Creative Directors' Speakers Series: #2 It Takes All Types To Do The Job

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 11:30pm to Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 1:30am

Does one size of (AD GRAD) fit all?

Creative Directors from Public Relations, Digital, traditional Ad agency, experiential and branding firms come and share their work, perspective and insights:

Our panel:

Joel Arbez – Executive Creative Director , Grey Canada
Jon Toews – former Executive Creative Director, Critical Mass
Andrew Simon – Executive Creative Director, Edelman Canada
Jonathan Smith – Executive Creative Director, Pigeon Branding
Graham Lee – T1 Agency, Chief Creative Officer, CD at T1 Motion

Q & A to follow.

Brought to you by the Advertising Program, OCADU.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street, Room 190 (Auditorium)
Cost: 
Free
Creative Director Speakers Series

David Thorne

David started the firm in 1994 after working for several years at other corporate design firms in the Toronto area. Over the twenty years, he has served a wide variety of clients from many diverse industries and expanded the types of services he provides to offer more integrated communications across many different media. A believer in simple, conceptual ideas, he approaches his work with passion and great enthusiasm never loosing sight of the client's marketing goals.

A new take on the Vegas Golden Knights logo

Vegas Golden Knights logo
Vegas Golden Knights secondary logo

OCAD University advertising student Matt Doyle has a new take on the Vegas Golden Knights logo. 

"After watching the unveiling for the NHL's newest expansion, Vegas Golden Knights, I and many others were quite disappointed with the outcome of the logo. Dull colours and concept left the feeling of the logo very unappealing. For a team in Vegas, the colour and concept of the design should speak for itself with brightness and a simplistic complexity in the layout," says Matt. "I chose to not only do a primary crest, featured with the full knight figure, but also a secondary crest, featured with the circular layout that can be used for not only the jersey crest but also as a shoulder patch." 

"By brightening up the colours and adding some much needed complexity and 'loudness' to the design, I feel I have made a fairly decent attempt at a suggestion for a rebrand of the team," says Matt.

Primary logo

 

Secondary logo

Template: 
Inline Image Template
Department: 

Orangina Originals Competition

Orangina Originals
Thursday, October 16, 2008 - 4:00am to Thursday, November 6, 2008 - 5:00am

Since its introduction in the 1930s, Orangina has become a cultural icon. As one of Europe’s favourite sparkling citrus beverages, Orangina is celebrated as much for its distinctive taste as for its rich, artistic heritage.

In fact, in the 1950s French artist Bernard Villemot was so inspired by the joie de vivre of Orangina that he put his paintbrush to work, creating a collection of lively Orangina advertising posters. His work gained international fame, elevating the brand’s iconic status and creating a cult-like following for Orangina artwork that continues today.

Building on this tradition, Orangina is searching for original, one-of-a-kind, Canadian artwork through its first ever Orangina Originals student competition. The Ontario College of Art & Design (“OCAD”) students are invited to follow in the footsteps of Villemot and submit original Orangina-inspired artwork for a chance to win.

One artist will receive a grand prize of $15,000 which includes a bursary prize and purchase of the original artwork plus exclusive reproduction rights buy-out. The winning artist will be revealed at OCAD Whodunit? on November 19 and limited edition reproductions of their work will be sold throughout December 2008 to benefit OCAD.

A secondary prize bursary of $1,000 will also be awarded on November 22, 2008.

About Orangina
Comprised of the combination of orange, lemon and mandarin juices, Orangina blends juice and real pulp with pure sparkling water for a fresh taste that has made it one of Europe’s favourite beverages for more than 70 years.

HOW TO ENTER
To enter, visit www.whodunitoriginals.com during the Competition Period, print and complete the Competition Entry Form in full and submit with your entry to Orangina Originals, Attention: Rebecca Crittenden, c/o 184 Front Street East, 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5A 4N3. A short paragraph/bio about the entrant must also be included with the entry and completed entry form.

A separate entry form must accompany each piece submitted.

Entries must be two-dimensional and should be completed on an 11x17 inch surface. Work of any other proportions, or that is not two-dimensional will be disqualified and will not be accepted. Two-dimensional pieces can be horizontal or vertical. All works should be unframed and without mats.
Artwork must be Orangina-inspired.

Limit five (5) entries per person during the Competition Period.

