Eco Booth

FY Great Hall Event
Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 6:30pm to 9:30pm

The Great Hall showcases the accomplishments of this year’s first-year students with a week-long exhibition and series of exciting events. Take this opportunity to recognize the fabulous imaginations and acuity of this year’s first-year students and their works. Events highlight environmentally friendly art, wearable art, performance and new media. Be sure to check it all out!

Eco Booth:
Students of Nature & Culture sell small works made with recycled materials in support of environmental charities. Organized by faculty member Shirley Yanover.

Venue & Address: 
Great Hall 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario

Eco Booth

FY Great Hall Event
Friday, March 14, 2008 - 4:00pm to 7:30pm

The Great Hall showcases the accomplishments of this year’s first-year students with a week-long exhibition and series of exciting events. Take this opportunity to recognize the fabulous imaginations and acuity of this year’s first-year students and their works. Events highlight environmentally friendly art, wearable art, performance and new media. Be sure to check it all out!

Eco Booth:
Students of Nature & Culture sell small works made with recycled materials in support of environmental charities. Organized by faculty member Shirley Yanover.

Venue & Address: 
Great Hall 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario

Artist residencies, or why you really should take a working holiday

The residency — it is a common, if not ubiquitous, section on the CVs of today’s most celebrated artists. But what exactly happens in these sequestered havens of creativity? Why do these places continue to attract creative minds year after year?

A conversation with Pascaline Knight, an MFA candidate at OCAD University who recently completed a residency at the highly regarded Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, shed some light on these questions for me.


It’s where you’re at

A view of the Banff Centre's spectacular surroundings.
A view of the Banff Centre's spectacular surroundings, Pascaline Knight


View of Tunnel Mountain
View of Tunnel Mountain, Pascaline Knight


When Pascaline and I met for coffee we spent the first few minutes gushing over the Banff Centre’s magnificent alpine surroundings. Pascaline admitted that “location is usually one of the major attractions for artists looking to do a residency.”

Some residencies host artists in tree houses overlooking majestic forests. Some are on remote islands surrounded by ocean as far as the eye can see. And some are even located on dormant volcanoes in the tropics. The wonders of the natural world can be a great inspiration.

Not only are these locations inspiring, but they also tend to be isolated or, at least, at arm’s-length from the hubbub of city life — offering both a change of scenery and a change of pace.


Pascaline's Studio View from the Banff Centre Cafeteria, Emily Cluett



Isolation or community?

Within the wide world of residencies, a multitude provides complete isolation where artists can be alone with their thoughts. But many others, like the Banff Centre nestled deep in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains, offer group residencies. In those places, artists have private studios, but also share common spaces.

The Banff Centre is one such residency, where artists like Pascaline retreat to get away from the distracting demands of their lives in the city and settle into a new rhythm, focusing on their projects.
 

What goes on in these mysterious places?

Residencies provide not only unique spaces, but also unique experiences. According to my friend Pascaline, “unlike the rigid structure of school, the only deadlines are ones we create ourselves. And the only evaluation is self-evaluation.”

On the other hand, a residency is not completely unlike school because some programs, such as those at the Banff Centre, often bring in experts to give talks, meet with residents about their work or even collaborate on projects. What makes residencies so vital is the collegial, open spirit of creativity that comes from working in an environment where hierarchies dissipate and artists can work as peers in a communal setting.
 


Pascaline's Studio Pascaline's studio


Days and nights

Finally, a residency is a working holiday and, at the Banff Centre at least, residents know how to make the most of their time; they work hard and play hard. During the day, residents can be found experimenting in their studios or in the workshops, running ideas past their neighbours or meeting with new people to discuss potential collaborations.

Then, as the sun dips behind the nearby mountains, the networking continues. Evenings are when these creative minds get together for dinner and drinks, or perhaps a hike in their glorious natural surroundings. Even if they don’t get as much work done as they had hoped, the residency experience is nevertheless invaluable, because artists can make connections with the many talented individuals drawn to the program from all over the world.

Regardless of what happens in the woods, on an island or in the shadow of majestic mountains, there is always something to be gained from an artist’s residency. All you have to do is apply.

