Eve Tuck and Robert Diaz - Where is Your Disruption?

Eve Tuck
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 7:00pm

CADN SPEAKER SERIES

Where is Your Disruption? 

Fragmentation and Entanglement in Contemporaneity

Divisiveness has been a prominent feature in the cultural and political discourse of the past year. Given such fragmentation, what are the possibilities for remedying social cohesiveness? What role can art play in addressing the disruptiveness that permeates contemporaneity? This speaker series explores the manifold ways that disorder and fragmentation pervade contemporary art, design and new media theory, practice and exhibition. Our speakers will discuss some of the emerging ideas of a history not yet written – the history of a contemporary art entangled with political issues, social trends and millennial concerns.

The MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories (CADN) at OCAD University invites the public to participate in two sets of conversations between artists, scholars and activists on the current state of art and politics. The first conversation occurs on March 7 and features artist Luis Jacob and philosopher Mark Kingwell.

 

Eve Tuck and Robert Diaz

Eve Tuck teaches at OISE and has conducted research on neoliberal educational policies, migrant youth, and Indigenous social and political thought. Her publications include Urban Youth and School Push-Out (2012), Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change (2014, co-edited with K. Wayne Yang), and the influential article "Decolonization Is Not a Metaphor" (2012). Tuck is Unangax and an enrolled member of the Aleut Community of St. Paul Island, Alaska.

Robert Diaz teaches transnational feminisms, globalization, and sexuality studies at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on Asian diasporic, postcolonial, and queer studies. His writings have recently appeared in Journal of Asian American Studies (2016) and Global Asian Popular Culture (2016). Diaz is currently co-editing Diasporic Intimacies: Queer Filipinos and Canadian Imaginaries.

 ___________________________

The MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories (CADN) at OCAD University invites the public to participate in two sets of conversations between artists, scholars and activists on the current state of art and politics. The second conversation occurs on March 22 and features Eve Tuck and Robert Diaz.

Seating for this event is limited. 

For more information, contact Jim Drobnick, CADN Program Director, jdrobnick@faculty.ocadu.ca

___________________________

The MA program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories prepares students to investigate the breadth and complexity of today's cultural landscape. Through historical contextualization, scholarly rigour, and cross-disciplinary methods, this program trains students to produce pioneering research into newly emerging art and design practices. CADN offers three fields of specialization: contemporary art history, design history, and new media art history. Working with an extensive core of over fifty faculty members, students are encouraged to generate their own insights into the ever-shifting world of contemporary art and culture.

Venue & Address: 
Room 190, 100 McCaul Street
Email: 
jdrobnick@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
CADN Speaker Series

Luis Jacob and Mark Kingwell - Where is Your Disruption?

Luis Jacob
Tuesday, March 7, 2017 - 7:00pm

CADN SPEAKER SERIES

Where is Your Disruption? 

Fragmentation and Entanglement in Contemporaneity

Divisiveness has been a prominent feature in the cultural and political discourse of the past year. Given such fragmentation, what are the possibilities for remedying social cohesiveness? What role can art play in addressing the disruptiveness that permeates contemporaneity? This speaker series explores the manifold ways that disorder and fragmentation pervade contemporary art, design and new media theory, practice and exhibition. Our speakers will discuss some of the emerging ideas of a history not yet written – the history of a contemporary art entangled with political issues, social trends and millennial concerns.

Luis Jacob and Mark Kingwell 

Luis Jacob is an artist who destabilizes conventions of viewing and compels a consideration of the socio-political context of art. Since being featured in Documenta 12, he has exhibited at La Biennale de Montréal, Witte de With, Taipei Biennial, Generali Foundation, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. He recently curated Form Follows Fiction: Art and Artists in Toronto (2016) at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto.

Mark Kingwell teaches in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He specializes in social and political theory, issues of ethics, justice and citizenship, and the philosophy of art, architecture and design. His recent books include Rites of Way: The Politics and Poetics of Public Space (co-edited with Patrick Tummel (2009), Unruly Voices (2012) and Measure Yourself Against the Earth (2015).

___________________________

The second set of conversations will feature scholars Eve Tuck (OISE) and Robert Diaz (University of Toronto), and occur on Wednesday, March 22. The event will be free to the public.