JUDGING
All eligible entries submitted into the Competition will be judged by a panel of OCAD and Orangina representatives (the “Judges”) between November 6, 2008 and November 12, 2008. The first prize winner will be determined based on the following criteria:
• Expression of the Orangina spirit: 40 per cent
• Overall creativity: 15 per cent
• Technique: 15 per cent
• Artistic merit: 15 per cent
• Originality: 15 per cent

For complete contest details visit: www.whodunitoriginals.com

Cost: 
Free

Frederick Burbach Sabbatical Presentation

Image with the Swiss flag
Tuesday, February 10, 2015 - 9:00pm to 10:00pm

Faculty of Design

Faculty Sabbatical Talk presented by: Frederick Burbach, Associate Professor of Communication Design (Graphic Design, Typography & Branding).

Frederick Jon Burbach is Associate Professor of Communication Design (Graphic Design, Typography, & Branding). In addition to his academic career Burbach has worked for more than 30 years in brand development and design for clients in Europe and North America. His experiences include Deutsche Telekom, BMW, Swisscom, Swiss Bank Corporation, SIG Group, EniChem, Muller Martini AG, Rieter AG, PepsiAmericas, Diebold, and Steelcase. Since 2010, his branding practice is in support of organizations for the betterment of humanity including Aarya Ltd., and Singing Cities Ltd., in the United Kingdom, and Pelikan Environmental Solutions in the United Arab Emirates. Burbach’s research interests are in brand development, design fundamentals, history of typography, letterform design, and Swiss poster design. His personal creative practice focuses on the integration of typographic forms with photography. His Sabbatical Talk will address a range of research, practice, and personal creative projects. Writing and the codification intellectual capital around professional practice, design history, theory, and criticism will be discussed. Central to his sabbatical year effort is his forthcoming book on strategic brand development Form Follows Strategy: Strategic, Structured, and Sustainable Brand Development for Organizations.

Venue & Address: 
113 McCaul Street Room 1516 - (5th Floor)
Cost: 
Free

Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition disrupts the personal brand

Untitled (Tennis Balls) by Claire Fontaine. Image courtesy Onsite [at] OCAD U.

“Today more than ever, artists and arts professionals are under pressure to build their personal reputations and capitalize on their social relationships. Networking, CV building and being seen at the right events around the globe with the right people, we must constantly promote the brand called You.” Helena Reckitt, curator

What was your most recent status update on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr? Did it reflect your personal brand as an artist? Were you trying to represent yourself? Do you feel pressure to create and maintain a certain identity online? If you’ve ever asked yourself what authorship and identity mean for an artist in the social media era, the Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition on Onsite [at] OCAD U may disrupt some of your assumptions (and/or amuse you).  

“In a prestigious field of contemporary art, where a steady stream of workers, interns and volunteers seems prepared to labour for low or even no wages, the notion that work is its own reward has led to dangerous levels of exploitation and self-exploitation.”

Stepping into the Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition is like entering oppositeland. The exhibition rejects our contemporary expectations of artists, their work, markers of authenticity and shows no investment in what Helena Reckitt, the curator of the exhibition, calls the stock of “heroic artistic self-expression.” Instead, we see work that obscures, delegates, distributes or withdraws the conventional signs of authorship and artistic subjectivity.

The Paris-based collective artist Claire Fontaine presents “Untitled,” an installation of tennis balls with small slits or mouths that hold smuggled prisoner contraband (and yes, their placement on the gallery floor is designed to trip you and add an element of instability to the installation). 

Heath Bunting’s “Identity Bureau, Transferrable Synthetic British Natural Person” comprises library and travel cards to create legal evidence of a fabricated identity.

Janez Janša, Janez Janša and Janez Janša, who changed their names to that of the Slovenian Prime Minister, question the role of the artist’s name in building reputation and cultural capital in a video in which they show proof of their political, financial and legal identities.

Jesse Darling’s “Darling’s Room With Lyrics [Karaoke Vape Version RAW]” is a video adaptation of “Marvin’s Room” by R&B singer Drake that includes personal text messages as a forum for the performance of self. A live mic in the gallery encourages others to sing along.

Together, the installations by the 11 artists and artist collectives in Getting Rid of Ourselves explore how desires and subjectivities can be directed away from work:

“In order to recover life’s liberating vitality, they explore the need for us to stop treating our affective worlds and relationships as commodities. Only then can we halt work’s steady seepage into our every moment and relationship, and figure out what it really means to get a life.”

Getting Rid of Ourselves runs until October 11.

Quotes excerpted from Helena Reckitt’s essay, “Getting Rid of Ourselves.” Visit the gallery for a copy of the full text.

