IoT Collaboration

About IoT Collaboration:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a broad emerging technology that touches upon a host of industries and applications as a backend coordination and interaction medium. It typically involves sensing, analytics, visualization, and network communication.

This work targets the exploration and development of a new IoT platform, LACE-Net, for bridging users with their environments and each other. As such, it considers:

a) how to display information to users and allow for fluent user interactions in IoT spaces;
b) how to maintain trust and privacy between users of IoT information in their  interactions; and
c) how to apply these designs for effective user to user interaction, coordination, and collaboration in IoT environments, while gauging the dynamics of IoT organizations in action.

The potential use cases of the adaptive and privacy elements of IoT are vast, impacting varied stakeholder domains. With the combined perspectives of users, groups of users, and the overall IoT system, managers of IoT deployed systems of all kinds can gain valuable insights that can have an impact on policy-making and governmental decisions. Such a system can have an impact on mitigating the number of information silos within organizations by allowing for multi-level collaborations to be formed.

 

Click below to learn more about the Internet of Things and current ACE-Lab research:
IoT Interaction
IoT Assistants
IoT Frameworks and Platforms
IoT Privacy
 

Creator: 
Blue Internet of Things Project Banner. Digital images of a planet, world map, and devices connected by glowing blue networks.
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 10:15am
Lab Member: 
Alexis Morris
Nadine Lessio

IoT Privacy

About Privacy in the IoT:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a broad emerging technology that touches upon a host of industries and applications as a backend coordination and interaction medium. It typically involves sensing, analytics, visualization, and network communication.

Privacy in the Internet of Things, due to the inherent need to collect and share large sets of personal, sensory data, is essential, and is a present and clear challenge. Research is needed to ensure that the sensitive information being obtained is safely and securely handled, designed, and distributed. This is a significant research challenge and has an impact that is cross institutional, governmental, and global-impacting, for both individuals, organizations, and groups. This work aims to address this challenge with a new privacy-enabled IoT approach, particularly for adaptive IoT.

 

Click below to learn more about the Internet of Things and current ACE-Lab research:
IoT Interaction
IoT Assistants
IoT Frameworks and Platforms
IoT Collaboration

Read more about ACE Lab and the standard definitions of IoT here.

Creator: 
Blue Internet of Things Project Banner. Digital images of a planet, world map, and devices connected by glowing blue networks.
Monday, January 29, 2018 - 1:45pm
Lab Member: 
Alexis Morris
Nadine Lessio

Digital Governance

Digital governance is the central challenge facing governing institutions and societies in the coming decades where information knows no boundaries, power is dispersed and authority and accountability need to be reconceived. What is digital governance and why is 'digital' a governance issue?

Westminster parliamentary democracy is widely credited with a high capacity to adapt to societal evolution. Its ability to adapt to the realities of a digital society is putting this claim to the test. Westminster governments were never designed with the digital era in mind. Two forces – digital and governance – are meeting like tectonic plates, shifting the landscape and giving rise to new peaks and valleys around key governance questions that all Canadians need to be concerned about: Who has real power? How should decisions be made? How can all players make their voices heard and ensure that account is rendered?

Digital Governance, an sLab research project, explores unprecedented challenges and opportunities facing governing institutions and associated groups in the digital era. Through research and engagement activities the project develops a network equipped to understand these dynamics and to guide innovation. The initial partners are University of Victoria, Institute on Governance (IOG), OCAD University, Dalhousie University, and MIGHTY Purpose. Together with additional partners (to be identified) the Digital Governance team will build a digital governance research network.

Project Objectives:

  • Provide a platform for a national conversation on the issues and possibilities of digital technology and governance. The partnership has established itself as a Digital Governance Commission – a modernized, virtual royal commission that combines visibility, engagement and evidence based research, and that engages Canadians to develop practical solutions.
  • Recognize that the discussion must move beyond technological change to an understanding of the disruptive nature of digital transformation as an historic opportunity to recast the role and responsibilities of governments, citizens and other actors.
  • Explore emerging governance challenges and possibilities, but also specific practice areas such as evidence based policy analysis, advising ministers and legislators, citizen engagement, modernizing service delivery and realigning administrative systems to meet new and ever increasing demands on the part of governments at all levels.
  • Examine the new and emerging governance challenges of the Westminster system in light of the advent of digital, and to determine the transformative and evolutionary changes required of government and non-government actors in an evolving democratic environment across Canada.
  • Determine and articulate the new, core competencies required of all stakeholders and institutions (e.g. politicians, public servants, citizens, the private sector, and students) in the digital age.
  • Design a research program with windows of opportunity in mind in order to maximize impact and generate practical impetus for change.
  • Articulate the value brought to key stakeholders and include open, transparent and participatory methodologies on an ongoing basis.

 

For further information, please visit http://slab.ocadu.ca/project/digital-governance

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

Large text reading "Digital Governance: transforming government practice in the diigtal era"
SSHRC Logo
Monday, October 23, 2017 - 12:30pm
Lab Member: 
Greg Van alstyne
Peter Jones