Statement from President Diamond on Colten Boushie

Monday, February 12, 2018

On behalf of OCAD University, I offer deep condolences to the Baptiste/Boushie family and the people of Red Pheasant Reserve, and mourn the loss of a young man described by his mother as gentle and optimistic. We agree with Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould when she says “Canada must do better.” It is essential for the judicial system to ensure a fair, just and equitable legal process for all Indigenous people of all ages.  

At this time, our hearts also go out to our Indigenous students, faculty and staff who are deeply affected by Friday’s verdict and its implications.

OCAD University recognizes the urgency for us all, as allies and an institution, to undertake meaningful actions of social justice through art and design education. 

OCAD University acknowledges the ancestral and traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the New Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinaabe and the Huron-Wendat, who are the original owners and custodians of the land on which we stand.

Nigig Visiting Artist Talk: Barry Ace

Photo of artist Barry Ace in front of his works
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

Please contact Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher, vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca, if you plan on attending. 

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

 

 

Venue & Address: 
INVC Student Centre 113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange) Level 4, Room 410
Email: 
vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

Documentary screening: WHEN THEY AWAKE

Film poster depicting a number of Indigenous artists
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 6:45pm to 9:00pm

Following in the footsteps of trailblazers like Buffy Sainte-Marie and Robbie Robertson, Indigenous musicians across North America are carving paths into mainstream consciousness, reclaiming their rightful place in contemporary culture, and using music as a gateway for dialogue and reconciliation. 

With intimate access to all the key players, from Tanya Tagaq to A Tribe Called Red and everyone in between, WHEN THEY AWAKE is a music revolution right before your eyes.

About the Director (in attendance for Q & A): 
PJ MARCELLINO is a Toronto-based producer/director with Longyearbyen Media. He was previously a photo-reporter, journalist, author, and editor, and later a political advisor with international agencies, before reinventing himself as a filmmaker, bringing onto the screen a sense of urgency and empathy developed through working on hard-hitting socio-political issues such as migration, human security, and peace-building. He studied Documentary Filmmaking at Toronto's Documentary Film Institute at Seneca College.

In partnership with Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U, CULTURE SHIFTS is a documentary series at OCAD that presents documentary media as a catalyst for critical discussions and community action for social change. The series his supported by Art and Social Change, the Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture, the Faculty of Art and the Integrated Media Program.

For information contact Ryan Rice rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 100 McCaul St., Toronto Level 2, Room 230
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/280362762488775
Email: 
rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

The Mural of the Story – Mini-Symposium

Three panels of murals
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Indigenous creative expression is gaining momentum by occupying space as murals on Toronto’s concrete walls. The city as “project space” extends beyond graffiti, postering, flag-raising and site-specific public artwork to address an Indigenous presence located across the GTA. Recent murals speak to land acknowledgement, history and honoring as means to recognize Indigenous tradition, knowledge and beauty.

The Mural of the Story brings together a panel of artists including Tannis Nielson, Philip Cote, Tia Cavanagh and Jason Baerg, who will introduce and discuss their recent mural projects and how they activate community and insert Indigeneity within the urban landscape.

The mini-symposium is supported by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program in conjunction with the winter course Language and the Land.

Panelists Bios:

Jason Baerg is an Indigenous curator, educator, and visual artist who graduated from Concordia University with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and a Masters of Fine Arts from Rutgers University. He currently is teaching as the Assistant Professor in Indigenous Practices in Contemporary Painting and Media Art at OCAD University. For more information about his work, please visit Jasonbaerg.com.

Tia Cavanagh, originally from the northern shores of Lake Huron in Ontario, has also lived and studied in Havelock, Norwood, Peterborough, Montreal and Toronto. Achieving her BFA at OCAD university she now studies at Trent University working on her Masters degree in Indigenous methodologies applied to art making.

Tannis Nielsen is a Métis Woman (of Saulteaux/Anishnawbe and Danish descent,) with twenty years of professional experience in the arts, cultural and community sectors, and ten years teaching practice at the post-secondary level. Tannis holds a Masters in Visual Studies Degree (M.V.S.) from the University of Toronto, an Art and Art History-Specialist Degree from U of T, as well as a Diploma in Art and Art History from Sheridan College, in Oakville, Ontario.