Find out more

Upcoming events as part of Getting Rid of Ourselves 

Helena Reckitt 

Onsite [at] OCAD U 

Getting Rid of Ourselves

Getting Rid of Ourselves
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - 4:00am to Saturday, October 11, 2014 - 4:00am

Curated by London, UK-based independent curator and critic Helena Reckitt

Artists: Becky Beasley, Adrian Blackwell, Heath Bunting, Jesse Darling, Kajsa Dahlberg, Claire Fontaine, Goldin+Senneby, Janez Janša, Janez Janša, Janez Janša [sic], Kernel.

Opening Talk:
Wednesday, July 16, 6:30 p.m.
Claire Fontaine presented in partnership with the Consulat général de France à Toronto
Room 190/Auditorium
100 McCaul Street, Toronto

Opening Reception:
Wednesday, July 16, 8 to 10 p.m.
Onsite [at] OCAD University
230 Richmond Street West

Getting Rid of Ourselves presents artists and artistic collaborations whose work variously obscures, delegates, withdraws or in other ways complicates the conventional signs of authorship and identity. By questioning investments in art as proof of self-expression — through tactics of anonymity, collective agency, shared authorship, appropriated identities, delegated curating and art making, and financial speculation — works in the exhibition highlight how subjectivity has been treated as a form of living currency to exploit, market and sell to.

More Events:
All begin at Onsite, 230 Richmond Street West

Curator's talk with Helena Reckitt
Saturday, July 19, 1 p.m.

Artists Survival Workshop led by irational.org
Sunday, July 20, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Let's Get Lost - A Reading Group on the Dismantling of Subjects and Spaces
Hosted by Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy

Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m. (August 5, August 19, September 2, September 16)

Insite Exhibition Tour with Paulette Phillips, OCAD U faculty, Integrated Media
September 24, 6:30 p.m.

Insite Exhibition Tour with Jim Drobnick, OCAD U faculty, Liberal Arts & Sciences
October 1, 6:30 p.m.

Biographies:

British artist Becky Beasley explores relationships between photography and objects, the body and interiority in a way that is highly subjective and yet developed through deep immersion in the thoughts and methods of other artists and writers. Literature is particularly generative for the artist, providing her own work with a place to start from and journey into. She graduated with an MFA from the Royal College of Art in 2002 and her recent solo exhibitions include The Walk... in greenat Laura Bartlett Gallery, London (2014); The Outside at Tate Britain (2012) and Francesca Minini Gallery, Milan (2011); and Setting at Laura Bartlett Gallery, London (2012).

Adrian Blackwell is an artist, designer and urban theorist whose work focuses on the relationship between urban spaces and political/economic forces. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard University and is a full-time faculty member at the University of Waterloo. Blackwell is also a founder and editor of the journal Scapegoat: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy.

Heath Bunting is a contemporary British artist based in Bristol, U.K. His work focuses on the development of open democratic communication systems and social structures on the Internet and in the public space. He came from the street up, passing through (and often revisiting) graffiti, performance, intervention, pirate radio, fax /mail art and BBS systems to become an active participant in the explosion of the Internet. He is co-founder of net.art and has created many accredited works. Bunting's work often explores the porosity of borders, both in physical space and online.

Swedish artist Kajsa Dahlberg has exhibited internationally and studied at the Whitney Independent Study Programme. Several of her projects focus on questions of anonymity and collective subjectivities. In Female Fist, 2006, a video about lesbian feminist porn makers, the filmmakers' voices, but not their faces, appear. For A Room of One's Own: A Thousand Diaries, 2006, Dahlberg created a palimpsest from copies of Virginia Wolf's 1929 book in the Swedish library system. By layering the pages on top of one another, Dahlberg almost submerges the printed text with readers' marginal comments and annotations.

London, U.K.-based Jesse Darling works between performance, installation and the Internet. She has made work for Tumblr and Facebook that explores the Internet as a space for self-fashioning, performance and viral proliferation. She has also performed and exhibited in galleries, including a solo show at London's Arcadia_Missa in 2012. She received her MFA from the Slade School of Art.

