OCAD U’s INVC program hosts Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership meet-and-greet

Ryan Rice, Associate Dean, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School with participants. Photo by Martin Iskander.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 1:45pm

OCAD U’s Ryan Rice, Associate Dean, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, formerly Delaney Chair, along with The Inuit Art Quarterly/Inuit Art Foundation (IAF), hosted a meet-and-greet with partners of the Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership: The Pilimmaksarniq/Pijariuqsarniq Project.

The project is a partnered research training initiative (PRTI) that will support Inuit students studying to become academics and cultural leaders working to build capacity for Inuit to work in the arts.

INVC/OCAD U and IAF are the Toronto partners in the project. Two Master of Arts Indigenous students from OCAD University  ̶  Emma Steen and Adrienne Huard  ̶  have been hired as research assistants for the project.

Led by a group of Inuit advisers, this project seeks to address the longstanding absence of Inuit leadership across the humanities by establishing a culturally, socially and geographically relevant PRTI to provide meaningful opportunities for education and advancement. Pilimmaksarniq/ Pijariuqsarniq are the Inuit societal values of developing skills and knowledge through "observation, mentoring, practice, and effort."

The meet-and-greet included all of the partners working on the research project and upper administration, deans, chairs and Indigenous faculty.

Poster: 
Participants at INVC meet-and-greet. Photo by Martin Iskander.

The Laxgiik Convocation Robe: Luke Parnell & Selected Prints by Working Title Press

Friday, October 26, 2018 - 5:00pm to Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 5:00pm

The Laxgiik Convocation Robe: Luke Parnell & Selected Prints by Working Title Press

Curated by Erica Crisobal

The Laxgiik Convocation Robe is an installation created in the style of a Northwest coast Indigenous Chilkat blanket. This project is capturing the spirit in which these prestigious blankets are given: the spirit of reciprocity. Prints will be sold and removed from the installation one by one; the Robe will be ever changing until the last print is sold. 

Proceeds will be donated to Printmaking, Publications, Sculpture/Installation & Indigenous Visual Culture programs at OCAD U. 

Ada Slaight Gallery, OCAD University

100 McCaul Street, 2nd floor

Opening: 5:00-9:00pm Friday, October 26

Artist talk: 6:00pm Friday, October 26

Ongoing performance and sale: Friday, October 26 5pm-9pm; Saturday, October 27th, Noon-5pm

 

Venue & Address: 
Ada Slaight Gallery, OCAD University 100 McCaul St. 2nd Floor
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/2237564426479696/
Cost: 
FREE
Right: "The Laxgiik Convocation Robe" black text on white background. Left: orange, yellow and pink Northwest coast style image

Free public screening of Angry Inuk

Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 3:15pm to 5:45pm

Indigenous Visual Culture and Culture Shifts present a free public screening of:

 

Angry Inuk

October 4, 2018

3:15 – 5:45pm

Room 190 (Auditorium) OCAD University

100 McCaul St. Toronto ON.

 

A program will follow.

 

In her award-winning documentary, Inuk director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril offers a close look at the critical role of seal hunting in the lives of Inuit, and its importance to their sustainable economies in face of the aggressive and negative impact international campaigns and ban against the seal hunt has on their lives.

 

Angry Inuk (2016) 1 h 22 min

Director: Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, is a producer and award-winning director, whose films include Tunniit: Retracing the Lines of Inuit Tattoos (2010), Lumaaiuuq (2010) and The Embargo Project (2015).

 

OCAD’s Culture Shifts presents documentary media as a catalyst for critical discussions and community action for social change.

 

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/events/461746917656288/

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, 100 McCaul St., Room 190 (Auditorium)
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/461746917656288/
Poster for "Angry Inuk" film

TODAY: Barry Ace - Nigig Open Studio

Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm

Indigenous Visual Culture’s Nigig Visiting Artist Resident Barry Ace will open his studio to the public and present his new work “How can you expect me to reconcile when I know the truth?” made during the residency. His ‘work in progress’ will be exhibited this spring at Supermarket Art Fair 2018 in Stockholm, Sweden. Be among the first to see this important work!

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit OCAD University to focus on a short-term project and explore in a collaborative environment, issues impacting their work.