Philip Cote is an artist, an educator, and a Sweat Ceremony leader. A graduate of OCAD University’s Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design in 2015, Philip creates opportunities for teaching methodologies on Indigenous symbolism, language, knowledge, and history. His teaching philosophy comes from his personal experience of Active Participation and experiential learning through his work as Indigenous knowledge and wisdom keeper, and observations through land-based pedagogy.

For information – rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca

Images courtesy of the artists
 

 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Room 230, 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/165258367576102/
Email: 
rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

NOW Magazine calls raise a flag one of 2017’s 10 best art shows

Woman looking at a photo of a woman lying down with fringes on her back
Wednesday, December 6, 2017

The inaugural exhibition in Onsite Gallery’s luminous new space at 199 Richmond St. W. has been declared one of Toronto’s top ten exhibitions this year:

“Raise A Flag: Works From The Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015), Onsite Gallery at OCADU (September 16-December 10) In the refurbished gallery, OCADU Indigenous visual culture chair Ryan Rice brought together selections from the federal government’s Indigenous art collection, a 50-year-old program at Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development that hires First Nations curators to acquire artworks that are rarely exhibited. The show highlighted the ongoing cultural strategies Indigenous artists have used in a variety of media to insert their stories into the colonial narrative and keep their creative spirits alive.”

– Fran Schechter, NOW Magazine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual artist Barry Ace joins OCAD University for Nigig residency

Portrait of artist Barry Ace
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U welcomes Barry Ace as the winter 2018 Nigig Visiting Artist-in-Residence. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency supports the dynamism of Indigenous contemporary art and design practices and is a tremendous educational opportunity for the artist and students.

Faculty interested in scheduling a classroom visit with Barry Ace may email the Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher – vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca after January 3, 2018.

The public is invited to the Artist’s talk at the Welcome Buffalo Stew Luncheon:

Wednesday, January 10, 2018    
INVC Student Centre 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.
113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange), Level 4, Room 410

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

About the Artist:

As a practicing visual artist, Barry Ace’s work has been included in numerous group and solo exhibitions, including: Emergence from the Shadows – First Peoples Photographic Perspectives, Canadian Museum of Civilization (1996: Ottawa); Urban Myths: Aboriginal Artists in the City. Karsh-Masson Gallery (2000: Ottawa); The Dress Show, Leonard and Ellen Bina Art Gallery (2003: Montréal); Super Phat Nish, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba (2006: Brandon); Playing Tricks, American Indian Community House Gallery (2006: New York); m∂ntu’c – little spirits, little powers”, Nordamerika Native Museum (2010: Zurich); Changing Hands 3 – Art Without Reservations, Museum of Art and Design (2012-2014: New York); Mnemonic Manifestations, Latcham Gallery, (2015: Stouffville); Native Fashion Now: North American Native Style (2016 – 2017: Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts and various US venues), Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood, Art Gallery of Toronto (2017: Toronto); Anishinaabeg: Art & Power, Royal Ontario Museum (2017: Toronto); Insurgence / Resurgence, Winnipeg Art Gallery (2017: Winnipeg); raise a flag: Works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015) (2017 Toronto), 2017 Canadian Biennial, National Gallery of Canada (2017: Ottawa).

His work can be found in numerous public and private collections in Canada and abroad, including the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (Ottawa); Woodland Cultural Centre (Brantford); Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto); Ottawa Art Gallery (Ottawa); The Canada Council Art Bank, (Ottawa); Nordamerika Native Museum (Zurich, Switzerland); City of Ottawa (Ottawa); Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Gatineau); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); Global Affairs Canada (Ottawa).

He is the recipient of the KM Hunter Visual Artist Award for 2015.

 

 

 

Poster: 
Three beaded cloth and screen installations hanging in a gallery wall

OCAD U and AGO present The Entangled Gaze conference

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 6:00pm to Friday, October 20, 2017 - 7:00pm

Entangled Gaze convenes an interdisciplinary group of scholars, museum professionals, artists, and Indigenous community members from North America and Europe, to explore post-contact histories as they have been expressed through Indigenous art and visual culture.

