Art Aloud: The Scotiabank Nuit Blanche Lecture Series: City as Canvas

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche
Thursday, September 27, 2007 - 10:30pm

The Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2007 Lecture Series encourages discussions, dialogue and discourse leading up to the night of event. With participation from local and international artists from various mediums involved in Scotiabank Nuit Blanche these are sure to be lively and thought-provoking conversations.
Panel Discussion: City as Canvas
Thursday September 27, 6:30 to 8:30 pm
How does the twelve-hour duration of Nuit Blanche influence the artistic process, and what is the nature of an event that is impermanent and ephemeral? Featuring local, national and international artists, this panel will address urban space, public art and site-specificity.
Moderated by Toronto Star urban issues reporter Christopher Hume.
Panellists include:
Sara Graham: As a Toronto-based artist Sara Graham's practice centres on explorations of geographic fictions that blur the disciplines of art, architecture, urban design and geography.
Millie Chen: An active member of a number of artist-run organizations, Millie Chen's practice encompasses collaborative interdisciplinary projects that engage the public and public space.
Adad Hannah: Based in Montreal, Adad Hannah works in video and photography.
Dyan Marie: Artist and gallerist Dyan Marie explores urban issues, ideas and reflections on contemporary cultural experience. Dyan Marie Projects focuses her curatorial and artistic practices on the Lansdowne and Dupont neighbourhood where she lives.
Craig Walsh: Craig Walsh lives in Brisbane, Australia. Primarily interested in hybrid / site-specific projects and the exploration of alternative contexts for contemporary art, his work often utilizes projection in response to existing environments and contexts. He has been working across a range of art forms including theatre, architecture, public works, gallery exhibitions and festivals.

Venue & Address: 
Auditorium 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

Faculty of Art faculty and alumni participate in: 'in/Future', closing this weekend

Black and White Photo of the Ontario Place structure
photo of performance art, two people on either side of a floating raft divided by a wall
3 photos of an illuminated watchtower
brightly coloured geometic shapes in a cave like setting
Lightbox installation with circular designs
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 4:00am to Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 4:00am

This 11-day exhibition has transformed the desolate remains of Ontario Place into a remarkable new platform displaying the projects and performances of over 100 Artist & Musicians.  Explore the multidisciplinary art projects created and curated specially for in/future. Enter the majestic and haunting silos where you’ll encounter immersive artworks, explore the South Shore, the Temple Bell Plaza and the winding picturesque paths to find a wide array of outdoor installations. Visit the Arcade and Atom Blaster Pavilions to see group exhibitions from an impressive range of artists from various disciplines.  A number of the artists involved are part of the Faculty of Art community, below is a sampling of the work on exhibit!

Project Descriptions:

Faculty of Art faculty Adam David Brown’s Moonlight explores illumination as the realm of both the celestial and commercial. Fascinated by science and language, the Toronto-based artist’s work often addresses systems of knowledge and their influences on our understandings of the world around us. Beckoning visitors with its vintage 1970s typeface, his monumental, free-standing sign broadcasts an image of the moon’s surface. Despite its photographic simulation of the moon’s cold light, Brown’s sign betrays an underlying artificiality: like many things in a theme-park environment, Moonlight offers a glimpse at something sublime and fantastical, but only ultimately delivers a muted version of the experience it promises.

Toronto-based artist/OCADU Alumnus Alex McLeod presents two short, computer generated films. In SISYPHUS, a rock undulates uncannily along a rocky landscape, suggesting sentience or puppetry by an unseen force. In ALMOST HOME, a metallic structure navigates a grassy lawn. Both films use strange, futuristic forms to play with familiarity and discomfort.

In Corridor, artist/OCADU Alumna Alex Beriault choreographs a performance that inserts two people within a sculptural hallway that extends into the lake. The two performers take turns pushing each other into the walls of the floating corridor, testing their delicate relationships to each other and the structure.

