Casting Seams

Casting Seams Event Poster
Saturday, June 21, 2014 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 4:00am

Opening Weekend: Saturday June 21, 3:00pm-6:00pm and Sunday June 22 10:00am-4:00pm
Exhibition Hours: Thursday-Sunday 10:00am-4:00pm
Please note: Casting Seams is only open at the private residence - where the shards were found on the Histori

2014 IAMD Thesis Exhibition by Martha Griffith

Please join the Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design Program and the Graduate Studies Department in celebrating the IAMD Thesis Exhibition of MFA Candidate Martha Griffith.

Casting Seams presents a collection of handmade ceramic plate multiples based on found 19th century Blue Willow plate shards. Repeatedly cast and re-cast, the forms shed light on the matrix of positive and negative space in order to examine processes of reconstruction – that of the plates themselves and of the stories that are embedded within the found fragments.

This site-responsive exhibition takes place at and between two relational locations in Grey County: the South Grey Museum in Flesherton, and 7 km away at the site where the shards were found on the former property of Edward Patterson, an early black settler, preacher, and stagecoach driver believed to have been held in slavery in Maryland, U.S.

Casting Seams seeks to make visible the concealed networks of both the material origin of the remnants and their accompanying narratives. From the earth to the museum context, the shards materially dialogue with private and public spaces – environments where meanings and materials are made and remade – re-formulating old meanings with new objects ‘in situ.’

Throughout spring and summer 2014 graduating candidates from OCAD University’s Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design (IAMD) program will present their thesis work in galleries across Toronto. These exhibitions explore a wide variety of interdisciplinary subject matter and media including, drawing & painting, video, performance, ceramics, printmaking, digital technology, sculpture and installation.

Venue & Address: 
South Grey Museum & Historical Library 40 Sydenham St. Flesherton, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.southgreymuseum.ca  
Email: 
arowe@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
<p>416 977-6000 ext 4366</p>
Cost: 
Free

Par Amour | Paramour

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 3:15pm

New exhibition at MOCCA featuring the work of IAMD Alumnus Andrew Zealley

An intimate portrayal of gay male sexuality and beauty in the face of mortality is on view in Par amour / Paramour. From Stephen Andrews’ iconic Facsimile drawings that memorialize men lost to AIDS-related illnesses in the early 90s, to Robert Flack’s ornate depictions of the male body as a vessel of tantric power in response to his own diagnosis as HIV+, the exhibition features drawings, prints, photography, and an ambient audio soundtrack by Andrew Zealley that together etch a moving and emotional record of a community that came of age through its adversity in the face of loss. The show takes its title from Jean-Luc Verna’s work that subverts an emblematic Hollywood studio name and logo to reference the existence of a “paramour,” an illicit lover, as well as to an act done “par amour”: by love.

Stephen Andrews / Robert Flack / Jean-Luc Verna / Andrew Zealley

Organized by MOCCA and the National Gallery of Canada

Venue & Address: 
Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art 952 Queen St West Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.mocca.ca/blog/exhibition/par-amour-paramour/
Cost: 
Free

Oh, Canada

Event Poster
Friday, June 27, 2014 - 4:00am to Thursday, January 1, 2015 - 5:00am

Featuring OCAD U alumni

Canada is the second largest country in the world by area and boasts both a vibrant nationwide arts community and a strong public commitment to culture. And yet Canadian contemporary art has not received widespread attention outside Canada's borders. The largest survey of contemporary Canadian art ever produced outside Canada, Oh Canada features work by more than 60 artists who hail from every province and nearly every territory in the country, spanning multiple generations and working in all media. MASS MoCA's curator Denise Markonish spent the last three years crisscrossing Canada to view hundreds of exhibitions in museums and galleries, visiting over 400 artists' studios, and making connections with a full range of artists working in Canada today.

Markonish's extensive research brings this project the fresh perspective of an informed and curious outsider. While Oh, Canada will ask questions such as "What are some of the distinguishing characteristics of art made in the country?" its aim is not to present a merely nationalistic show. Rather, the goal is to encourage a dialogue about contemporary art made in Canada (one touching on issues of craft/making, conceptualism, humor and identity), a dialogue that will resonate just as deeply for Canadians as for outsiders.