Presenters include:

Kent Monkman, Barry Ace, Rosalie Favel, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie, Embassy of Imagination, Lisa Myers; scholars Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Rainer Hatoum, Kaitlin McCormick, Jonathan King, Nicole Perry, Monika Siebert, Christopher Green, Anna Brus, Markus Lindner, Rick Hill; and curators Wanda Nanibush, Nika Collison Jisgang, Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Nii Q. Quarcoopome, and Candace Greene.

The opening reception at Provo Food Bar features storyteller Drew Hayden Taylor, who uses humour to address the profound and entangled relationships between Indigenous and Euro-Canadians.

Tickets may be purchased online.
Public: $75
Students: $45

 

Below:

Left image: Sea Captain Figure, c. 1840. Haida, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. Argillite, ivory, 46.8 x 13.5 x 8 cm. Purchased with Funds from the Estate of Mary Eileen Ash, 2008. Image © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2008/43

Right image: Paul Kane. Death of Omoxesisisany or Big Snake, 1858 c – 1859. Embossed chromo lithograph on paper, 17.2 x 46.1 cm. Gift of Robert Hunter, 2006. © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario 2006/29

Venue & Address: 
AGO and OCAD University, see schedule: http://www.entangledgaze.ca/schedule/
Website: 
http://www.entangledgaze.ca
Email: 
Peter Scott pscott@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Tickets may be purchased online Public: $75 Students: $45 https://ago.ca/events/entangled-gaze-indigenous-and-european-views-each-other
Poster for event, features painting of an Indigenous persons on horseback, and a sculpture of a European captain

Meet Anishinaabe artist Katheryn Wabegijig

My name is Katheryn Wabegijig. I am a 37 year old Ojibway/Odawa multi-disciplinary artist, custom picture framer and emerging writer who grew up in the small mining town of Elliot Lake, Ontario with ancestry in Wikwemikong, Atikameksheng Anishnawbek and belonging to Garden River First Nation/Ketegaunseebee. I graduated from Cambrian College’s 4 year Fine Arts program in 2003 and in 2016 with a BFA from OCAD University majoring in Drawing and Painting and minoring in Indigenous Visual Culture where I furthered my cultural education and continued on my path towards Decolonization through cathartic personal explorations.

It is not difficult to see why OCAD University is the leading academic institution of choice for Indigenous students pursuing Art and Design post-secondary education and I would like to share with you some of my experiences here at OCAD and in the INVC program. I believe that Indigenous students in communities across Turtle Island have a great opportunity to excel as artists and designers through the various programs that are offered here and the amount of support offered to students. I also believe that it is vital to go directly to those communities, engage those wishing to further their arts education and inspire their choice to be OCAD University.

I, myself, entered OCAD University as a second year transfer student and mature student after 10 years of focusing on my custom picture framing career. I graduated from Cambrian College where I took their 4 year Fine Arts program in 2003 but always had the dream of attending OCAD. I had to make a choice between my career and furthering my education and so, I told myself, “If I get accepted into OCAD University this time, I’m going!” The professors, staff and fellow artists here made my experience at OCAD University the very best decision of my life and I wish I had had the courage to take the step earlier. It was the best decision that I have ever made for myself as an artist and as an individual. I took Drawing and Painting as my major. I felt that I absolutely needed to take the Indigenous Visual Culture program because it was vital to my learning as an Anishinaabe artist who is continually searching for my place in each of the communities that I have grown up within.

Not only did I achieve my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with an INVC minor but I had the opportunity to witness and learn from amazing Indigenous artists and staff at INVC who profoundly changed and supported my art practice. OCAD U and INVC made it possible for me to delve into my art by working through personal and cultural issues in a safe and supportive environment. In fact, my artwork that was featured in the culminating Grad Ex show for the graduating class was purchased by the Royal Ontario Museum! So, the opportunities here at OCAD University are truly countless, with exhibition opportunities that are attended by some of the most influential people in the art industry.

Also, students will find that throughout their time here that they will continually be surrounded by those influential presences. To be able to hear Janet Rogers recite and perform her powerful pieces of writing, to share in the knowledge of respected Elders and artists like Duke Redbird, to go on a tour of the ROM led by Bonnie Devine (the founding Chair of INVC) speaking on her masterpieces or to be lucky enough to be taught by her or Ryan Rice, an amazing Curator and the Chair of INVC, is undoubtedly an honour and only to be experienced here at Canada’s oldest and largest art, design and new media university.