Internationally-exhibited Toronto-based artist/OCADU Alumna Faye Mullen’s work is a site-specific performance which takes place nightly at sunset for the Breaker, a breakwater at the north west-most point of Ontario Place’s West Island. Exploring the failure implicit in language, Mullen turns to alternate signals which use movement and ritual to suggest new modes of communication and connection reviving archaic gestures. Performed at the edge of the lake this work addresses the moment a walk, collective or individual, becomes a cry. Mullen’s poetic encounter symbolically gathers the breakwater, the horizon, the body to respond to the sea and sky as sites of knowledge and grounds upon which one can be heard.

OCADU Alumna Hazel Meyer is an interdisciplinary artist who works with installation, performance, and textiles to investigate the relationships between sport, sexuality, feminism, and material culture. Her work aims to recover the queer aesthetics, politics, and bodies often effaced within histories of sports and recreation. Drawing on archival research, she designs immersive installations that bring various troublemakers—lesbians-feminists, gender outlaws, leather-dykes—into the performative spaces of athletics. Recent projects include a solo exhibition at MacLaren Art Centre (Barrie) and a public art commission for Cambridge Gallery’s Idea Exchange. In 2015 she was Scrap Metal Gallery’s (Toronto) inaugural artist in residence, where she produced a large-scale installation and public performance based on her ongoing project Muscle Panic (2014– ). She is currently at work on an iteration of Muscle Panic for the CAG in Vancouver. As part of her ongoing collaboration with Cait McKinney on the history of tools within queer social movements, she is developing Tape Condition: degraded, an exhibition and series of public programs at the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (2016, Toronto). Hazel holds an MFA from OCAD University (Toronto) and a BFA from Concordia University (Montréal).

Faculty of Art faculty Jennie Suddick and Cole Swanson’s Kuckucksuhr is an architectural intervention that transforms the watchtower of Ontario Place’s Wilderness Adventure log ride into a cuckoo clock. Using seeds and light to beckon migratory bird species to the installation, Suddick and Swanson reimagine the passage of time in natural terms—rather than a robotic cuckoo, the migratory species that move through and feed off the structure come to represent hourly cycles. Conceived as a critique of human conceptions of progress, Kuckucksuhr questions the human-made nature-scape of Ontario Place, reflecting on the desire to control, tame, and represent nature. Re-signifying the watchtower as a space of natural transition and reclamation, Kuckucksuhr creates an opportunity for complex natural patterns of life to surface in an otherwise artificial environment.

Faculty of Art faculty Luke Painter presents two works, a drawing in the Atom Blaster Pavilion and an animation in Cinesphere.
In Luke Painter’s 3D animation, The Teasers and the Tormentors, 20th century set design from theatre, film, and illusion shows take centre stage. Fascinated by video’s capacity to create illusions, Painter uses virtual mirrors to reveal the action outside of the camera to the viewer, creating the sense that a rich, complex environment exists beyond the set.
In his drawing, Crystal Palace Warehouse, Painter references the cast-iron and plate-glass building originally erected in Hyde Park, London, England, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Painter re-envisions the Crystal Palace with its transparent walls and skeletal structure as a ghostly apparition that pays homage to the architect’s small-greenhouse-made-big. Painter populates the inside of the building with images of 3D models of plants and trees that he finds online at Google 3D Warehouse and other 3D model reference websites. While Painter represents the Crystal Palace as a bygone spirit in and of itself, the virtual properties of the plants in his work also possess an uncanny element of immateriality.

OCADU Studio Manager Nick Hooper and Lauren Schaffer present Shohola Nights.  Modernity can in part be defined by the disappearance of wilderness from Western world-view, and by the ever-evolving distinction between the natural and the artificial. We now are more apt to think of the two as intertwined and co-dependent systems. Some scientists contend that we have entered a new geologic era - the Anthropocene - marked by the impact of human activity on earth’s ecosystems. With these current conditions in mind, Shohola Nights reflects the shifts in our understanding and representations of the world and our place in it.  Set against the backdrop of night, Shohola Nights is an experimental representation of landscape that is notable for its use of light and sound. At times emblazoned upon the landscape and at other times fugitively cast, the various sources of light illuminate or obfuscate minute detail, while the enveloping sound conveys the ever-churning progress of life on the planet.