For Information, please contact: vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca

 

About the artist

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist and currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

Image: Courtesy of the artist.

The Nigig Artist In Residence Program is supported through the Ministry of Advance Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, Room 718, 7th Floor, 205 Richmond St.
Image: Courtesy of the artist.

Meet Anishinaabe artist Katheryn Wabegijig

My name is Katheryn Wabegijig. I am a 37 year old Ojibway/Odawa multi-disciplinary artist, custom picture framer and emerging writer who grew up in the small mining town of Elliot Lake, Ontario with ancestry in Wikwemikong, Atikameksheng Anishnawbek and belonging to Garden River First Nation/Ketegaunseebee. I graduated from Cambrian College’s 4 year Fine Arts program in 2003 and in 2016 with a BFA from OCAD University majoring in Drawing and Painting and minoring in Indigenous Visual Culture where I furthered my cultural education and continued on my path towards Decolonization through cathartic personal explorations.

It is not difficult to see why OCAD University is the leading academic institution of choice for Indigenous students pursuing Art and Design post-secondary education and I would like to share with you some of my experiences here at OCAD and in the INVC program. I believe that Indigenous students in communities across Turtle Island have a great opportunity to excel as artists and designers through the various programs that are offered here and the amount of support offered to students. I also believe that it is vital to go directly to those communities, engage those wishing to further their arts education and inspire their choice to be OCAD University.

I, myself, entered OCAD University as a second year transfer student and mature student after 10 years of focusing on my custom picture framing career. I graduated from Cambrian College where I took their 4 year Fine Arts program in 2003 but always had the dream of attending OCAD. I had to make a choice between my career and furthering my education and so, I told myself, “If I get accepted into OCAD University this time, I’m going!” The professors, staff and fellow artists here made my experience at OCAD University the very best decision of my life and I wish I had had the courage to take the step earlier. It was the best decision that I have ever made for myself as an artist and as an individual. I took Drawing and Painting as my major. I felt that I absolutely needed to take the Indigenous Visual Culture program because it was vital to my learning as an Anishinaabe artist who is continually searching for my place in each of the communities that I have grown up within.

Not only did I achieve my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with an INVC minor but I had the opportunity to witness and learn from amazing Indigenous artists and staff at INVC who profoundly changed and supported my art practice. OCAD U and INVC made it possible for me to delve into my art by working through personal and cultural issues in a safe and supportive environment. In fact, my artwork that was featured in the culminating Grad Ex show for the graduating class was purchased by the Royal Ontario Museum! So, the opportunities here at OCAD University are truly countless, with exhibition opportunities that are attended by some of the most influential people in the art industry.

Also, students will find that throughout their time here that they will continually be surrounded by those influential presences. To be able to hear Janet Rogers recite and perform her powerful pieces of writing, to share in the knowledge of respected Elders and artists like Duke Redbird, to go on a tour of the ROM led by Bonnie Devine (the founding Chair of INVC) speaking on her masterpieces or to be lucky enough to be taught by her or Ryan Rice, an amazing Curator and the Chair of INVC, is undoubtedly an honour and only to be experienced here at Canada’s oldest and largest art, design and new media university.

The INVC Student Centre creates many community building events and activities including Buffalo Stew lunches held every Wednesday, Bead and Read which brings together readings from amazing authors while learning new beading techniques. The Mighty Pen, a writing group held for Indigenous students and students of colour began in my final year at OCAD U. I had the privilege of being involved with the very first group. What stemmed from that was a reconnection to my love for writing that led to my first published piece this year. My mentor from that group was and still is an amazing support. These groups, staff and spaces offer a welcoming gathering place to share experience, grow as artists and make friends that will last well beyond your OCAD University experience! Organized trips that I was able to attend were The McMichael Gallery and the Petroglyphs in Peterborough, which had an incredible impact on my art practice. That list is ever expanding, connecting students in this amazing program to culturally significant and life-altering experiences in Toronto and surrounding areas.

The way that I was able to delve into my art by working through personal and cultural issues in a safe and supportive environment allowed me to come to many realizations and revelations that carry with me in my professional career as an artist and now as the Indigenous Student Recruiter.

katherynwabegijig.format.com/

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Stories from the Vault: 7th Annual Indigenous Visual Culture Symposium

Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 2:00pm

Stories from the Vault: 7th Annual Indigenous Visual Culture Symposium
Sunday, September 17
2 to 5:30 p.m.

