Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo: Michel Thieme

Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 10:30pm

OCAD presents a series of talks called Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo, held in conjunction with the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams, on now at the OCAD Professional Gallery. Getting Under Your Skin examines the relationship of tattooing traditions to the contrasting values of community identity and inclusive culture.

Michel Thieme
Tuesday, April 29, 6:30 pm

Michel Thieme is founder and director of Michel Thieme Tribal Arts, a gallery for Oceanic and Indonesian art in Amsterdam, established in 2000. His interest in Polynesian art and in tattooing led him to be tattooed by Su'u Sulu’ape Paolo, the Samoan tattooing master whose work is at the heart of the exhibit Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams. In conversation with OCAD curator Charles Reeve, Mr. Thieme will reflect on this radical, deeply personal form of cultural cross-pollination.

Neil Ieremia
Presented in partnership with Premiere Dance Theatre/Harbourfront Centre
Saturday, May 3, 2008, 4 pm

Neil Ieremia is founder and Artistic Director for New Zealand’s leading contemporary all-male dance company, Black Grace, which has held a unique position on the world stage for over 10 years. Fusing Pacific Islander traditions and contemporary dance in an extraordinary and dynamic form, Black Grace has become internationally renowned for its artistry, creative excellence and innovation, while also becoming the world's leading exponent of Pacific contemporary dance. Sections of the company's repertoire explore, through movement, the ancient Samoan art of tatau.

Ieremia’s talk is held in conjunction with performances of Short Works by Black Grace at the Premiere Dance Theatre from April 30 to May 3, part of World Stage 2008 at Harbourfront Centre. For tickets and information, call Harbourfront Centre at 416-973-4000 or visit www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstage. Access to part of the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams on view at the theatre is available to ticket holders to the Premiere Dance Theatre at Harbourfront Centre.

Both talks take place at in OCAD’s Central Hall (Room 230), 100 McCaul Street, Toronto. All are welcome; admission is free. Limited seating available; guests are advised to arrive early. For information call 416-977-6000 or visit www.ocad.ca.

Tatau was organised by the Adam Art Gallery at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. OCAD would like to thank the following for their generous support: Urban Primitive Design Studio; The Hal Jackman Foundation; Toronto Arts Council; the Consulate General of The Netherlands; William Jamieson Tribal Art; and several anonymous donors.

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall (Rm 230) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
creeve@ocad.ca
Cost: 
Free

Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo: Neil Ieremia

Niel Ieremia
Saturday, May 3, 2008 - 8:00pm

OCAD presents the second event in a series of talks called Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo, held in conjunction with the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams, on now at the OCAD Professional Gallery. Getting Under Your Skin examines the relationship of tattooing traditions to the contrasting values of community identity and inclusive culture.

Neil Ieremia
Presented in partnership with Premiere Dance Theatre/Harbourfront Centre
Saturday, May 3, 2008, 4 pm

Neil Ieremia is founder and Artistic Director for New Zealand’s leading contemporary all-male dance company, Black Grace, which has held a unique position on the world stage for over 10 years. Fusing Pacific Islander traditions and contemporary dance in an extraordinary and dynamic form, Black Grace has become internationally renowned for its artistry, creative excellence and innovation, while also becoming the world's leading exponent of Pacific contemporary dance. Sections of the company's repertoire explore, through movement, the ancient Samoan art of tatau.

Ieremia’s talk is held in conjunction with performances of Short Works by Black Grace at the Premiere Dance Theatre from April 30 to May 3, part of World Stage 2008 at Harbourfront Centre. For tickets and information, call Harbourfront Centre at 416-973-4000 or visit www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstage. Access to part of the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams on view at the theatre is available to ticket holders to the Premiere Dance Theatre at Harbourfront Centre.

All are welcome; admission is free. Limited seating available; guests are advised to arrive early. For information call 416-977-6000 or visit www.ocad.ca.

Tatau was organised by the Adam Art Gallery at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. OCAD would like to thank the following for their generous support: Urban Primitive Design Studio; The Hal Jackman Foundation; Toronto Arts Council; the Consulate General of The Netherlands; William Jamieson Tribal Art; and several anonymous donors.

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall (Rm 230) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
creeve@ocad.ca
Cost: 
Free

Alexandre Arrechea - CORNERS

Portrait of Alexandre Arrechea
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 11:00pm to Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 12:30am

Join us at OCAD University to hear a talk by the renowned and thought-provoking speaker Alexandre Arrechea, a Cuban artist whose work involves concepts of power and its network of hierarchies, surveillance, control, prohibitions, and subjection. With his lecture Corners, Arrechea introduces sculpture within the context of the public environment. Dialogue strategies will be explored in the talk, as will issues such as the evolution of site-specific sculpture, the related realm of collaboration, and the future of public artwork.

Presented in association with the lecture is also an intimate student workshop on Thursday, September 29 at 3pm.