Known for his RGB light installations, artist/Faculty of Art faculty Philippe Blanchard plays with the interaction of coloured light and coloured pigment in his “expanded animation” for in/Future: New Troglodytes II. Borrowing from the forms of naturally-made caves (such as stalactites and stalagmites), Blanchard’s RGB cave environment uses soft and stretched textile forms to craft a cave brimming with visual stimuli in a space formerly home to an amusement park ride. Interested in fire as a prehistoric form of visual technology, Blanchard plays with the magic of light and shadow, and their potential for creating the illusion of moving images. Though informed heavily by the digital, New Troglodytes II reflects on the ancient power of visual storytelling, embodying the simultaneous presence of past and future.

Inspired by the ice silo in what was once the “Wild World of Weather” exhibition at Ontario Places, multi-disciplinary artists/Faculty of Art faculty Simone Jones & Laura Millard use drawing, sound, and installation to explore circularity and motion. In Recursive Traces, a looped and fragmented recording of Philip Glass’s Étude #1 by Simone Jones mirrors the roundness of the silo. With sound cycling and returning as visitors descend the spiral stairs, circularity is built into the foundation of the installation. Discarded fragments of styrofoam icebergs are illuminated by lightboxes containing images of Laura Millard’s drawings made by snowmobiles etching patterns onto the icy surface of a frozen lake. At every turn, the artists reflect on the cyclicality of weather, time, and our emotional, physical, and perceptual movements. 

Faculty of Art faculty Wrik Mead’s film, A Place to Stand, addresses and contrasts the state of LGBTQ rights around the globe in two eras: 1971 (the year that Ontario Place opened) and 2016. Making use of a dizzying array of anti-gay protest footage captured and posted on the internet, Mead’s protagonist bears witness to the fractures, shifts, improvements and resistances that have brought us to this time in LGBTQ history.

 

PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS FOR THE CLOSING WEEKEND OF THE FESTIVAL INCLUDE:

in/future/communities - FREE Lecture Series presented by Waterfront Toronto - Sunday September 25th
Reserve your ticket at: https://infuturetalks.eventbrite.ca

Hosted by Waterfront Toronto’s CEO William Fleissig, this series of talks will challenge culture-makers and urbanists to reimagine what it means to be a city builder. On the closing afternoon of the in/future festival, we’ll gather leading voices who will present radical new ideas for building future communities.

Introduction by: Eb Zeidler (Zeidler Partnership Architects) and Margie Zeidler (Urbanspace Property Group) discuss the utopian design of leisure spaces like Ontario Place and shared work spaces like 401 Richmond, and how both projects have changed the face of our City in the past 40 years.

Talks by: Vass Bednar (Martin Prosperity Institute) discusses the problem with the term community and its implications for governance and policy-making.
Lisa Tziona Switkin (James Corner Field Operations) discusses creating a new ecological aesthetic that envisions new forms of urban nature that are transformative, performative and showcase both natural and engineered beauty.
Karen Carter (Myseum of Toronto) discusses embracing the unknown as a revolutionary stance for knitting together a collective identity for an increasingly diverse city.
Susan Blight (Ogimaa Mikana) discusses the City of Toronto as a utopian experiment to restore Indigeneity, build solidarities, and decolonize our cities.
Katerina Cizek (MIT Open Documentary Lab) on the city as open web and on becoming urban citizens rather than consumers.

North of Superior on IMAX - Sunday September 25th
Join us for a rare opportunity to watch North of Superior, the first ever IMAX film screened in Cinesphere, the world’s first permanent IMAX theatre. This film will be screened as part of our closing night program, paired with contemporary video works and followed by a very special Q&A with Graeme Ferguson himself, the director of North of Superior and one of the founders of IMAX.

Lectures at the end of the World(s) - by Onsite Gallery at OCADU -
September 24th & 25th
Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., from September 17 to 25. Onsite Gallery presents a four-part speaker series that asks us to consider what is worth discussing, sharing and exploring in a post-apocalyptic state. Speakers include Gabriel Allahua (Lecture: Post-Capitalism World(s), Saturday, September 24) and Rouzbeh Akhbari (Lecture: Post-Anthropocene World(s), Sunday, September 25).

