Dr. Gerald McMaster

Dr. Gerald McMaster has over 30 years of international work and expertise in contemporary art, critical theory, museology and Indigenous aesthetics. His early interests concerned the lack of representation of Indigenous artists in art museums, and raising concern to how culturally sensitive objects were displayed and represented in ethnology museums. His experience as an artist and curator include conducting research, collecting art, and producing exhibitions.

Dr. Amish Morrell

Amish Morrell is an educator, curator, editor and writer. From 2008 to 2017 he was Editor and Director of Programs at C Magazine. At C Magazine he developed numerous public programs, including lectures and workshops held in partnership with organizations including The Toronto International Art Fair, The Power Plant, Mercer Union, Art Metropole and the Toronto Art Book Fair.

Gerald Mcmaster

Dr. McMaster has over 30 years international work and expertise in contemporary art, critical theory, museology and Indigenous aesthetics. His experience as an artist and curator in art and ethnology museums researching and collecting art, as well as producing exhibitions has given him a thorough understanding of transnational Indigenous visual culture and curatorial practice. His early interests concerned the ways in which culturally sensitive objects were displayed in ethnology museums, as well as the lack of representation of Indigenous artists in art museums.

Caroline Langill

Caroline Seck Langill is a Peterborough-based writer and curator whose academic scholarship and curatorial work looks at the intersections between art and science, as well as the related fields of new media art history, criticism and preservation. She is known for the way her writing considers machine aesthetics and scientific approaches to cultural production and histories. Her website Shifting Polarities, produced while researcher in residence at The Daniel Langlois Foundation, tracks the history of electronic media in Canada and includes interviews with pioneers of media art. With Dr.

Canadian Art Launch: Special Issue on Art Schools

Canadian Art
Tuesday, December 9, 2008 - 11:00pm to Wednesday, December 10, 2008 - 1:00am

Join Canadian Art as we launch our first-ever education issue, featuring stories on major art schools across the country.

Included are reports on Emily Carr University in Vancouver, UQAM and Concordia in Montreal, NSCAD in Halifax and OCAD in Toronto. Plus: Art departments across Canada, new programs in curatorial studies worldwide and 10 of this year’s top art grads.

This issue is chock-full of topical lessons on the state of art education in Canada.

From Vancouver, Deborah Campbell looks at the Emily Carr University’s widely respected painting department, while, from Montreal, former Tate curator Christina Bagatavicius reports on how art programs at UQAM and Concordia are shaping that city’s vibrant art scene.

Writer Gary Michael Dault examines the future of the newly renovated Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax and Winnipeg artist Paul Butler writes about his new residency at the Banff Centre that reimagines art training in terms of communal workshops.
In Toronto, Noah Richler discusses the impact of creative-economy theories on the Ontario College of Art and Design with president Sara Diamond and author Richard Florida, and University of Guelph fine art program director John Kissick offers his perspective on art departments at major Canadian universities, accompanied by a special artist project by Kristan Horton. For an international perspective, artist and writer Eldon Garnet reports from Italy on an international conference about new university programs in curatorial studies.

As a special addition to the issue, art columnist Leah Sandals surveys a cross-section of this year’s art school graduates on how their schools have influenced their art practices.

The winter 2008 issue of Canadian Art is on newsstands from December 15, 2008 to March 15, 2009.

Venue & Address: 
Elizabeth and Goulding Lambert Lounge (Rm 187) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free