Claire Fontaine is a Paris-based collective artist, "founded" in 2004. After lifting her name from a popular brand of school notebooks, Claire Fontaine declared herself a "readymade artist." Her practice interrogates the political impotence and the crisis of singularity that seem to define contemporary art today. But if the artist herself is as displaced, deprived of its use value, and exchangeable as the products she makes, there is always the possibility of the "human strike." Claire Fontaine uses her freshness and youth to make herself a whatever-singularity and an existential terrorist in search of subjective emancipation. She grows up among the ruins of the notion of authorship, experimenting with collective protocols of production, détournements, and the production of various devices for the sharing of intellectual and private property. Recent selected solo exhibitions include Tears, The Jewish Museum, NY (2013); 1493, Espacio 1414, San Juan, Puerto Rico (2013); and Sell Your Debt, Queen's Nails, San Francisco (2013).

Goldin+Senneby is a framework for collaboration set up by Swedish artists Simon Goldin and Jakob Senneby. Since 2004 they have deployed forms of performative and delegated activity to examine legal, economic and spatial constructs. They have made projects for institutions including Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm; Kadist Foundation, Paris; and the Power Plant, Toronto. For their Headless project, Goldin+Senneby explore the notion of "offsite" in financial, aesthetic and political terms.

Janez Janša is a conceptual artist, performer and producer living in Ljubljana, Slovenia. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. He is the author of numerous videos, performances, installations and new media works which have been presented in several exhibitions, festivals and lectures around the world. He is the director of the film My Name Is Janez Janša, co-founder and director of Aksioma - Institute for Contemporary Art, Ljubljana and artistic director of the Aksioma | Project Space (aksioma.org.

Janez Janša is an conceptual artist, writer, performer and director of interdisciplinary performances. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. His socio-political work is focused on relationships between art, society and politics. He is author of the book Jan Fabre: La Discipline du chaos, le chaos de la discipline, Armand Colin, Paris 1994; and was editor in chief of Maska: The Performing Arts Journal, from 1999 to 2006. He is the director of Maska, Institute for Publishing, Production and Education based in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Janez Janša is a visual artist, working in the cross section of traditional visual art practices, conceptual art and new media. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. In 2003 he represented Slovenia at 50th Venice Biennial. Selected exhibitions include the Sao Paolo Biennial, Prague Biennial and Limerick Biennial (zigakariz.com).

Kernel is an art collective founded in 2009 by architect Pegy Zali and artists Petros Moris and Theodoros Giannakis. They live and work between Athens and London. Their practice develops at the intersection of critical research, art, architecture and curating. Kernel has presented solo projects at SPACE, London 2013 and XYZ Outlet, Athens 2011. Selected group exhibitions include Afresh, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens; V22 Young London, V22, London; and the 3rd Athens Biennale - Monodrome, Diplareios School, Athens. They have organized curatorial projects such as Word of Mouth for the 3rd Athens Biennale, Athens; THE PUBLIC SCHOOL in Athens; BYOB London, The Woodmill, London; and Full/Operational/Toolbox, M21, Athens (kerneloperations.com).

Helena Reckitt is a critic and curator based in London, U.K. She was senior curator of Programmes at the Power Plant in Toronto from 2006 to 2010 and since 2011 has been senior lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London. Currently Reckitt is co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Curatorial Studies with Jennifer Fisher on Curating and the Affective Turn, and working with art historian Catherine Grant to develop the group exhibition O Sister, O Shadow.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite [at] OCAD U 230 Richmond St. W. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 Ext. 265

OCAD University announces partnership with Bruce Mau Design

Thursday, September 9, 2010 - 4:00am

Firm to collaborate with institution to create new brand identity

(Toronto — September 9, 2010) At its annual Welcome Back Corn Roast today, OCAD University (OCADU) announced to its students, faculty, staff and volunteers that it has selected respected design firm Bruce Mau Design to develop the university’s new brand identity. The redesign follows the Ontario government’s decision to change the institution’s name from Ontario College of Art & Design to OCAD University this past June.

“We are elated that Bruce Mau Design will design our new brand identity. They are a prescient firm with a proven track record and a potent aesthetic sensibility,” said OCAD University President, Dr. Sara Diamond. “They understand OCADU’s values and teaching philosophies, institutional evolution, and the revolutionizing power of imagination. They place value on the design process itself, as does OCAD University, ensuring that students, staff, faculty, alumni and community stakeholders will be participants in a branding project that is crucial for OCADU, Toronto, Ontario and beyond.

The institution issued a public RFP in July and received numerous submissions in August. After developing a shortlist of firms who delivered presentations to a selection committee, Bruce Mau Design was selected unanimously.