This speaker series is organized by students in the MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories at OCAD University, with special thanks to the Office of Graduate Studies for its generous support.

Seating for this event is limited. 

For more information, contact Jim Drobnick, CADN Program Director, jdrobnick@faculty.ocadu.ca

___________________________

The MA program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories prepares students to investigate the breadth and complexity of today's cultural landscape. Through historical contextualization, scholarly rigour, and cross-disciplinary methods, this program trains students to produce pioneering research into newly emerging art and design practices. CADN offers three fields of specialization: contemporary art history, design history, and new media art history. Working with an extensive core of over fifty faculty members, students are encouraged to generate their own insights into the ever-shifting world of contemporary art and culture.

Venue & Address: 
Room 190, 100 McCaul Street
Email: 
jdrobnick@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
CADN Speaker Series

Canadian Art Encounter: Janice Kerbel

Janice Kerbel head shot
Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 11:30pm

Forensics: Art Investigates Information

Disruption rules during this fall’s Canadian Art Encounters series, as three globally acclaimed artists talk about their groundbreaking work and our changing relationship with information.

Janice Kerbel is internationally renowned for her playful and inventive use of existing systems of information to create what she terms “strategies of deception.” Her work takes the form of elaborate instructions, theatrical and radio plays, detective stories, maps and scientific diagrams, all of which turn familiar narrative formats into new and fantastical realities. From producing an exhaustively researched manual for robbing a branch of a London Bank for Bank Job in 1999 to her “play for stage lights” as the sole means to present a dramatic narrative, Kerbel will have you wondering what is blank, what is missing and what needs to be filled in.

Kerbel was born in Toronto, and lives and works in London, UK, where she also teaches at Goldsmiths College. She has exhibited internationally, and is currently nominated for the 2015 Turner Prize.

Presented by BMO Financial Group

Supported by AIMIA Inspiring Loyalty

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 100 McCaul St. Auditorium, Room 190
Website: 
http://canadianart.ca/programs-and-events/2015/08/06/international-artists-series/
Cost: 
Tickets $20

Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition disrupts the personal brand

Untitled (Tennis Balls) by Claire Fontaine. Image courtesy Onsite [at] OCAD U.

“Today more than ever, artists and arts professionals are under pressure to build their personal reputations and capitalize on their social relationships. Networking, CV building and being seen at the right events around the globe with the right people, we must constantly promote the brand called You.” Helena Reckitt, curator

What was your most recent status update on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr? Did it reflect your personal brand as an artist? Were you trying to represent yourself? Do you feel pressure to create and maintain a certain identity online? If you’ve ever asked yourself what authorship and identity mean for an artist in the social media era, the Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition on Onsite [at] OCAD U may disrupt some of your assumptions (and/or amuse you).  

“In a prestigious field of contemporary art, where a steady stream of workers, interns and volunteers seems prepared to labour for low or even no wages, the notion that work is its own reward has led to dangerous levels of exploitation and self-exploitation.”

Stepping into the Getting Rid of Ourselves exhibition is like entering oppositeland. The exhibition rejects our contemporary expectations of artists, their work, markers of authenticity and shows no investment in what Helena Reckitt, the curator of the exhibition, calls the stock of “heroic artistic self-expression.” Instead, we see work that obscures, delegates, distributes or withdraws the conventional signs of authorship and artistic subjectivity.

The Paris-based collective artist Claire Fontaine presents “Untitled,” an installation of tennis balls with small slits or mouths that hold smuggled prisoner contraband (and yes, their placement on the gallery floor is designed to trip you and add an element of instability to the installation). 

Heath Bunting’s “Identity Bureau, Transferrable Synthetic British Natural Person” comprises library and travel cards to create legal evidence of a fabricated identity.

Janez Janša, Janez Janša and Janez Janša, who changed their names to that of the Slovenian Prime Minister, question the role of the artist’s name in building reputation and cultural capital in a video in which they show proof of their political, financial and legal identities.

Jesse Darling’s “Darling’s Room With Lyrics [Karaoke Vape Version RAW]” is a video adaptation of “Marvin’s Room” by R&B singer Drake that includes personal text messages as a forum for the performance of self. A live mic in the gallery encourages others to sing along.