Kim Adams, Gisele Amantea, Shuvinai Ashoona, Amalie Atkins, Nicolas Baier, Daniel Barrow, Dean Baldwin, Rebecca Belmore, Patrick Bernatchez, BGL, Valérie Blass, Shary Boyle, Bill Burns, Eric Cameron, Cedar Tavern Singers AKA Les Phonorealistes, Janice Wright Cheney, Douglas Coupland, Ruth Cuthand, Dave and Jenn, Michel De Broin, Wally Dion, Mario Doucette, Marcel Dzama, Brendan Fernandes, Michael Fernandes, Eryn Foster, Noam Gonick and Luis Jacob, Hadley + Maxwell, David R. Harper, David Hoffos, Kristan Horton, Terrance Houle, Allison Hrabluik, Sarah Anne Johnson, Garry Neill Kennedy, Wanda Koop, Diane Landry, Micah Lexier, Craig Leonard, Myfanwy MacLeod, Kelly Mark, Luanne Martineau, Rita McKeough, Divya Mehra, Chris Millar, Kent Monkman, Kim Morgan, Andrea Mortson, Clint Neufeld, Graeme Patterson, Ed Pien, Annie Pootoogook, Ned Pratt, Michael Snow, Charles Stankievech, Joseph Tisiga, Hans Wendt, Janet Werner, Mitchell Wiebe, John Will, and Étienne Zack.

Ten other new commissions will join 95 already existing works (made within the past five years) for the exhibition including: Micah Lexier’s A Coin in Every Corner comprised of a series of specially minted coins painstakingly installed in corners throughout the multi-building factory campus; Kent Monkman’s double diorama based on fictitious buddy characters Tonto and the Lone Ranger, and Germany’s Winnetou and Old Shatterhand; and Ed Pien’s installation made from cut paper and projected video; and new work from Terrance Houle, Divya Mehra, Graeme Patterson, Garry Neill Kennedy, Mitchell Wiebe, Craig Leonard, Janice Wright Cheney and David Harper.

A comprehensive full-color 450-page catalogue by MIT Press will accompany the exhibition and will provide insights into Canada’s thriving contemporary cultural scene. The book will guide readers through the provinces and territories of Canada, introducing them to Canada’s cultural topography and the artists who inhabit it. Markonish will provide a history of recent Canadian art, placing this new body of work into the context of 20th-century Canadian art. Featuring artist-to-artist interviews, the book also includes contributions from notable Canadian writers and poets Lisa Moore, Warren Cariou, Douglas Coupland, and Jane Urquhart. Contributing curators include John Murchie, Wayne Baerwaldt, Lance Blomgren, Candice Hopkins, David Liss, Lesley Johnstone, Steven Holmes, Louise Déry, Sarah Fillmore, Pan Wendt, Bruce Johnson, Cliff Eyland, Jen Budney, and Nancy Campbell.

When the exhibition opens in Atlantic Canada, Oh Canada will span two provinces, with art to be on display at:

-The Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown
-The Owens Art Gallery in Sackville, NB
-The Louise and Reuben Cohen Art Gallery at the University of Moncton
-The Galerie Sans Nom in Moncton.

In Calgary, the show will spread out throughout the city, including:

-The Glenbow
-The Esker Foundation
-The Illingworth Kerr Gallery at ACAD
-The Nickel Galleries at the University of Calgary

Visitors to MASS MoCA's exhibit Oh Canada in North Adams, Mass. examine Calgary artist Gisele Amantea's work Democracy. (MASS MoCA)

Website: 
http://www.massmoca.org/event_details.php?id=663
Cost: 
Free

Let's Get Lost - A Walking/Reading Group on the Dismantling of Subjects and Spaces

Event Poster
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 10:00pm to Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 12:00am

Hosted by Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy

Responding to the proposition that we ‘get rid of ourselves’, this biweekly walking/reading group explores the spatial construction of subjectivity. Discussions focus around selected articles that highlight the contradictory values of individual freedom and private property underpinning the principle of the autonomous modern subject, as they appear in our contemporary moment of neoliberalism.

The belief in the free, autonomous subject, which emerged with 19th century Liberalism, produced the two great modern subjects: the proletariat, a worker “freed” from his or her obligations to the land, and the bourgeois owner who controlled the means and sites of production. While in our contemporary period the clear distinction between these two subjects as been blurred, we call this moment Neoliberalism because it involves of a return to Liberalism’s core principles. Contemporary economies emphasize individual creativity and self-reliance, while at the same time privatizing all public assets. It is no wonder that in the face of this contemporary political landscape, we are exploring new ways of dismantling, dissolving and erasing the self.