Cinesphere presented by Air France:
Opened in 1971, and built by renowned architect Eb Zeidler, as the first permanent IMAX theatre in the world, the iconic Cinesphere will come to life once again to showcase a daily changing schedule of 44 contemporary film & video works, and live audio/visual performances. Don’t miss a rare opportunity to see six original IMAX films from the 70s and 80's - such as the renowned Labyrinth and Man Belongs to Earth - most of which haven't been screened for the public in over 30 years.

Small World Music Stage presented by Exodus Travels:
For its 15th edition, the Small World Music Festival is proud to be part of in/future. Showcasing the best sounds from around the world and around the corner, Small World celebrates the cultural diversity of Ontario with artists who combine tradition with a view to the future. And they bring the party to a venue with a rich musical history! Check the schedule for the amazing roster of musicians playing daily.

 

 

Venue & Address: 
Ontario Place on the West Island at 955 Lake Shore Blvd West. The entrance is located at Ontario Drive and Lakeshore. Parking can be found at Remembrance Drive and Lakeshore. Saturdays: Gates open at 12pm, Gates close at 11pm Sundays: Gates open at 12pm, Gates close at 10pm Mon-Fri: Gates open at 5pm, Gates close at 11pm
Website: 
http://www.infuture.ca/

Alexandre Arrechea Student Workshop

Alexandre Arrechea
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

Join us for a small, intimate student workshop with renowned Cuban artist, Alexandre Arrechea, on Thursday, September 29 at 3pm.

Thought provoking artist Alexandre Arrechea will visit OCAD U the last week of September and deliver his lecture CORNERS, where he will introduce sculpture within the context of the public environment. Dialogue strategies will be explored in his talk, as will issues such as the evolution of site-specific sculpture, the related realm of collaboration, and the future of public artwork.

The artist has kindly agreed to give a two hour workshop with a small group of students – limited to only 25 attendees – the day following the lecture. For OCAD University students or alumni only.

If you are interested in attending, please email jnorthwayfrank@ocadu.ca to secure your spot, as capacity is limited.

Lecture
Wednesday, September 28, 7pm
100 McCaul Street - Room 190 (Auditorium)

Small Student Workshop
Thursday, September 29, 3pm
100 McCaul Street – Room 258

About Alexandre Arrechea:

Alexandre Arrechea (b. 1970, Trinidad, Cuba) lives and works in New York City. His practice employs visual metaphors to address ongoing social themes of inequality, cultural disenfranchisement and the disputed position of art in a global, media-driven society. Arrechea was a founding member (1991–2003) of the Cuban artist collective Los Carpinteros. Since returning to individual practice, he has focused on large-scale sculptures and installations that he first drafts in watercolour and that question the interconnectedness of urban design with systems of power and surveillance. His works include installation and painting as well as the use of what he considers are objects with “elements of truth.” This last category has included found “remnants” of places such as debris, fragments of walls and measuring tape. He is best known for monumental projects such as NOLIMITS (2013), comprising ten sculptures on New York City’s Park Avenue, each of which riffs on an iconic city building.

Arrechea received a BFA from Havana’s Instituto Superior de Arte in 1994. In 2015 during the 12th Bienal de Havana, he received the Artist of the Year Award from the Howard and Patricia Farber Foundation. The following year, the Palm Springs’ Coachella Music Festival commissioned his Katrina Chairs to commemorate the 2005 Gulf Coast hurricane. Arrechea has held solo exhibitions at institutions such as Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana, PS1 Contemporary Art Center in New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) in Los Angeles, and the New Museum in New York.

http://alexandrearrechea.com

Alexandre Arrechea appears courtesy of Latin American Canadian Art Projects and OCAD University's President's Speaker Series.
Photo: Rafael Garcia Sanchez

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street - Room 258
Email: 
jnorthwayfrank@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x300
Cost: 
Free

Alexandre Arrechea - CORNERS

Portrait of Alexandre Arrechea
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 11:00pm to Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 12:30am

Join us at OCAD University to hear a talk by the renowned and thought-provoking speaker Alexandre Arrechea, a Cuban artist whose work involves concepts of power and its network of hierarchies, surveillance, control, prohibitions, and subjection. With his lecture Corners, Arrechea introduces sculpture within the context of the public environment. Dialogue strategies will be explored in the talk, as will issues such as the evolution of site-specific sculpture, the related realm of collaboration, and the future of public artwork.