Together, the installations by the 11 artists and artist collectives in Getting Rid of Ourselves explore how desires and subjectivities can be directed away from work:

“In order to recover life’s liberating vitality, they explore the need for us to stop treating our affective worlds and relationships as commodities. Only then can we halt work’s steady seepage into our every moment and relationship, and figure out what it really means to get a life.”

Getting Rid of Ourselves runs until October 11.

Quotes excerpted from Helena Reckitt’s essay, “Getting Rid of Ourselves.” Visit the gallery for a copy of the full text.

Find out more

Upcoming events as part of Getting Rid of Ourselves 

Helena Reckitt 

Onsite [at] OCAD U 

Getting Rid of Ourselves

Getting Rid of Ourselves
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - 4:00am to Saturday, October 11, 2014 - 4:00am

Curated by London, UK-based independent curator and critic Helena Reckitt

Artists: Becky Beasley, Adrian Blackwell, Heath Bunting, Jesse Darling, Kajsa Dahlberg, Claire Fontaine, Goldin+Senneby, Janez Janša, Janez Janša, Janez Janša [sic], Kernel.

Opening Talk:
Wednesday, July 16, 6:30 p.m.
Claire Fontaine presented in partnership with the Consulat général de France à Toronto
Room 190/Auditorium
100 McCaul Street, Toronto

Opening Reception:
Wednesday, July 16, 8 to 10 p.m.
Onsite [at] OCAD University
230 Richmond Street West

Getting Rid of Ourselves presents artists and artistic collaborations whose work variously obscures, delegates, withdraws or in other ways complicates the conventional signs of authorship and identity. By questioning investments in art as proof of self-expression — through tactics of anonymity, collective agency, shared authorship, appropriated identities, delegated curating and art making, and financial speculation — works in the exhibition highlight how subjectivity has been treated as a form of living currency to exploit, market and sell to.

More Events:
All begin at Onsite, 230 Richmond Street West

Curator's talk with Helena Reckitt
Saturday, July 19, 1 p.m.

Artists Survival Workshop led by irational.org
Sunday, July 20, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Let's Get Lost - A Reading Group on the Dismantling of Subjects and Spaces
Hosted by Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy

Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m. (August 5, August 19, September 2, September 16)

Insite Exhibition Tour with Paulette Phillips, OCAD U faculty, Integrated Media
September 24, 6:30 p.m.

Insite Exhibition Tour with Jim Drobnick, OCAD U faculty, Liberal Arts & Sciences
October 1, 6:30 p.m.

Biographies:

British artist Becky Beasley explores relationships between photography and objects, the body and interiority in a way that is highly subjective and yet developed through deep immersion in the thoughts and methods of other artists and writers. Literature is particularly generative for the artist, providing her own work with a place to start from and journey into. She graduated with an MFA from the Royal College of Art in 2002 and her recent solo exhibitions include The Walk... in greenat Laura Bartlett Gallery, London (2014); The Outside at Tate Britain (2012) and Francesca Minini Gallery, Milan (2011); and Setting at Laura Bartlett Gallery, London (2012).

Adrian Blackwell is an artist, designer and urban theorist whose work focuses on the relationship between urban spaces and political/economic forces. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard University and is a full-time faculty member at the University of Waterloo. Blackwell is also a founder and editor of the journal Scapegoat: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy.

Heath Bunting is a contemporary British artist based in Bristol, U.K. His work focuses on the development of open democratic communication systems and social structures on the Internet and in the public space. He came from the street up, passing through (and often revisiting) graffiti, performance, intervention, pirate radio, fax /mail art and BBS systems to become an active participant in the explosion of the Internet. He is co-founder of net.art and has created many accredited works. Bunting's work often explores the porosity of borders, both in physical space and online.

Swedish artist Kajsa Dahlberg has exhibited internationally and studied at the Whitney Independent Study Programme. Several of her projects focus on questions of anonymity and collective subjectivities. In Female Fist, 2006, a video about lesbian feminist porn makers, the filmmakers' voices, but not their faces, appear. For A Room of One's Own: A Thousand Diaries, 2006, Dahlberg created a palimpsest from copies of Virginia Wolf's 1929 book in the Swedish library system. By layering the pages on top of one another, Dahlberg almost submerges the printed text with readers' marginal comments and annotations.