The journal Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy has been exploring these ideas for the past four years, through its first eight issues: Property, Service, Materialism, Realism, Currency, Excess, Mexico DF/NAFTA and Incarceration. The reading group, facilitated by Adrian Blackwell and Marcin Kedzior, will examine the relationship between subjectivity and space by reading texts that have appeared in Scapegoat. For the first hour of each meeting, we will walk in the city, discussing the readings in pairs (a technique modeled on the Walking / Reading Group on Participation developed in 2013 by Ania Bas and Simone Mair). For the second hour, we will assemble in the gallery on Adrian Blackwell’s sculpture Circles Describing Spheres to connect the initial conversations.

The group will meet at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond St. W. from 6-8pm, every second Tuesday: August 5, August 19, September 2, September 16. Meet at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond St. W. To register and receive the readings please email onsite@ocadu.ca

Readings:

August 5 - The Origins of Property in Liberal Individualism
Brett Neilson and Sandro Mezzadra, Fabrica Mundi: Producing the World by Drawing Borders
Shiri Pasternak, Property in Three Registers

August 19 - Precarious Actors of Neoliberal Urbanization
Irmgard Emmelhainz, The Mexican Neoliberal Conversion and Differentiated, Homogenous Lives
AbdouMaliq Simone, Water, Politics and Design in Jakarta

September 2 - Opened by the World
Georges Bataille, The Economy Equal to the Universe
Jane Bennett and Alexander Livingston, Philosophy in the Wild: Listening to Things in Baltimore
Jesse Boon, Kids on Buildings: Echos, Mirrors, and Ghosts

September 16 - Commonism, or Caring With Others
Wendy Jacob and Gina Badger, In the Presence of Another Being
Paige Sarlin, Vulnerable Accumulation: A Practical Guide
Isabelle Stengers and Erik Bordeleau, The Care of the Possible

The reading group will be facilitated by Scapegoat’s Adrian Blackwell and Marcin Kedzior.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite [at] OCAD 230 Richmond St. W. Street Level Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite &nbsp;
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
<p>416-977-6000 Ext. 265</p>
Cost: 
Free

Common Fate

artists work
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 8:15pm

A work by OCAD U alumna Zeesy Powers. Part of SummerWorks Festival

Common Fate is an algorithmic performance. Animations, music and a series of dances cycle through one another, creating distinct three-minute performances. As the show unfolds, the solos are combined into duos, triplets, and full-cast choreography, while musical themes layer in the increasingly complex live score. Watercolour animations provide a dreamlike cast to the bodies in motion, projected environments that shift between the concrete and symbolic. What seemed tragic in one context becomes laughable in another, what appeared silly takes on depth. We perceive individuals moving in parallel paths as a unified group, regardless of any actual connection between them. In moments of harmony and dissonance, we invent meaning from an empty plot.

Common Fate features performances from Amelia Ehrhardt, Emily Law, Julia Male and Chelsea Omel, with music composed and performed by Isla Craig, Brodie West and Andrew Zukerman.

Tuesday August 12, 6:30pm
Saturday August 16, 6:00pm
Sunday August 17, 5:00pm

Venue & Address: 
The Theatre Centre Incubator 1115 Queen St. W. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
Cost: 
$15

I Will Tell You Exactly What I Think of You

image of a woman with a square around her mouth
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 4:00am to Saturday, August 16, 2014 - 4:00am

A work by OCAD U alumna Zeesy Powers. Part of SummerWorks Festival

I Will Tell You Exactly What I Think of You is an emotional endurance test, a talk show where the host is there to work out her desires and prejudices, using the audience as a cipher. Simultaneously fulfilling and questioning the urge to see oneself reflected in another, the audience seeks something of themselves in the answers. Self-selecting as guests, they submit themselves to a public reading from a stranger bound to tell them exactly what she thinks of them. SummerWorks marks the first time this popular work will be performed as a live-streamed web-series in front of a studio audience. Like a rollercoaster, you take your seat and hold on until it’s over.

Wednesday August 13, 6:00pm
Friday August 15, 7:00pm
Saturday August 16, 8:00pm

Venue & Address: 
Theatre Centre Incubator 1115 Queen St. W. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
Cost: 
$15

Design with Dialogue

Design with dioluge logo
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 10:00pm to Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 1:00am

Re-generating the Soul of the City: Placemaking Toronto with Michael Jones

Join us for August's DwD, as Michael Jones leads us in an exploration of placemaking Toronto and we celebrate the launch of his new book, The Soul of Place: Reimagining Leadership through Nature, Art and Community.