Presented in association with the lecture is also an intimate student workshop on Thursday, September 29 at 3pm.

Lecture
Wednesday, September 28, 7pm
100 McCaul Street - Room 190 (Auditorium)

Small Student Workshop
Thursday, September 29, 3pm
100 McCaul Street – Room 258

About the Artist

Alexandre Arrechea (b. 1970, Trinidad, Cuba) lives and works in New York City. Arrechea received a BFA from Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA), Havana, Cuba in 1994. As a founding member (from 1991 through 2003) of the Cuban artist collective Los Carpinteros, his work employs visual metaphors for ongoing social themes of inequality, cultural disenfranchisement, and the disputed position of art in a global, media driven society.

Since returning to his individual practice, he focuses on large-scale sculptures and installations that interrogate the interconnectedness of urban design with systems of power and surveillance, first drafted in watercolors. His practice includes installation, painting, and the use of what he considers are objects with “elements of truth”; this last category has included found remnants of places, like debris, fragments of walls, and measuring tape. He is best known for monumental projects like NOLIMITS (2013), the ten sculptures on Park Avenue are riffs on iconic NYC buildings that twists and bends with the source of inspiration as though it were a malleable garden hose. Suffused  with humor and levity which reveal the powerful potential of artistic intervention to shock us out of our blasé of acceptance of everyday submission. In 2015, he won Artist of the Year Award by the Howard and Patricia Farber Foundation in Havana during the 12th Bienal de Havana. In 2016, Coachella Music Festival in Palm Springs, CA commissioned Arrechea and made Katrina Chair elevates the community around the Katrina Hurricane that in 2005 slammed the U.S. Gulf Coast with winds of up to 127 miles per hour. Arrechea has had individual exhibitions at institutions such as Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana; PS1 Contemporary Art Center in New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) in Los Angeles; and the New Museum in New York.

http://alexandrearrechea.com

Presented by Latin American Canadian Art Projects in partnership with OCAD University's President's Speaker Series
Photo by Rafael Garcia Sanchez.

 

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street - Auditorium - (Room 190)
Email: 
jnorthwayfrank@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x300
Cost: 
Free

New Public Artwork by IAMD Graduate Student David Constantino Salazar to be Unveiled

poster of public unveiling of One & All
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 4:00am

Second year IAMD graduate student David Constantino Salazar will have his new public art commission, One & All, unveiled on Thursday, September 22 at 10:00am. This work was commissioned by First Capital Realty in Collaboration with Julie M. Gallery and OCAD University and is installed in Halton Hills Village (361-375 Mountainview Road South) in Georgetown, Ontario.

For more information on David’s work please visit: http://www.projectsalazar.com/

More about the IAMD program: http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/graduate-studies/interdisciplinary-masters-in-art-media-and-design.htm

Gary Taxali's "brain" unveiled

Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 1:30pm

http://www.torontosun.com/2016/04/25/brain-project-brings-sculptures-and-awareness-to-toronto

 

Baycrest Health Sciences is bringing together the best minds in the arts to support the top brains in science in an effort designed to put the spotlight on aging and brain health.

The Brain Project has attracted 100 artists who have created brain sculptures that will be on display across Toronto, starting June 3

Street-level art: Hadley+Maxwell on icons, time and sculpting for the public sphere

Hadley Howes and Maxwell Stephens — professionally known as the dynamic artist duo Hadley+Maxwell—live in Berlin, Germany, and exhibit their integrative, 3D work all over the world. In early spring 2016, they delivered an artist talk at OCAD University, where their thoughts on employing diverse media to rework iconic images and traditional forms galvanized my interest. That first encounter with Hadley+Maxwell’s energetic blending of pop culture, politics, history and aesthetics left me craving more.

