the upper right letter in the upper left square.

Two features stand out with this system. First, the goal of communicating with a listener is enhanced by having the face-to-face view of the conversants uninterrupted. I.e. they look at each other through the large hole in the centre of the board and glance to the edges of their field of gaze to signal alphabetic letters. Second, once both users have become accustomed to the system, the board itself can be removed and the pattern of eye gestures can still be interpreted.

In its early usage, the communicator is might look at the squares in question, but later they just gesture towards the squares, whether they are physically there or not. This sparks a differentiation between eye-gaze (looking) and eye-gesture (glancing).

The myTobii uses infrared cameras to track the communicators gaze, and maps it to a flexible set of on-screen buttons. The camera and motion tracking software create a very workable tool. Unfortunately the computer screen must constantly be the focus of the communicators gaze, and effectively becomes a barrier between the conversants. In theory, the cameras could track eye gestures that go beyond the edges of the screen. A “pause” feature used to be activated by glancing down beyond the bottom edge of the screen, although that feature seems to be gone.

The Eye Writer glasses uses an eye tracking system that is not linked to a particular on-screen representation. In its fist instantiation it was used with an onscreen software program to facilitate graffiti tagging, but the glasses themselves (the input device) are not linked to any screen, the way the myTobii is.

The synthesis of these systems suggests a model in which a user could use their eyes to gesture towards abstract referents – hypothetical buttons which exist outside of the field of attention. So a user might look at a conversation partner and then glance left and right, which would be interpreted by a computer vision system as the letter D. Right and left might be O. Up and left might be G. But because the communicator never attends to an onscreen representation, they are able to assess the impact of what they are saying, word by word, as we do in normal speech. Rather than having to type out an entire phrase (while ignoring the conversation partner) and then playing it back, with a highly intermediated effect.

In the first test, the object of attention (a Google map) is situated in the middle of the screen, where the user can study it at will without triggering any buttons (which would be the case with the myTobii system). Glancing towards any edge causes the map to scroll in that direction. Glances are triggered by a “mouse-over” effect, which does not require the user to look at, pause on, or otherwise fixate on a button. A simple glance suffices.

A subsequent instantiation will allow the user to wear EyeWriter glasses and look at a physical symbol board to spell words. After rudimentary training, we will test if the user can continue to spell by glancing with their eyes, without the presence of the board.

Further open source software and hardware models will explore if there is a sub-$100 device which could be produced to facilitate communication (and control) without the presence of a computer screen.

 

Publications & Presentations

Alexandra Haagaard, Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: Typing with Low-Specificity Eye Gestures and Velocity Detection. International Workshop on Pervasive Eye Tracking and Mobile Eye-Based Interaction, Sweden, 2013. (under review)

Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Alexandra Haagaard, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: An Eye Gesture Based Communication System. Best Poster Award: Eye Tracking Conference on Behavioral Research, Boston, 2013.

Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Alexandra Haagaard, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: An Eye Gesture Based Communication System. Demo and Talk: Disrupting Undoing: Constructs of Disability, Toronto, 2013.

Shea, G. and A. Haagaard. Artists Reflecting on Their Practice and Disability, Ethnographica Journal on Culture and Disability, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, (under review).

Shea, G., Understanding the Work of Artists with Diverse Abilities: Applying Art, Design, Ethnography and Computer Science. Research Rendezvous, OCAD University, Toronto, 2012.

Shea, G., Art and Disability Research. A presentation to the Doctoral Program at SmartLab, Dublin, 2012.

Keywords: 
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Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 4:30pm
Lab Member: 
Geoffrey Shea
Alexandra Haagaard
Tahireh Lal

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