Embodied Identity

Image: screen capture VR

Virtual Reality Project: Unreal Engine software

Embodied Identity is a virtual reality research-creation project that explores artistic interactions with digital modes of production, examining the interaction between spatial platforms that stimulate and challenge artists' perceptions and relationships to space, time, and materiality. 

Researchers Dr. Claire Brunet and Digital Futures Graduate Thoreau Bakker experiment with VR and 3D scanning technology to convey meaning inside a VR spatial context using digital sculptural referents. Sculpture/Installation undergrad Sam McGuire assisted with scan data post-processing through OCAD U Experiential Learning.

"Using body digitizing I aim to capture a person's inner strength and personality, to explore a sensory knowledge that brings life to the artwork inside a VR environment."

- Dr. Claire Brunet

Through an exploratory approach to VR the research team presents a repositioning of the ways artistic knowledge is transmitted. Most interestingly and importantly, in sculpture-installation art practice, artists' interactions with mediums and digital modes of production go beyond technical and technological characteristics to bring light to a sensory knowledge with limitless creative boundaries in view to open up to new intellectural territories and an artistic vision inspired by mutable spatial-temporal platforms.

Embodied Identity was featured as part of OCAD U's inaugural Gallery Crawl on May 10, 2018.

This project was also presented at VRTO 2018 by Dr. Claire Brunet, as a conference titled "3D Scanning to VR: Embodied Identity".
The Virtual & Augmented Reality World Conference and Expo is a unique, international exhibition, professional conference and solutions-focused symposium exploring arts, culture, society, humanities, ethics and sciences through immersive technologies.

Creator: 
Image from VR screen capture: white humanoid figures surround a kneeling individual
Photograph of audience attending Claire Brunet's presentation on her VR research.
Screen shot of Dr. Claire Brunet's profile on the VRTO website.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 3:45pm
Lab Member: 
Dr. Claire Brunet

Taste Graph: A narrative visualization tool for massive media data

Traditional newspapers are moving dramatically to digital publishing and data analytics in order to better understand their users’ behaviors, build their subscriber base, maintain their online readers, determine advertising placements. The goal is to deepen and diversify their revenue streams. For this purpose, VAL's Taste Graph research analyzes and synthesis the Globe and Mail data about their subscribers and their web-browsing habits, indicating connections between tastes.

Discovering affinities across different categories is a promising method of segmenting the audience within the context of media planning and potential advertising campaigns. For example, if someone shops for organic vegetables they might be more likely to shop to organic tea. Also, if data indicates close affinities between the categories of organic clothes and organic foods, it is reasonable that a purchaser of both organic vegetable and tea packs will be interested in shopping for an organic cotton shirt if they are provided with a choice to pick a shirt. As well, the people within the taste category  ‘organic’ could also be interested in certain types of drinks, types of shoes, and a sports travel lifestyle.

To establish similar taste correlations within Globe and Mail data, we follow a “narrative approach” that helps tell stories with the data by providing a smooth transition from raw data to communicating through data visualization. The tool we are developing supports the Globe and Mail marketing teams. Firstly, it provides an easy way to filter multiple sources of data and find relationships. Secondly, it shows patterns regarding Globe and Mail audience tastes in customized narrative visualizations. From these, the marketing teams could gain holistic knowledge about their audience tastes and see the impact of certain taste correlations or become aware of some hidden insights of interest regarding relationships between tastes. Thirdly, it allows Globe and Mail people to remain continuously knowledgeable about their business performance measures.

Our organization of the design space involves two types of narrative tactics: visual and structural. For visual tactics, we deploy several visual mechanisms that assist and facilitate the narrative. We chose a bubble chart, and grouped bar chart to illustrate, evaluate, and compare tastes, scores and engagement levels. Colour is then applied to different categories of advertisements to indicate degrees of divergence in tastes. We depend on navigation strategies as a structural tactic to assist the narrative. For example, we arrange the paths the viewer might take through the visualizations, and we make the visualizations interactive by including filtering, selecting, searching, and navigating of advertisement data. These strategies are tested and refined with Globe and Mail design and marketing teams and will then be audience tested.

Our visualization tool, in general, respects secure web application standards. Our goal is to provide the Globe and Mail with intuitive reports about the overall and manifold correlations of tastes of their readership and advertising audiences. Our proposed tool handles the complexity of massive and heterogeneous marketing data records and translates it into a communicative interface.

See a preview of TasteGraph from the IEEE Computer Society Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee VIS2018 here.

Click here to see Ahmad Karawash presenting this research at the Ontario OAR Conference, May 16 2018.
Click here to view this project on SOSCIP's page.

This research was presented by Dr. Ahmad Karawash, Postdoctoral Fellow and Team Lead, and Sana Shepko at the Ontario Centres of Excellence annual Discovery conference on May 1st, 2018 (see below).
 

Image of interactive tool, showing a graphical comparison of universe vs. specific category's engagement with taste groups
Photograph of Ahmad Karawash and Sana Shepko attending Discovery 2018 conference to present research.
Friday, May 18, 2018 - 10:45am
Lab Member: 
Ahmad Karawash
Marcus A. Gordon
Jad Rabbaa
Sana Shepko
Afrooz Samaei
Lan-Xi Dong
Dr. Greice C. Mariano
Hugh Ritchie
Ana Jofre
Stephen Keller
Dr. Steve Szigeti
Dr. Sara Diamond

QUIPUCAMAYOC

Quipucamayoc is an interactive art and technology project that merges a range of contemporary art forms – including 3D gaming, electroacoustical music, dance, experimental theatre, and wearable design – to construct a prototype communication network. This network is not based in text or language but is instead embodied, performative, and sensorial.