Lecture
Wednesday, September 28, 7pm
100 McCaul Street - Room 190 (Auditorium)

Small Student Workshop
Thursday, September 29, 3pm
100 McCaul Street – Room 258

About the Artist

Alexandre Arrechea (b. 1970, Trinidad, Cuba) lives and works in New York City. Arrechea received a BFA from Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA), Havana, Cuba in 1994. As a founding member (from 1991 through 2003) of the Cuban artist collective Los Carpinteros, his work employs visual metaphors for ongoing social themes of inequality, cultural disenfranchisement, and the disputed position of art in a global, media driven society.

Since returning to his individual practice, he focuses on large-scale sculptures and installations that interrogate the interconnectedness of urban design with systems of power and surveillance, first drafted in watercolors. His practice includes installation, painting, and the use of what he considers are objects with “elements of truth”; this last category has included found remnants of places, like debris, fragments of walls, and measuring tape. He is best known for monumental projects like NOLIMITS (2013), the ten sculptures on Park Avenue are riffs on iconic NYC buildings that twists and bends with the source of inspiration as though it were a malleable garden hose. Suffused  with humor and levity which reveal the powerful potential of artistic intervention to shock us out of our blasé of acceptance of everyday submission. In 2015, he won Artist of the Year Award by the Howard and Patricia Farber Foundation in Havana during the 12th Bienal de Havana. In 2016, Coachella Music Festival in Palm Springs, CA commissioned Arrechea and made Katrina Chair elevates the community around the Katrina Hurricane that in 2005 slammed the U.S. Gulf Coast with winds of up to 127 miles per hour. Arrechea has had individual exhibitions at institutions such as Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana; PS1 Contemporary Art Center in New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) in Los Angeles; and the New Museum in New York.

http://alexandrearrechea.com

Presented by Latin American Canadian Art Projects in partnership with OCAD University's President's Speaker Series
Photo by Rafael Garcia Sanchez.

 

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street - Auditorium - (Room 190)
Email: 
jnorthwayfrank@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x300
Cost: 
Free

Design for desirability: designing for others without losing yourself

Thursday, August 11, 2016 - 9:30pm

In this guest lecture Harvard's Dr. Beth Altringer shares some of her research and insights into what user centric design really means.

Designing for desirability can mean many things, but increasingly it means designing for what an end-user will find desirable. Her team has been researching how different professional designers decide what to do next on their projects. In this lecture, she will consider a variety of ways that designers get feedback during their design processes on what others will find desirable. Among other insights, it is clear that, despite the rise of user-centered design, many designers are still designing more for themselves than for others. The fundamental ongoing tension of 'designing for ourselves versus designing for others' continues through all stages of most design projects. It involves tradeoffs during problem framing, research methods, idea selection, iteration, implementation and evaluation. The extreme of designing for ourselves can increase the risk of confirmation bias and the extreme of designing for others may increase the risk of loss of designer motivation. How designers navigate this tension has implications for project and personal success, as well as the types and inclusivity of ideas that get created and prioritized.

Dr. Altringer runs the Desirability Lab at Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Science and the Graduate School of Design (SEAS/GSD). She uses behavioral and design research to help innovators in four ways: 1) studying what makes some designs more desirable; 2) studying decision-making related to the most (and least) successful projects; 3) applying research to develop more effective pre-professional project-based design courses; and 4) helping companies embed desirability into the experiences they create. Dr. Altringer has a background in design (Masters in architecture) and behavioral science (PhD studying multi-disciplinary design projects at companies like IDEO). She has worked with organizations like Kering/Gucci Group/Puma, Piaggio Fast Forward, Uber, Esquire, the US Navy and Diageo.

This event is sponsored by the Strategic Foresight & Innovation masters program at OCAD University. 

___

Resilience Design Lab (RDL) is one of OCAD University's Strategic Foresight & Innovation (SFI) Labs. It is focused on exploring, developing and implementing designs, methods and tools aimed at strengthening the resilience of organizations and communities.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD Univeristy Room MCA 230 - 100 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1W1
Website: 
http://www.eventbrite.com/e/designing-for-desirability-designing-for-others-without-losing-yourself-registration-26371726544?aff=poster
Cost: 
Free

International conceptual artist Ryan Gander inspires OCAD University community

Artist Ryan Gander speaking at lecture
Artist Ryan Gander seated with students
Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 5:00am

British conceptual artist Ryan Gander delivered an unconventional public talk at OCAD U on February 23. Bridging comedy and philosophy, the informal presentation titled LAX (Loose Associations X) was sprinkled with critiques of contemporary architecture, consumerist society and other seemingly unrelated topics.  

Gander is on campus for a week as part of OCAD U’s Nomadic Residents program working on a collaborative project with students that explores the idea of enforcing a methodology to create art. The resulting exhibition, Auto-Abstraction and Happenstance in Art Making, opens with a reception on Thursday, February 25, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Ada Slaight Gallery, Level 2, 100 McCaul St., Toronto.

Gander’s residency at OCAD U runs concurrently with a solo exhibition at Scrap Metal Gallery, Creative Play May Entail Some Risk Taking, through May 17.