Free
Light refreshments available

Panelists: Barry Ace, David General, Rick Hill, Tom Hill, Barry Pottle, Ryan Rice
Moderated by: Linda Grussani
Welcome by: Elder Garry Sault, Mississaugas of New Credit

In conjunction with the exhibition, raise a flag: work from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015), Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University and Onsite Gallery co-present the symposium, Stories From The Vault. The symposium will include a panel of former managers and curators of the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s National Indigenous Art Collection who will speak of their experience in developing the collection, identify and speak of their favorite works and share unique stories to shed light on the national collection’s 50 year history.

Image: views of the Indigenous Art Centre's vault.
 

raise a flag is produced with the support of the Collection of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, courtesy of the Indigenous Art Centre/Collection des Affaires autochtones et du Nord Canada, courtoisie du Centre d'art autochtone; Our Children's Medicine program and HigherMe; the Canada Council for the Arts; the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council; the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD University; and, the Delaney Family Foundation.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W. (Ground Floor)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Views of the Indigenous Art Centre's vault

INVC's Nigig Artist In Residence Open Studio / Closing Reception

Neebinnnaukzhik Southall showcases her work.
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm

You Are Invited
Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Open Studio
Neebinnnaukzhik Southall

Neebin will share the project she has developed during the NIGIG Artist Residency. The project focuses on the creation of Anishinaabe stock art and icons, which promotes visual sovereignty by exploring Anishinaabe visuals and material culture such as petroglyphs, floral beadwork, and Birch bark pictographs.

Neebinnaukzhik Southall, a member of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, is a graphic designer, photographer, artist, and writer. 

Open Studio / Closing Reception
Thursday March 16
113 McCaul (OCAD U Annex)
Room 1401, 4th Floor
5pm-7pm

For more information contact: mbedard@ocadu.ca

Venue & Address: 
113 McCaul (OCAD U Annex)
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/264570610651912/?notif_t=plan_user_joined&notif_id=1489022397139601
Email: 
mbedard@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

Bonnie Devine

Bonnie Devine is an Associate Professor at OCAD University and the Founding Chair of OCAD U's Indigenous Visual Culture Program. She is an installation artist, curator, writer, and educator, and a member of the Serpent River First Nation of Northern Ontario (Anishinaabe/Ojibwa). Professor Devine has taught studio and liberal arts courses at York University, Queen's University, and the Centre for Indigenous Theatre. She has been a full-time instructor at OCAD University in the Faculty of Art, the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies since 2008.

Colonization Road

Peek inside Kaia'tanoron Bush's sketchbook

Photo of Kaia'tanoron
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Getting a peek inside an artist’s sketchbook is a pretty cool experience. Sketchbooks show an artist’s creative process and what they’re thinking about.

We were lucky that third year Indigenous Visual Culture student Kaia’tanoron Bush showed us a few pages of her book. “It’s a pretty unique program here”, says Kaiatanoron about INVC. “What really excited me was the opportunity to learn from someone from my community.”

 

This is from a series of paintings that were never finished. Kaia’tanoron took a series of photos of dead birds on the street and painted them. “I like the fragility,” she says. “And, it’s something people don’t want to look at but it’s there.”

 

This process work, featuring rhinestones and nail polish, was for a performance class. The performance was called “Pick Me” looking at the poses people take when picking scabs. The performance was about dealing with self-harm and collage as an alternative.

 

Kaia’tanoron calls this series of sketches Angry Hands. “I have anxiety and I have to draw to get out the negative energy,” she says. Plus, practicing drawing hands requires focus and can take extra practice to master.“Hands are very expressive. They can look angry or gentle,” says Kaia’tanoron. “They mean a lot.”

This is a poster design to raise awareness about missing and murdered Indigenous women.

 

“When I was born my uncle called me an apple – red on the outside and white on the inside,” says Kaia’tanoron. Part of her time here at OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture program has been about digesting her status as mixed-race. “This page is a meditation on being an apple,” she says.

 

 

 

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