MARTK'D Sneaker Design Tournament

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - 3:00pm to 7:00pm

OCAD University is proud to collaborate with MARTK’D which celebrates art on sneakers.  The partnership was formed to execute a creative engagement initiative in the form of a sneaker design tournament.  The tournament will give 40 of Toronto’s up-and-coming high school artists from the Toronto District School Board and the Toronto Catholic District School Board the opportunity to showcase their creative skills through live competition in front of an audience. Artists will use VANS sneakers as a blank canvas and Sharpies to create their own designs, to be judged by audience members and special guests.

 

The format is as follows:

Two qualifying rounds will consist of 20 artists each, 40 artists in total.

The top four artists from each round, voted on by the crowd, will advance to the finals.

The eight finalists will compete to become named the ‘Sneaker Design Tournament’ champion!

The MARTK’D ‘Sneaker Design Tournament’ champion will receive an educational scholarship + merch.

 

WHAT: MARTK’D- Sneaker Design Tournament  

WHEN: Wednesday October 12th 2016, 11:00am – 3:00pm

WHERE:  OCAD University, Great Hall, 100 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, Great Hall, 100 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON
Email: 
admissions@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 ext. 4869
Cost: 
Free
40 Artists. 10 Schools. 3 Rounds. 20 Mins to Create. 1 Champion. Poster with event info and sponsors

LIFE DRAWING SESSION

OCAD U Alumni Association Logo
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm

Interested in drawing a professional model? These sessions are perfect for people looking for life drawing without instruction.

While this studio time is offered by the OCAD University Alumni Association, you don't have to be a student or alumnus to attend — the sessions are open to everyone!

Bring a drawing board and materials. $10 cash per session. Please pay the monitor on duty.

Please note that due to room capacity limits these sessions are run on a first-come first-served basis. There are no reserved spots.

Venue & Address: 
Room 615 100 McCaul Street Toronto On M5T 1W1
Website: 
https://www.ocadu.ca/alumni/alumni-association/life-drawing-sessions.htm?
Email: 
alumni@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
(416) 977-6000 ext. 4880
Cost: 
$10 Cash

Suspended (2018)

Photographic installation, 66“ h x 78” w x 5” d, collaged imagery, inkjet print on archival paper, mylar, corplast, clear cling, magnets

Collaged photographs and drawings that mine childhood memories, reflecting the volatility of nature, community and identity. 

With a Jewish father and an Anglo-Protestant mother, as a child, Lynne Heller, a multi- disciplinary artist, felt a sense of displacement in many settings. Raised in a distinctly gentile part of Toronto where her Jewish background set her apart, her experience of Jewish community was found at the summertime family retreat Camp Naivelt (Yiddish for “New World”). Located in Brampton, it was centred on secularist, progressive socialist values, activism, and a celebration of Jewish and Yiddish culture. At one time Naivelt was frequented by up to 5,000 people on any given weekend. While growing up, the artist experienced it as a place of sanctuary and freedom. 

The installation references a poignant childhood memory. Visiting Naivelt in the spring off-season, Heller’s family came upon enormous ice floes ejected from the Credit River that runs through the camp. Unpeopled and distant from the bustle and heat of summer, the site was made stranger still by this dramatic scene. Heller’s father lifted her onto one ice mass, which was taller than her seven-year-old stature, and she observed debris and fish frozen within. From that vantage point, she looked back to the one-lane bridge, the only passageway over the river and into the property. 

This eerie landscape and recollections frozen in time echo the dislocation of Heller’s upbringing. The massive ice blocks were both organic and oddly unnatural. Similarly, Heller felt both integrated into the Naivelt community during the 1960s and 70s yet often felt outside that milieu given her mixed heritage. And this haven of radical politics was in itself outside the norms of the Jewish mainstream. The ice-covered land evoked the gradual deterioration of the site that she witnessed alongside the dwindling of the community. Naivelt continues until today albeit with more modest participation. 