 

Emily Cluett is an emerging curator enrolled in OCAD University’s Criticism & Curatorial Practice MFA program. She recently spent a few days at the Banff Centre nourishing her creative and scholarly practice.

Author: 
Emily Cluett
Template: 
Standard Template

Earth, Sea, and Sky

Andrea Woermke, Sphere, Sheet metal and steel rods, 2016
Thursday, July 7, 2016 - 1:00pm to Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 11:00pm

A group exhibition exploring nature by artists from fibre, sculpture, and video courses in Continuing Studies at OCAD University. Landscapes, seascapes, flora, and fauna are featured in a wide range of media.

July 7 - September 8, 2016

Join us for the closing reception on Thursday, September 8, 5-7 pm.

Venue & Address: 
Continuing Studies Gallery, 285 Dundas Street West, Mon - Fri, 9 am - 5 pm
Website: 
http://continuingstudies.ocad.ca
Email: 
continuingstudies@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x 2321
ESS Poster

Student Gallery Island Residency Call For Applications!

Monday, May 16, 2016 - 10:00pm

Student Gallery Island Residency

Artscape Gibraltar Point, Toronto Island

Student Gallery Island Residency is a week-long interdisciplinary residency open to current OCAD University students. Artscape Gibraltar Point will be your weeklong home base to practice, create and explore the intersections of nature and culture. We encourage artists and designers from all OCAD U programs to apply. This is a weeklong self-directed residency and is the perfect opportunity to explore your practice and the sounding landscape of Toronto Island.

Your home base will be a large city facing studio at AGP that will be shared with OCAD U Student Gallery staff. 5 ferry tickets will be provided.

Student Gallery Island Residency is open during 3, one-week residencies in June, July and August.

  1. June 20 - 25
  2. July 15 - 19
  3. Aug 22 – 27

Deadlines

May 16th:  Applications due

June 10th: Applicants notified of acceptance

All applicants must be current OCAD U students.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Please submit a 250-word application letter telling us about yourself, your practice, what program you are in and why you would like this opportunity. Submit 8 images that best represent your body of work or what you would like to work on during your stay and a current CV.

Please send proposals by e-mail to studentgallery@ocadu.ca by Monday, May 16th, 2016 with the subject line: “Student Gallery Island Residency

 

Application Guidelines (Attachments or Dropbox Links):

  • Application letter (250-word maximum .doc or PDF)
  • Current CV (.doc or PDF)
  • Up to 8 images (jpegs, maximum 1M each) of past work or/ proposed project
  • For time-based projects, maximum 5 minutes of video-support material (.mov, .m4v, vimeo or youtube)
Venue & Address: 
Please send all applications to 52 McCaul Street OCAD U Student Gallery
Email: 
studentgallery@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
OCAD U Student Gallery Island Residency with event info and photo of seagulls on beach

Camping just got a little more fun — meet the water-powered USB charger

Photo of water-powered USB charger, Coast, being towed behind a canoe
Photo of James Cowan, Industrial Design OCAD grad

Industrial design student Jesse Cowan has solved a problem.

There’s been a boom in enabled gear for outdoor adventurers — Bluetooth fish-finders connected to your phone, Bluetooth speakers and tons of maps and mobile apps for hiking and camping. But how do you charge your devices when you’re off the grid?

Jesse’s created Coast, a USB charger that you toss into the water and clip to your boat. As the charger floats and is pulled in the water, the spinning powers a kinetic turbine. The 7,000 mAh battery can charge your iPhone five times over.

“This is why I love design. It didn’t exist and now it does — I love being creative and making something real” said Jesse. He loves outdoor adventure and noticed there wasn’t anything on the market that could power his gear with water. “It’s a step forward for people to produce our own energy. It’s industrial product design with a meaning.”

Jesse manufactured Coast himself, including using a 3D printer to create the device’s shell. He grew up in Toronto but initially studied anthropology and sociology at Concordia University in Montreal. After first year, he transferred to OCAD University to study industrial design.

Coast won an Umbra Award for industrial design at Grad Ex and Jesse has joined OCAD U's Imagination Catalyst start-up incubator.