We have an ongoing need for conversations about restoring the health of the polis and commons,of place and place-making, and in so doing regenerating the soul of the city. To be regenerative is to make the invisible visible - this includes making visible the places of the heart and the ethos defining character or tone of the city including its sense of self, its transformative potential and its special uniqueness.

Re-generating the Commons. How might we move beyond mid-stream strategic and tactical conversations? Too often they simply involve rearranging business as usual, and don’t get to the heart or the ethos of what really matters and so nothing fundamental changes in how we uniquely see and experience our world. To see and to truly make visible the hidden potential involves gathering together in ways that may bring about shifts of mind. We can achieve this through asking questions about destiny and divine purpose, about roots and legacy and about how the seeds of our future can be found nested in the historic significance of the stories from our past.

Conversations regarding destiny and regenerating the commons and health of the whole naturally involve thinking like artists, designers and storytellers or ecologists. It is through the evocative power of a living language that we can shift the predominant paradigm from problem solving to pattern thinking and our predominant focus from a sustainable to a thrivable city. Seeing the soul of the city as an energy system and a space not only for commerce but as a communion of gifts and a space for life will be our new paradigm for the future.

Pre- Assignment: To prepare for this session you are invited to take random walks or strolls through different neighbourhoods and engage strangers in conversations to ask what makes Toronto special and listen for what the soul of ethos of the city means to them.

About the Host
Michael is a leadership educator, dialogue facilitator, writer and Juno-nominated pianist/composer. His most recent book, The Soul of Place, is the third in a series on Re-imagining Leadership. Others in the series include Artful Leadership and the award-winning Creating an Imaginative Life.

Michael has also been a thought leader with the MIT Dialogue Project and Dialogos and other prominent leading edge universities and centres. He has co-chaired several place-based initiatives and spoken on the leader's emerging role as placemaker in a variety of forums including The Authentic Leadership in Action Conferences (ALIA), The Society for Organizational Learning (SoL) and many others.

As a pianist/composer Michael has composed and recorded fifteen CD's of his original piano compositions and performed as a solo pianist across North America as well as Korea and Japan. He has been integrating his music in his leadership and dialogue work for over twenty years.

Design with Dialogue
Design with Dialogue (DwD) is an open community of practice learning together to lead organizational & community change through participatory design, strategic dialogue and emerging facilitation methods.

We gather monthly to convene workshops as a practice in social design to engage the organizations, projects, and civic communities to which we're committed.

Join us from 6-9pm on the second Wednesday of every month at OCAD's Lambert Lounge.

DwD is coordinated by:

Peter Jones
OCADU professor and Principal at Redesign

Greg Judelman
Chief Design Officer at The Moment

Kaitlin Almack
Process Facilitator at ICA Associates

Christopher Lee
Principal at Potluck Projects

Venue & Address: 
Lambert Lounge, Room 187 100 McCaul Street Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://bit.ly/1pvzHOu
Email: 
<p><a href="mailto:pjones@ocadu.ca">pjones@ocadu.ca</a></p>
Cost: 
Free

O-DAYS! Photo ID & Locker Rental

Friday, August 15, 2014 - 1:00am to Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 8:00pm

Service Days/Hours: August/September 2014

AUGUST Photo ID:
New and returning students are welcome to stop by to have their PHOTO ID taken during August.
Location: 115 McCaul Street, Level 1
Hours: Monday to Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm

RAD Photos:
Did you have your photo taken during Registration Assistance Days (RAD) in June? You can pick up your Photo ID at the Office of the Registrar (115 McCaul Street, Level 2) 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. Government-issued photo ID is required.

SEPTEMBER Photo ID & Lockers:
Location: Great Hall (Level 2, 100 McCaul Street)

September 2 #ODAYS14
(12 pm to 4:00 pm)
NEW students only

September 3 and 4
(9:00 am to 4:00 pm)
NEW students only

September 5, 8, 9, 10
(9:00 am to 4:00 pm)
New AND returning students

AFTER September 10:
Location: Campus Facilities office
115 McCaul Street, Level 1
(9:00 am to 4:00 pm)

Photo ID:
For new students, there is no cost for your Photo ID Card. You must bring government-issued photo ID and proof of registration (print the page from My Records showing registered courses) or a copy of your tuition receipt. Pick up ID cards next business day in Office of Registrar (115 McCaul Street, Level 2) 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. Government-issued photo ID is required. (Replacement cards are $20)

Locker Rental:
The cost is $15 (cash only) for both fall/winter semesters. One locker per student. Locks are supplied by OCAD U.

