TERRA INCOGNITA: submission call

Thursday, February 16, 2017 to Friday, March 31, 2017

Terra Incognita can be defined as "an unknown territory, an unexplored country or field of knowledge". Artists may want to consider or reflect on the colonial historical narrative enforced through the celebration of Confederation. It is important to note that the exhibition will run concurrently with Canada's 150th anniversary.

This call is open to all Black, Indigenous, People of colour (BIPOC) students across the country!
The Indigenous Student Association (ISA) is looking for two-dimensional, three-dimensional and mixed media work for an exhibition that will run from July 6, 2017 to August 31, 2017.

Submission deadline: March 31, 2017.

All submissions must be made through Submittables: 
https://torontoartscape.submittable.com/submit/75958/call-for-submissions-terra-incognita and must include 3 to 5 images, a short biography and artist statement. For more details, see exhibition call poster or send us a message via Facebook or e-mail if you have any questions!

Please like and share widely and if you would like us to send you an image file so that you may print out the poster and display it at your institution please do not hesitate to send us a message.

We are so excited to share this with you, it is a long time coming! Please consider submitting!

ABOUT INDIGENOUS STUDENT ASSOCIATION
The Indigenous Student Association (ISA) is a group of students from OCAD U who wish to create a positive, nurturing, and inclusive community. The ISA strives to collaborate and unify perspectives and thoughts, through our artworks, community involvement, and exhibitions. We are active within our communities individually, but by coming together in the IASA, we can contribute collectively and work towards a common goal.

Find out more about this and other OCAD U student-run groups: www.ocadu.ca/studentgroups

Venue & Address: 
Artscape's Daniels Spectrum 585 Dundas St E, Toronto, ON
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/ISA.OCAD/
www.instagram.com/ocaduisaofficial/
Email: 
indigenousstudentgroup@gmail.com
Terra Icognita poster

Shelley Niro Wins 2017 Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts

Shelley Niro and Ryan Rice
Thursday, February 16, 2017

OCAD U congratulates Shelley Niro (AOCA 1990) on receiving a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts. Each year, the awards honour seven artists for their artistic achievements and one person for their outstanding contribution to contemporary visual and/or media arts.

A member of the Turtle Clan of the Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) Nation, from the Six Nations of the Grand River territory, near Brantford, Ontario, she has demonstrated her dedication to producing art that contributes to Indigenous identity in Canada.

Niro creates complex visual experiences in a variety of media, including beadwork, painting, photography and film. Her work has been exhibited widely, both nationally and internationally, and she has received considerable attention for her films.

Known for challenging conventional, colonial representations of Aboriginality with directness and humour, Niro crafts and retells Indigenous narratives by drawing on lived experienced, as well as themes of identity, self-determination and liberation.

Her short film, The Shirt, was presented at the 2003 Venice Biennale and the 2004 Sundance Film Festival. In 2009, her first feature film, Kissed by Lightning, premiered at Toronto’s imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival and won the Santa Fe Film Festival’s 2009 Milagro Award for Best Indigenous Film. Niro’s work can be found in the collections of galleries and museums across Canada.

A graduate of OCAD University, Niro also studied at the Banff School of Fine Arts and received her MFA from the University of Western Ontario. To view some of Niro’s work, please visit her website.

 

 

For This Land: Inside Elemental

Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 12:00pm to Sunday, December 10, 2017 - 6:00pm

Onsite Gallery at OCAD University’s stunning new location at 199 Richmond St. W. includes a Category A designed exhibition space and media lounge as well as collection storage, study and exhibition zones. We are excited to inaugurate this 8,000 square-foot build with the following major exhibitions:
 

For This Land: Inside Elemental 
2Ro Media: Jackson 2bears and Janet Rogers
Presented with community partner imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

For this Land: Inside Elemental is part of a multi-project series by 2Ro Media,  comprised of Jackson 2bears and Janet Rogers—both Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) artists from Six Nations of the Grand River. The artists, who currently live outside their traditional territory, produce work collaboratively about ‘returning home’, which typically involves creating site-specific narratives using video, sound, poetry, performance and multi-media installation.

With Inside Elemental, the artists engage in a series of conversations with the Kana:ta Village on traditional Haudenosaunee territory in order to create an immersive multimedia installation using sound, video, performance and digital languages. Inside Elemental is an exploration of the internalization of one’s traditional territory, and in general about how external environments are deeply intertwined with identity, self-understanding, and the interiority of personal and collective experience. The exhibition brochure is available online here.

Also on view is raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000 - 2015).