Camping just got a little more fun – Meet the water-powered USB charger

Jesse Cowan
Coast
Coast
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 8:00pm

Industrial Design student Jesse Cowan has solved a problem.

There’s been a boom in enabled gear for outdoor adventurers – Bluetooth fish-finders connected to your phone, Bluetooth speakers and tons of maps and mobile apps for hiking and camping. But, how do you charge your devices when you’re off the grid?

Jesse’s created Coast, a USB charger that you toss into the water and clip to your canoe or boat. As the charger floats and is pulled in the water, the spinning powers a kinetic turbine. The 7,000 mAh battery can charge your iPhone five times over.

“This is why I love design. It didn’t exist and now it does – I love being creative and making something real,” said Jesse. He loves outdoor adventure and noticed there wasn’t anything on the market that could power his gear with water. “It’s a step forward for people to produce our own energy. It’s industrial product design with a meaning.”

Jesse manufactured Coast himself including using a 3D printer to create the device’s shell. He grew up in Toronto, but initially studied anthropology and sociology at Concordia University in Montreal. After first year he transferred to OCAD University to study industrial design.

What’s next? Jesse’s met with some start-up incubators and considering his options. Coast won an Umbra Award for industrial design at Grad Ex and he’s entered the ACIDO Industrial Design Thesis Competition happening in June.

 

If you have your own wicked idea for a product or business, consider applying to OCAD U’s Imagination Catalyst start-up incubator. We’ll help you take your idea to market. The deadline to submit is May 27.

Invasive Species: April Hickox

Image of a forest with hanging trees tied to branches
Saturday, November 22, 2014 - 5:00am

 

April Hickox is a lens-based artist, teacher, and independent curator who lives on the Toronto Islands. Her artwork includes: photography, film, video, installation, and site interactions. Hickox's work is based in narratives – the passage from one experience to another in the life process – that encompass history, memory, and place. She has been supported by all levels of funding throughout her career, and has exhibited both nationally and internationally. As an active community leader, she is the founding director of the Gallery 44 Center for Contemporary Photography, as well as a founding member of Tenth Muse Studio and Artscape. Hickox is also a co-curator of the Art with Heart fundraiser for Casey House. She holds the position of Associate Professor of Photography at the Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD U). Most recently, Hickox's work was featured in A Noble Line, curated by Marnie Fleming. Katzman Contemporary represents April Hickox.

Opening November 22, 2014

Venue & Address: 
Katzman Contemporary 86 Miller St  Toronto
Website: 
http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/aprilhickox
Email: 
<p><a href="mailto:info@katzmancontemporary.com" target="_blank">info@katzmancontemporary.com</a></p>
Phone: 
<p>416 654 9515</p>
Cost: 
Free

INTRINSIC

Friday, October 17, 2014 - 4:00am to Sunday, November 23, 2014 - 5:00am

 

SHEA CHANG | INTRINSIC |Opening Reception

Referencing time lapse footage of growing plants, of underwater life forms in movement, this painting series aims to condense naturally existing forms and their movement into one image frame. Abstractions of feathers, jellyfish, tsunamis or overgrown foliage, these constructed forms describe the lapse between disparate natural environments and bring to focus what is inherent in all of nature.

ARTiculations | Earl Selkirk Gallery Hours
Monday - Friday: 11 AM - 7 PM
Saturday: 11 AM - 5 PM
Sunday: 12 - 5 PM

2928 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M6P 1Y8

For more information visit:
www.ARTiculations.ca
www.sheachang.com

Please join us for the Opening Reception of "INTRINSIC" Friday October 17th 7-10pm.

Venue & Address: 
Earl Selkirk Gallery 2928 Dundas St. W. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Material over Matter

Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 4:00pm

OCADU Instructor: Mark Tholen will give a professional talk

Mark Tholen is a Toronto architect, industrial designer and assistant professor at OCAD U. He has designed buildings in Germany, the US and Canada. In his industrial design found objects and the beauty of natural materials as well as the process of making play a major role in his work.

Venue & Address: 
Room 530 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

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