Venue & Address: 
Misc. Locations 100/115 McCaul Street Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/orientation &nbsp;
Email: 
ocaducampuslife@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
Event Poster

OCAD U Senate Meeting

Monday, August 18, 2014 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm

OCAD University Senate - Summer Authority Meeting

The Senate is responsible for the establishment and regulation of academic policy, standards, and procedures at OCAD University. In particular, the Senate and its many committees are in charge of all matters pertaining to OCAD University’s academic resources, academic programming, academic strategic planning, student affairs, and any other such matters relating to academic issues.

Membership of Senate consists predominantly of senior faculty but also includes undergraduate and graduate student representation as well as a representation of the academic administration.

The Senate normally meets on the fourth week of every month during the academic year.

Venue & Address: 
Room 7301 205 Richmond St West Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/governance/senate.htm &nbsp;
Email: 
nnanton@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000, Ext. 2856
Cost: 
Free

Let's Get Lost - A Walking/Reading Group on the Dismantling of Subjects and Spaces

Event Poster
Tuesday, August 19, 2014 - 10:00pm to Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 12:00am

Let's Get Lost - A Walking/Reading Group on the Dismantling of Subjects and Spaces: August 19, 6 to 8 p.m.

Hosted by Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy

Responding to the proposition that we ‘get rid of ourselves’, this biweekly walking/reading group explores the spatial construction of subjectivity. Discussions focus around selected articles that highlight the contradictory values of individual freedom and private property underpinning the principle of the autonomous modern subject, as they appear in our contemporary moment of neoliberalism.

The belief in the free, autonomous subject, which emerged with 19th century Liberalism, produced the two great modern subjects: the proletariat, a worker “freed” from his or her obligations to the land, and the bourgeois owner who controlled the means and sites of production. While in our contemporary period the clear distinction between these two subjects as been blurred, we call this moment Neoliberalism because it involves of a return to Liberalism’s core principles. Contemporary economies emphasize individual creativity and self-reliance, while at the same time privatizing all public assets. It is no wonder that in the face of this contemporary political landscape, we are exploring new ways of dismantling, dissolving and erasing the self.

The journal Scapegoat: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy has been exploring these ideas for the past four years, through its first eight issues: Property, Service, Materialism, Realism, Currency, Excess, Mexico DF/NAFTA and Incarceration. The reading group, facilitated by Adrian Blackwell and Marcin Kedzior, will examine the relationship between subjectivity and space by reading texts that have appeared in Scapegoat. For the first hour of each meeting, we will walk in the city, discussing the readings in pairs (a technique modeled on the Walking / Reading Group on Participation developed in 2013 by Ania Bas and Simone Mair). For the second hour, we will assemble in the gallery on Adrian Blackwell’s sculpture Circles Describing Spheres to connect the initial conversations.

The group will meet at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond St. W. from 6-8pm, every second Tuesday: August 5, August 19, September 2, September 16. Meet at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond St. W. To register and receive the readings please email onsite@ocadu.ca

Readings:

August 5 - The Origins of Property in Liberal Individualism
Brett Neilson and Sandro Mezzadra, Fabrica Mundi: Producing the World by Drawing Borders
Shiri Pasternak, Property in Three Registers

August 19 - Precarious Actors of Neoliberal Urbanization
Irmgard Emmelhainz, The Mexican Neoliberal Conversion and Differentiated, Homogenous Lives
AbdouMaliq Simone, Water, Politics and Design in Jakarta

September 2 - Opened by the World
Georges Bataille, The Economy Equal to the Universe
Jane Bennett and Alexander Livingston, Philosophy in the Wild: Listening to Things in Baltimore
Jesse Boon, Kids on Buildings: Echos, Mirrors, and Ghosts

September 16 - Commonism, or Caring With Others
Wendy Jacob and Gina Badger, In the Presence of Another Being
Paige Sarlin, Vulnerable Accumulation: A Practical Guide
Isabelle Stengers and Erik Bordeleau, The Care of the Possible

The reading group will be facilitated by Scapegoat’s Adrian Blackwell and Marcin Kedzior.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite [at] OCAD 230 Richmond St. W. Street Level Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/onsite &nbsp;
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
<p>416-977-6000 Ext. 265</p>
Cost: 
Free

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