For This Land: Inside Elemental


Jackson 2bears is a Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) multimedia installation/performance artist and cultural theorist originally from Six Nations of the Grand River. He is currently based in Lethbridge, Alberta. Since 1999, 2bears has exhibited his work extensively across Canada in public galleries, museums and artist-run centres, as well as internationally, in festivals and in group exhibitions.

Janet Rogers is a Mohawk/Tuscarora writer from Six Nations of the Grand River. She was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, and has lived in Stoney Creek, Hamilton and Toronto, Ontario. She has been living as a guest on the traditional lands of the Coast Salish people in Victoria, British Columbia, since 1994. Janet works in the genres of poetry, spoken word performance poetry, video poetry and recorded poetry with music. Janet is also a radio broadcaster, a documentary producer, and a media and sound artist.

imagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival
imagineNATIVE is the international centre for Indigenous-made media arts. Through year-round presentation, promotion and professional development activities, it is committed to a greater understanding by audiences of Indigenous peoples, cultures, and artistic expressions.

Public Events
- Saturday, September 23, 4 p.m.: Canadian Art Magazine’s Gallery Day with talk by Lindsay Nixon
- Saturday, September 30, 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.: Nuit Blanche at Onsite Gallery
- Tuesday, October 10, 7 p.m.: Lisa Myers Artist Talk
- Friday, October 20, 5 p.m.: imagineNATIVE Art Crawl Kick-Off
- Saturday, November 4, 2 p.m.: Mark Igloliorte Artist Talk
- Thursday, November 16, 12 to 4 p.m.: Wiki-Edit-a-Thon with the Inuit Artist Database
- Thursday, November 16, 6 p.m.: Panel Talk: Indigenous Tattoo Revitalization with Native Women in the Arts
- Saturday, December 2, 2 p.m.: Land Claims: raise a flag Pennant Workshop and Artist Presentation
- Sunday, December 3, 2 p.m.: Indigenous Art Today: Lindsay Nixon & Ryan Rice

Supporters

Onsite Gallery gratefully acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W.
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000, Ext. 456
Cost: 
FREE
Janet Rogers and Jackson 2bears
Supporters

INTERSECTION: Entrepreneurship & Indigenous Art Conference

INTERSECTION is a unique gathering of Indigenous artists, entrepreneurs, academics and students, telling success stories. The keynote speaker is Dr. Jessica Metcalfe. Stemming from enduring appropriation of Indigenous material culture, Dr. Metcalfe will speak about how her blog Beyond Buckskin applied entrepreneurship as a platform to address local and global social issues. Three distinct panels will expand discussions on emerging business ideas and social innovation approaches. A series of practical workshops using design thinking and a NEW flourishing business model methods will allow attendees to practice and test their ideas for scaling up and sustainability.

The conference will:

  • Highlight successful examples of Triple bottom line (Financial, Social, Environmental) enterprises
  • Provide practical tools and workshops for students and aspiring entrepreneurs
  • Provide success stories of income generation for organizations looking for ways to replace government funding
  • Address intersections and breakdown barriers between creative and business types
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Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 2:00pm to Sunday, November 16, 2014 - 10:00pm

FieldTrips001: Candlelight Vigil for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Annie Pootoogook, Crying Over a Death, 2002/2003
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 10:15pm to Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 12:30am

October 4th is a day to honour the lives of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit people. Students across the country will be participating in and hosting Sisters in Spirit vigils.

Cedar tree planting, candlelight vigil, Moment of Silence & painted rocks assembly at Allen Gardens
Organized by: Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto

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“FieldTrips00” is the first of the OCADSU's series of outings. The idea behind FieldTrips00 is this offers an opportunity for you to attend great events around the city with a friendly crew. This way, you don’t have to show up at events alone if you don’t want to, you can meet other OCADers across disciplines, and you have people to find the location with you - so if you get lost, we all get lost together.

Image: Annie Pootoogook, Crying Over a Death, 2002/2003
 

Venue & Address: 
Allen Gardens (located between Jarvis and Sherbourne Streets, South of Carlton Street, North of Gerrard Street) *We will meet at the northwest corner of the park (at SE part of the intersection of Carlton and Jarvis) at 6:15pm and attend the vigil together.*
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/events/1819381058292942/
Email: 
outreach@ocadsu.org
Cost: 
Free
Keywords: 

Indigenous creative culture: Gerald McMaster on Indigenous art past and present, worlds seen and beyond sight

Gerald McMaster

Since the dawn of history, art has enabled people the world over to understand themselves, their environments and their relations with others. That “ethical” dimension of art as it is brought into being by Indigenous artists is at the heart of Dr. Gerald McMaster’s current research and exhibition.