“Bruce Mau Design are expert collaborators. They demonstrated a strong commitment to work with our community to design the process that will drive the outcome of our partnership, and this is of utmost importance to our stakeholders,” said Marketing & Communications Director Steve Virtue. “They implicitly understand OCADU’s rich history, and how our community’s many stories inform the creation of innovating new ideas.”

“We are truly thrilled to have been selected by OCAD University to help develop their new brand identity,” said Hunter Tura, President and CEO of Bruce Mau Design. “I am particularly excited by this collaboration, as I feel that we have put together a great design team — led by Associate Creative Director Laura Stein and Project Director Christina Bagatavicius — to deliver great work for a client that clearly understands design excellence.

Moreover, we have partnered with our colleagues at OCAD University to invent a unique and innovative design process, that I believe will lead to a bold and thoughtful new identity for the school.”

Students, faculty, staff and alumni of OCAD University can look forward to more details about the collaboration to be announced as the community settles into the 2010-2011 academic year.

Hunter Tura, President and CEO, Bruce Mau Design
Hunter Tura just recently joined BMD as President and CEO. In this role, he is responsible for the overall operation of the business, strengthening the way BMD serves its clients and expanding its new business efforts. Prior to joining BMD, Tura was Managing Director at 2x4, Inc., responsible for leading operational and strategic business efforts in the U.S. and China.

Before his time at 2x4, Inc., Tura was an architect at Rockwell Group/Studio Red and principal of his own architecture firm. He has worked in the office of AMO/Rem Koolhaas and has served on the design faculty of the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation and the Boston Architectural College. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Tura’s art and design work have been exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem. He is a Trustee of the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in New York City and has served as a member of the Exhibitions Committee of the Architectural League of New York.

Associate Creative Director Laura Stein, Bruce Mau Design
As a lead designer in the Toronto studio, Laura provides overall creative and strategic direction for a broad range of projects: brand and identity design, communication strategies, video and motion graphics, interactive design, book editorial and graphic design. Most recently, Laura has led her team through a multi-faceted long term project in support of Arizona State University. This work includes a communications framework, brand identity, launch strategy, and galvanizing video. Her most recent book project, The Third Teacher, an examination of the impact of our physical environment on education, has just been published by Abrams Books. Currently she is working on projects in television media that include a new network’s vision, programming, and communications.

Project Director Christina Bagatavicius, Bruce Mau Design
Christina is a management lead in the Toronto studio, providing strategic and business leadership across major projects and accounts. The projects she has led have ranged from visioning processes to exhibition design, brand identities, cultural research and communications strategies. Prior to joining Bruce Mau Design she worked at the Tate Britain in London, England as the Head of Interpretation, where she was responsible for developing the overall strategy around storytelling and the visitor experience. She is also a freelance arts writer for a range of cultural publications. Christina completed her Masters degree in History of Art at University College London, and earned a Bachelors degree in Philosophy at McGill University, Montreal.

About Bruce Mau Design
Bruce Mau Design (BMD; www.brucemaudesign.com) is an innovation and design studio centred on purpose and optimism. Since 1985, BMD has evolved from a graphic design studio to a leader in breakthrough design thinking, applying design methodologies to a wide range of business and cultural organizations with challenges in need of creative solutions. Creators of Massive Change®, the internationally acclaimed traveling exhibition, book, website, and interview series, BMD is an interdisciplinary studio made up of: artists, architects, graphic designers, filmmakers, brand strategists, biologists, publishers, curators and technologists. Some of the firm’s clients include: MTV, AGO, Coca-Cola, Arizona State University, MoMA and the feature length documentary The 11th Hour. BMD is a member of the MDC Partners network.

About OCAD University (OCADU)
OCAD University (www.ocad.ca) is Canada’s “University of the Imagination.” The University, founded in 1876, is dedicated to art and design education, practice and research and to knowledge and invention across a wide range of disciplines. OCAD University is building on its traditional, studio-based strengths, adding new approaches to learning that champion cross-disciplinary practice, collaboration and the integration of emerging technologies. In the Age of Imagination, OCAD University community members will be uniquely qualified to act as catalysts for the next advances in culture, technology and quality of life for all Canadians.

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For more information, contact:
 

Brown & Cohen Communications & Public Affairs
416-484-1132, Matt McNama, Ext. 4 and Kaitlynn Dodge, Ext. 5

OCAD University:
Steve Virtue, Director, Marketing & Communications, OCAD University
416-977-6000 Ext. 222

Sarah Mulholland, Media & Communications Officer
416.977.6000 Ext. 327 (mobile Ext. 1327)