London, U.K.-based Jesse Darling works between performance, installation and the Internet. She has made work for Tumblr and Facebook that explores the Internet as a space for self-fashioning, performance and viral proliferation. She has also performed and exhibited in galleries, including a solo show at London's Arcadia_Missa in 2012. She received her MFA from the Slade School of Art.

Claire Fontaine is a Paris-based collective artist, "founded" in 2004. After lifting her name from a popular brand of school notebooks, Claire Fontaine declared herself a "readymade artist." Her practice interrogates the political impotence and the crisis of singularity that seem to define contemporary art today. But if the artist herself is as displaced, deprived of its use value, and exchangeable as the products she makes, there is always the possibility of the "human strike." Claire Fontaine uses her freshness and youth to make herself a whatever-singularity and an existential terrorist in search of subjective emancipation. She grows up among the ruins of the notion of authorship, experimenting with collective protocols of production, détournements, and the production of various devices for the sharing of intellectual and private property. Recent selected solo exhibitions include Tears, The Jewish Museum, NY (2013); 1493, Espacio 1414, San Juan, Puerto Rico (2013); and Sell Your Debt, Queen's Nails, San Francisco (2013).

Goldin+Senneby is a framework for collaboration set up by Swedish artists Simon Goldin and Jakob Senneby. Since 2004 they have deployed forms of performative and delegated activity to examine legal, economic and spatial constructs. They have made projects for institutions including Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm; Kadist Foundation, Paris; and the Power Plant, Toronto. For their Headless project, Goldin+Senneby explore the notion of "offsite" in financial, aesthetic and political terms.

Janez Janša is a conceptual artist, performer and producer living in Ljubljana, Slovenia. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. He is the author of numerous videos, performances, installations and new media works which have been presented in several exhibitions, festivals and lectures around the world. He is the director of the film My Name Is Janez Janša, co-founder and director of Aksioma - Institute for Contemporary Art, Ljubljana and artistic director of the Aksioma | Project Space (aksioma.org.

Janez Janša is an conceptual artist, writer, performer and director of interdisciplinary performances. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. His socio-political work is focused on relationships between art, society and politics. He is author of the book Jan Fabre: La Discipline du chaos, le chaos de la discipline, Armand Colin, Paris 1994; and was editor in chief of Maska: The Performing Arts Journal, from 1999 to 2006. He is the director of Maska, Institute for Publishing, Production and Education based in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Janez Janša is a visual artist, working in the cross section of traditional visual art practices, conceptual art and new media. In 2007, together with Janez Janša and Janez Janša, he changed his name to that of the Slovenian right-wing Prime Minister. The three artists' collective work has strong social connotations and is characterized by an inter-media approach. In 2003 he represented Slovenia at 50th Venice Biennial. Selected exhibitions include the Sao Paolo Biennial, Prague Biennial and Limerick Biennial (zigakariz.com).

Kernel is an art collective founded in 2009 by architect Pegy Zali and artists Petros Moris and Theodoros Giannakis. They live and work between Athens and London. Their practice develops at the intersection of critical research, art, architecture and curating. Kernel has presented solo projects at SPACE, London 2013 and XYZ Outlet, Athens 2011. Selected group exhibitions include Afresh, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens; V22 Young London, V22, London; and the 3rd Athens Biennale - Monodrome, Diplareios School, Athens. They have organized curatorial projects such as Word of Mouth for the 3rd Athens Biennale, Athens; THE PUBLIC SCHOOL in Athens; BYOB London, The Woodmill, London; and Full/Operational/Toolbox, M21, Athens (kerneloperations.com).

Helena Reckitt is a critic and curator based in London, U.K. She was senior curator of Programmes at the Power Plant in Toronto from 2006 to 2010 and since 2011 has been senior lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London. Currently Reckitt is co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Curatorial Studies with Jennifer Fisher on Curating and the Affective Turn, and working with art historian Catherine Grant to develop the group exhibition O Sister, O Shadow.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite [at] OCAD U 230 Richmond St. W. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 Ext. 265