McMaster is a Plains Cree and a member of the Siksika First Nation. Since February 2016, he’s also been OCAD University’s Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Indigenous Visual Culture and Curatorial Practice (the first researcher at an art and design university to be awarded a prestigious Tier-1 CRC appointment). To this position, McMaster brings decades of experience as a writer, artist and curator who has worked at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO).

Indigenous creative culture

While his official CRC title references “visual culture,” McMaster’s research in fact challenges Western society’s longstanding privileging of sight over other senses, perhaps especially in the study of art.

“The term Indigenous creative culture suits my interests far better,” says McMaster. “When we replace ‘visual’ with ‘creative,’ we open up to a much broader spectrum of perception and expression. I have been struck, for instance, by the limitations of sight when trying to understand how past Indigenous artists took into consideration not just their material surroundings but also the unseen world. And, among contemporary Indigenous artists, I’m detecting a powerful movement to explore a wider range of sensorial experiences.”

 

 

Making contact

 

 

Vision, nevertheless, is an important metaphor in several of McMaster’s CRC research projects, notably one focusing on the reverse gaze. “For most of colonial and post-colonial history, it’s been a scholarly one-way street,” McMaster notes. “We’ve primarily concerned ourselves with how Europeans and their descendants saw and represented Indigenous peoples. But what happens when we turn the gaze around? How did Indigenous peoples see and depict newcomers?”

McMaster was first drawn to this question by the discovery on Baffin Island, in the early 1970s, of a small wooden sculpture of a Nordic traveller made by an Inuit carver ca. 1250. More recently, his interest was galvanized through involvement with the AGO’s acquisition of a rare Haida sculpture from the 1860s of a European sea captain. Since then, McMaster has broadened his scope to understand and document further examples of the reverse gaze across North America and beyond.

 

 

Arctic–Amazonia

 

 

“I’m fascinated by phenomenology,” McMaster reveals, “and by the lens it offers for understanding the interconnections among people, land, religion, other animals, art.”

On this topic, McMaster recommends David Abram’s The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-than-Human World (1996).

Could there be two more different regions than the Arctic and Amazonia? Separated by vast distances and subject to utterly different climate conditions, have the original peoples of those two zones anything in common?

As McMaster and his collaborator — Dr. Iris Edenheiser of the Reiss-Engelhorn Museen in Mannheim, Germany — endeavour to tackle these and other questions, one of the issues that fascinates them is the history of European representation of both the Arctic and Amazonia as “fantastical, mysterious” places. In addition, McMaster and Edenheiser are seeking to document the material technology Indigenous peoples used to survive in those challenging environments.

And that topic brings up a major thrust of their Arctic–Amazonia research project: “How are Indigenous artists in those regions representing one of humanity’s fiercest, most widespread threats: global climate change?”

Cape Dorset and Papunya

Image of African inspired mask projecting from third eye
Geronimo Inutiq, ULU (woman’s knife), digital print on linen, 32” x 32”, edition of 7

“The contemporary rise of ‘indigeneity’,” McMaster explains, “concerns the maintenance and expression of an Indigenous sensibility in a globalized world.” McMaster’s third CRC project — examining Indigenous artists communities at Cape Dorset (on Baffin Island) and Papunya (in Australia’s Northern Territory) — cracks open that subject by exploring the history, present and future of those “isolated” (a “southern projection”) places.

Working with Steven Gilchrist, an Indigenous scholar from Australia, McMaster hopes to illuminate the cultural, social and political forces at play in both communities. How, in Papunya and Cape Dorset, did artists who had never been trained in conventional art schools produce works that have gained such international acclaim? And how are changing economic circumstances — regionally and in the international art market — affecting Indigenous artists and their communities?

 

 

Indian Acts

 

 

Image of African inspired mask projecting from third eye
Sonny Assu, #photobomb, acrylic on panel, 40” x 84”
 

Many threads of McMaster’s Indigenous creative culture research are woven into Indian Acts: Truths in the Age of Reconciliation, an exhibition he has curated at Toronto’s Katzman Contemporary gallery. Indian Acts draws together the works of three young Indigenous artists: Sonny Assu, Nicholas Galanin and Geronimo Inutiq (madeskimo).

For McMaster, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s reports “made it clear that Canadian society remained surprisingly oblivious when it came to the nihilistic authority enshrined in the Indian Act.” Through the artists and works he selected for presentation at the Katzman, McMaster explores “a legacy that continues to reverberate among Indigenous peoples, both individually and collectively.”

 

 

With thanks to Marianne Katzmann and Dario Del Degan for generously sharing the Indian Acts exhibition images used in this article.

 

 

The art that appears at the top of this feature is Nicholas Galanin's S'igeika'awu: Ghost #002.

Author: 
Morgan Holmes
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