The INVC Student Centre creates many community building events and activities including Buffalo Stew lunches held every Wednesday, Bead and Read which brings together readings from amazing authors while learning new beading techniques. The Mighty Pen, a writing group held for Indigenous students and students of colour began in my final year at OCAD U. I had the privilege of being involved with the very first group. What stemmed from that was a reconnection to my love for writing that led to my first published piece this year. My mentor from that group was and still is an amazing support. These groups, staff and spaces offer a welcoming gathering place to share experience, grow as artists and make friends that will last well beyond your OCAD University experience! Organized trips that I was able to attend were The McMichael Gallery and the Petroglyphs in Peterborough, which had an incredible impact on my art practice. That list is ever expanding, connecting students in this amazing program to culturally significant and life-altering experiences in Toronto and surrounding areas.

The way that I was able to delve into my art by working through personal and cultural issues in a safe and supportive environment allowed me to come to many realizations and revelations that carry with me in my professional career as an artist and as Collections Manager at Canadian Arctic Producers.

katherynwabegijig.format.com/

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Indigenous Visual Culture’s Nigig Visiting Artist: Joi T. Arcand

Artwork made with neon signage
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Indigenous Visual Culture with the Faculty of Design at OCAD U welcomes Joi T. Arcand as our Fall 2017 Nigig Visiting Artist in ResidenceOctober 15 – November 11, 2017

Joi T. Arcand is a photo-based artist and a member of the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation currently based in Ottawa. Arcand's work has recently been exhibited at the Contemporary Native Art Biennial – Art Mur (Montreal), Kenderdine Art Gallery (Saskatoon), aka artist-run (Saskatoon), Access Gallery (Vancouver) and internationally in the United States, London UK, and Bilbao, Spain. She curated the exhibition Language of Puncture  at Gallery 101 (Ottawa) that runs until October 28.

Arcand received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2005. In 2006, along with Felicia Gay, she co-founded the Red Shift Gallery, a contemporary Indigenous art gallery in Saskatoon. In 2012, she founded kimiwan 'zine, a quarterly Indigenous arts publication.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD University, is a program that provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit OCAD University for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore in a collaborative environment, issues impacting their work. The visiting artist will engage and interact with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop and/or demonstration.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency supports the dynamism located in Indigenous contemporary art and design practices and is a tremendous educational opportunity for the artist and students.

Faculty interested in scheduling a classroom visit with Joi may email the Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher – vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca after October 2.

Public NIGIG Hosted Events

Wednesday, October 18             
Welcome/Buffalo Stew Luncheon/Artist Talk

Other events will be announced.

 

Image: Joi Arcand, (ēkāwiya nēpēwisi), 2017. Neon channel sign (pink). 120.7 x 182.9 cm.  Morning Star exhibition, The Jackman Humanities Institute, 170 St George Street, 10th Floor

Gerald McMaster heading to 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale

Dr. Gerald McMaster, photo by Sebastian Kriete
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

OCAD U’s Gerald McMaster, together with an Indigenous design team, is representing Canada at 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. The Canada Council for the Arts announced that the Indigenous project UNCEDED has been selected through a national juried competition to represent Canada at the Architecture Biennale. 

Led by internationally-renowned architect Douglas Cardinal, the team includes Anishnaabe Elders and Indigenous co-curators, Dr. Gerald McMaster, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture and Curatorial Practice at OCAD University, and Dr. David Fortin, incoming director of the McEwen School of Architecture at Laurentian University. Joining them is a decorated group of Indigenous architects from across North America.

“Having represented Canada as curator to the 1995 Venice Biennale of Visual Arts, and to be asked to be lead curator by such a distinguished group of Indigenous architects is both an honour and privilege," says Dr. McMaster. 

UNCEDED will emphasize and celebrate the work of Indigenous architects and designers throughout Turtle Island. It is grounded in the legacy of the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Report.

Dr. McMaster has more than 30 years of international work and expertise in contemporary art, critical theory, museology and Indigenous aesthetics. Throughout his career, his championing of the mainstream value of Indigenous art, among other things, has led to his being chosen to represent Canada at a number of prestigious international events.

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