In the exhibition, the terrain of memory interweaves with the textures of College Street as perennial graffiti markings on our window enter the piece, linking the past with present-day realities where the artist’s self-conception is firmly grounded. An image of the Naivelt bridge appears, signaling possibilities in connecting two seemingly distinct realms, holding out the potential for crossing into the promise of a new world. 

Photograph of installation
Photographic detail of installation
Photographic detail of installation
Photographic detail of installation
Photograph of the installation as seen at night, across the street on College St.
Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 4:30pm
Lab Member: 
Lynne Heller

Veronika Szkudlarek, Teaching Intensive Stream, Lecturer

Veronika Szkudlarek is interested in the interdisciplinary and innovative possibilities of paint and digital imaging. She uses traditional analogue material like oil paints with animation software like Cinema 4D, After Effects, Dragonframe and Photoshop.  She looks to areas of growth, including technology and expanded practices for inspiration most recently using VR technology to make 3D paintings.  

Drawing as a weapon of mass creation

Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 11:00am

"El dibujo como arma de creacion masiva" translates to "Drawing as a weapon of mass creation" in english and will be presented by Coco Guzman at the University Miguel Hernandez, in the Fine Arts Department in Spain on June 12th.

Venue & Address: 
University Miguel Hernandez, Fine Arts Department, Altea (Spain)
Drawing poster

A Sketchbook Overview

Backyard Sketch by Sam Bertram
Classic Florals by Sam Bertram
Lazy Unicorn by Sam Bertram

So what do you include in your sketchbook if you aren't drawing from the infinite lists found online? Everything is the short answer. As an illustrator your interests need to expand past visual art, artists and designers. You need to be a collector of information and things. This means you must be interested in everything from politics to the environment, to pop culture, and even historical facts. Becoming a curator of information, will help you in creating those sketches. Be sure to be observing the world around you. Go to your local coffee shop, train station, or mall and draw. Draw the elderly man drinking a coffee, the tourists waiting for their 3 o'clock train, or the children running through the mall food court. All of these things show that you are observing and taking in the information surrounding you. It is this information which will allow you to convey the solutions to the problems proposed to you from potential clients. 

Don’t forget, as an illustrator you are essentially a problem solver, an image maker and a designer. Your goal is to help your prospective client navigate their current problem, while producing a clear solution, using the imagery you create as the key communication tool. Whether this is through traditional mediums, such as oil paintings, or digital mediums using Photoshop or Illustrator your imagery must start with a rough piece. This is one of the reasons a sketchbook is so important. You're work will evolve and change as you weed out the less relevant concepts for your final illustrations. This is where your sketchbook will be used as a form of process or idea book. Whether it be rough sketches, composition drawings, or colour roughs, your sketchbook is where all of these ideas should start to take form. Showing this process in your sketchbook, gives those viewing it a look into your creative process, which is what universities such as OCAD U are looking for.

Finally, remember to use your sketchbook to explore and have fun. Although your expected to be using your sketchbook for rough work and concepts, you should also be using your sketchbook as an outlet to explore new mediums, express silly ideas, and draw what you are interested in. A sketchbook can be an expression of yourself, where all ideas, good or bad begin. Don’t be afraid to use a strange new color palette on a silly doodle of a unicorn riding a dragon. Or to make a tape drawing out of the new colored tape you found in the crafts isle of the art store. Make sure you enjoy the time you spend in your sketchbook. Schools, like OCAD University are looking to the sketchbook to see your thought process, and your experimentation. They want to see someone who is constantly observing and consistently creating.

Use your sketchbook as a tool to create, to observe, to retain information, and to experiment with new techniques, tools, and to express yourself and your works. Using some of these will create an excellent example of your work and yourself as a creator.

Author: 
Samantha Bertram
Template: 
Standard Template

Marked

Rudolf Bikkers

Becoming an artist I consider not so much a career choice as the recognition of an inner compulsion: one is aware that creating art is and always will be an essential, vital part of oneself. Those artists who throughout history have defined a certain culture have traditionally learned their craft from experts as students or apprentices. Discussion and the exchange of ideas with their teachers and peers has helped shape their artistic views and philosophies.

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