Nomadic Residents is made possible by the generous support of the Jack Weinbaum Family Foundation. Other partners include the Impact Collective, Scrap Metal Gallery and the Musée d'art contemporain.

Gander is interviewed in CanadianArt.ca.

 

TALKxTALK Presents Lawrence Alverez

Image of a man wearing a protective mask
Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 4:00pm

Lawrence Alvarez is the co-founder of the Toronto Tool Library, a membership based service that give Torontonians access to hundreds of tools in locations across the city ranging from band saws to laser cutters. He is also the president of the Institute for a Resource-Based Economy, an organization founded on challenging people’s perceptions of ownership and our relationship to the Earth’s resources.

Through his experience with the Toronto Tool Library, a community tool sharing program, Lawrence will speak from experience on the logic of collaboration and access over ownership. With 3 locations opened in just over 2 years, and having completed over 20,000 successful tool loans, the tool library is an example of a project that maximizes the potential of the invested energy and resources within our single-use items, while releasing members from the burden of ownership.

On a planet with finite resources it makes sense to wisely use our irreplaceable ground-gifts while keeping the longevity of our collective human family in mind.

RSVP on the Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/501331443375082/

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul, room 656
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/events/501331443375082/
Cost: 
Free

Open for Collaboration: Open Access Week at OCAD U - Day 2

The Learning Zone, interior
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 1:45pm to 6:30pm

9:45am – 10:00am - Introduction to Guest Speakers by Chris Landry, Scholarly Communications Librarian

10:00am – 12:00pm - Guest Speakers:

e-artexte: A Case Study on Open Access and Visual Arts Publishing in Canada
• Corina MacDonald, Consultant & Information Specialist, Mat3rial // former Project Manager, Open Access Repository, Artexte

Green and Gold and Data All Over: Options for Navigating the Open Access Landscape
• Wayne Johnston, former Head of Research Enterprise & Scholarly Communication, University of Guelph

Predatory Open Access Journals: Myths & Realities
• John Dupuis, Science Librarian, Steacie Science & Engineering Library, York University

12:30pm – 2:30pm - Film Screening: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
Note: the screening will take place in the Graduate Gallery on 205 Richmond Street West, Ground floor

Venue & Address: 
The Learning Zone (Accessible through entrances at 113 McCaul Street and 122 St. Patrick Street) Note: the 12:30pm screening of The Internet's Own Boy will will take place in the Graduate Gallery at 205 Richmond Street W., ground floor RSVP: http://goo.gl/forms/1hi6cXgxOa Photo credit: Heather Evelyn
Website: 
http://ocad.libguides.com/scholcomm/oaweek
Email: 
Chris Landry Scholarly Communications Librarian clandry@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416 977 6000 x 224
Cost: 
Free

Bradley Quinn predicts the future of digital fashion

Photo of Bradley Quinn, UK fashion forecaster
Image of dress by Robert Tu of MeU featuring embedded LED lights
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 4:30pm

Fashion writer and design expert Bradley Quinn spoke to a packed auditorium of 300 OCAD U students, faculty, media and fashion aficionados on February 24, 2015. Thirty-year fashion journalist Jeanne Beker introduced Quinn and moderated the Q & A after his hour-long talk.

Quinn described advances in wearable technology since the first clunky attempts he saw at MIT in the mid-nineties. Most people just think of coloured LED lights sewn into clothes, he says, but, “Now the technology can engage with the wearer and interact in a different way where it can actually tell how the wearer feels. This is a huge shift.”

Advances in nanotechnology mean that microchips are increasingly robust and affordable. Inventions like programmable upholstery measure the consumer experience and send data to corporations for use in future designs. Three-D printing is another driver in wearable technology because of the ability to print conductive materials.

Quinn predicts a “radical shakeup” in the fashion industry five years from now. He says that the fashion graduate today is graduating with “a completely different skill set,” and can code, incorporate algorithms in their design process, and experiment with a wide range of technologies. “They are changing the fashion industry today,” Quinn told his audience, “more than the graduate of only six yrs ago.”

 

 

 

 

Architected Materials

Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Drew Trujillio "Dr. Woohoo" worked last year in the Applied Innovation group at Autodesk Research with a focus on robotics and functionally graded materials. Dr. Woohoo's background ranges from: film, broadcast, video games, websites, immersive experiences and design research. Central to his work is the need to find the balance between design and code, as well as people and the machines they use. Dr. Woohoo writes scripts, plug-ins or applications that work on the desktop or in the cloud to meet the need.

Venue & Address: 
Room 530 100 McCaul
Cost: 
Free

IDeA Competition - Guest Speaker

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - 7:00pm

Guest Speaker - Andrew Seo, IDeA Competition

IDeA Competition

A brief presentation about the IDeA Competition which is open to students of all undergraduate disciplines - and means to address a variety of barriers to 'accessibility' (e.g. physical, information/communications, organizational). Typically, students in design courses or those already working on projects are well-placed to submit.

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall, 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://2014idea.wordpress.com
Cost: 
Free

Pages