The network joins two Andean communities: one in Cusco, Peru, the former capital of the Incan empire, and another in Buenos Aires, Argentina, which has a large expatriate community of Peruvian Andean migrant workers. The network is activated through wearable technology inspired by quipucamayoc, the data keepers of the Incan court who recorded information about life in the empire using a complex string and knot notation system which they wore around their bodies. Body sensor arrays, which serve simultaneously as game controllers and musical instruments, are worn by movement artists to co-create live interactive generative narratives, imagery and music. The result is a public performance which reconnects two communities through interactive gameplay based in their common histories.

This project was inspired by the Huarochiri Manuscript, a 16th century written compilation of pre-colombian Andean religious rites, which offers a complex and fragmented narrative structure as well as rich visual and sound passages. Quipucamayoc was developed and presented by a collective of over 35 artists, historians, cultural theorists and technical experts in Peru, Argentina and Canada.

The audiovisual materials listed below are the result of a series of workshops held in Cusco and Buenos Aires between 2012 and 2016, and the final performance which was streamed live online in December 2016. The Quipucamayoc documentary can be viewed here.

Quipucamayoc also produced a series of 2D digital prints on canvas, adapted from 3D virtual environments. These prints were exhibited in a group show of the Faculty of Art Summer Institute from September 18 to 22nd, 2017 in the Ada Slaight Galleries at 100 McCaul. 

AUDIO AND VIDEO:
QUIPUCAMAYOC SOUNDCLOUD (audio)
QUIPUCAMAYOC WORKSHOP IN CUSCO (video)
QUIPUCAMAYOC WORKSHOP IN BUENOS AIRES (video)

ARTICLES OF INTEREST:
David McIntosh Receives SSHRC Funding for QUIPUCAMAYOC
Site-Specific Interview with David McIntosh

For more information please visit: http://quipucamayoc.com/

Quipucamayoc es una investigación de arte y tecnología que combina varios formatos artísticos contemporaneous – videojuego 3D, música electroacústica, danza, teatro experimental, diseño textil, sensores vestibles – con el objetivo de construir una red de comunicación que no es textual o linguística, sino corporal, performativa, sensorial. Esta red reune Cusco, Perú, y Buenos Aires, Argentina a través de artístas de movimiento usando trajes como controladores de juego e instrumentos musicales, por lo que los bailarines serán los cocreadores de música, de imágenes 3D y de una narrativa generativa/interactiva en vivo.
La inspiración de este proyecto es el manuscrito del Huarochirí, texto del siglo XVI que recopila ritos y mitología andina prehispánica, reconocido por su narrativa fragmentada, compleja, por sus pasajes riquísimos en imágenes visuales y sonoras. Quipucamayoc fue desarrollado y presentado por el colectivo de más de 35 artístas, teóricos y técnicos peruanos, argentinos y canadienses.
Los materiales audiovisuales presentados han sido producidos durante una serie de talleres en Cusco y Buenos Aires entre 2012 and 2016, y el performance final que fue transmitido en línea en vivo en Diciembre 2016.

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

SSHRC Logo

 

Creator: 
This is Research poster crop for Quipucamayoc, featuring project image (face)
Digital illustration of a distorted face
Photograph collage of dancers performing Quipucamayoc
Digital illustration, a screen grab from Quipucamayoc
Split screen photo of dancers performing while their in-game characters move
Digital image from Quipucamayoc - two figures dancing over clouds
Photograph of Quipucamayoc team in Cusco
Digital image from Quipucamayoc - Incan figures dancing
Friday, September 29, 2017 - 2:15pm
Lab Member: 
David Mcintosh
Judith Doyle
Emma Westecott

Nick Goso

Goso is a hybrid creative practitioner concentrating on meaningful communication through creative innovation, storytelling and design.

Luke Siemens

Luke Siemens is a Toronto-based Artist, working in drawing and digital medias. His work has shown nationally from Saskatoon, to Montreal and Toronto. Luke has been a sessional instructor at OCAD since 2013.

Geoffrey Shea

Geoffrey Shea is a Canadian media artist and researcher whose work highlights the intersections and opportunities between technological systems, belief systems and identity. His productions incorporate interactive programming, site-specific installation, mobile phones, a philosophical twist and a critical voice.

Doug Panton

Faculty Designation: Design

[Illustration & Graphic Design]

2013 - 2014 - Coordinator First Year Faculty of Design Student Success

- Associate Professor - Illustration Program

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2008 - 2013 - Chair First Year Faculty of Design

- Associate Professor Illustration Program

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Welcome: Digital Media Resident, Lillevan

Tuesday, October 28, 2008 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm

OCAD, with support from the Goethe-Institut Toronto welcomes Digital Media Resident Lillevan with a breakfast with faculty and students.

Venue & Address: 
Faculty & Student Lounge 205 Richmond St West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Graduate Workshop with Digital Media Resident Lillevan

Tuesday, October 28, 2008 - 5:30pm to 8:30pm

Digital Media Resident Lillevan presents a graduate workshop on advanced digital editing.

Venue & Address: 
Advanced Editing Suite (Level 2) 205 Richmond St West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Masters in Digital Media Information Session

Tuesday, September 30, 2008 - 4:00pm

Alison Robb from the Great Northern Way Campus (a consortium of UBC, SFU, Emily Carr, and BCIT) in Vancouver, BC will be here to inform our students of their Masters of Digital Media. This is the third year Alison has visited us. She says, "We would love to have more stars like . . . (OCAD Alumni) . . . come here."
Students, Alumni, Faculty are welcome!

Venue & Address: 
Room 284 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
tfairbairn@ocad.ca
Cost: 
Free

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