Most recently, Hadley+Maxwell have ventured into the public domain with their latest project Garden of Future Follies. This major public art commission is installed along Toronto’s waterfront (Front St. E. and Bayview Ave., North-West corner)

Hadley Howes casting To Serve and Protect
Hadley Howes casting To Serve and Protect
Photo by: Cristina Saban

The Garden of Future Follies is “based on the idea of the fanciful gardens and landscape ornaments of 18th- and 19th-century France and England,” explain Hadley+Maxwell. In this project, the artists deploy their signature Cinefoil process, which entails pressing a thick aluminum-foil material against an object to take its shape.

The overarching goal of the Garden of Future Follies is to bring aspects of public works down to street level. In this way, audiences can engage with past histories and reconfigure “reified ideologies” expressed within public works to present a new way of thinking and living.

Hadley+Maxwell and artist assistant Alex Achtem casting the iconic fireplace at Osgoode Hall Library
Hadley+Maxwell and artist assistant Alex Achtem casting the iconic fireplace at Osgoode Hall Library
Photo by: Sara Malabar

Individually titled Modern, Memorial, Atlas, Caryatid, Gargoyle, Threshold and Monument, each piece of their installation serves as a physical remix or mash-up of what has come before, and presents itself as the new ideal, not only within the art world but within Toronto’s larger social and cultural makeup. Expected to be completed in May 2016, the 190 aluminum impressions are currently in their final stages of being cast in bronze, polished, treated with patina and fitted with posts for installation. 

Recently, I drove out to Artcast — a premiere art foundry in Georgetown — to see how Hadley+Maxwell’s project is progressing and to gain more insight into how these artists shifted their thinking in order to create for the public sphere. Here is part of our conversation.

Time and space

Jill Price (JP): Up until this project you have been working within the gallery system. What have you had to think about differently while creating an installation that many people will interact with each day?


Hadley Howes (HH): We learned that we were more nervous than what is warranted. We expected many more restrictions. Time also became a bigger concept: regardless of the work now being constructed in bronze, the question arises, what does permanence really mean? Deterioration is still a time-based process; we are just dealing with a different variation of longevity in this case.


Maxwell Stephens (MS): Even the process became an organic research project about what is a successful public art project. We had to consider engineering and aesthetics simultaneously, safety, sharp edges, pinching, etc. We also needed to think how the context around the work might change.

Interpretation and aesthetics

JP:  Did you have mentors that you could turn to during this process?
HH: We approached and looked to creative people who have had experience working on this scale and in this realm. Dan Young, Ed Pien, Antonia Hirsch, Liz Magor and Fast Worms are all artists who we looked to for their sense of play. We also looked at the work of architects such as Carson Chan and Alex Schwader (a New York architect who has become an artist and has translated his practice from interior to public spaces).
MS: Historically, we also looked to great old-school public art by artists such as Picasso, Jean DuBuffet and Alexander Calder. They all considered surface versus interior; abstraction; adaptation; the difference between back and front; and the aesthetics and politics of collage.

Hadley+Maxwell contemplating the addition of a lion door knocker to balance the columns of Gargoyle
Hadley+Maxwell contemplating the addition of a lion door knocker to balance the columns of Gargoyle
Photo by: Jill Price

Public-sphere art

JP: Have there been benefits to working with extra parameters or expectations?
HH:  Overcoming or working on the temptation to be swayed by public opinion has demanded a lot of personal growth. When we realized there would be an overwhelming expression of public opinion, I had to ensure that I became very centred, developed a real conviction about our work and did not give in to the ego stroking or breaking that can happen when exposed to the public sphere.
MS: I have been excited to be able to make this work and take up the challenge to make for a broader public who are incredibly intelligent. The project has also served as a natural extension of our past projects, and has helped us continue our learning process as artists. Additionally, we became very excited when we saw some real opportunities for additional process or abstraction at the wax stage of the mould-making process.

Material language

JP: Do the two of you ever arrive at an impasse and, if so, what strategies do you use to move through those moments?
HH: Pouting! (LOL) We typically put everything on the table—historical context, constant questioning. If we are butting heads, it may be because we aren’t listening to the material and its history.
MS: We do take informal timeouts, but often the last word goes to the third element, the material. We share a respect for the material we are working with, whether it is the language of a poster or the aura of bronze.

Interpretation, interaction, integration

JP: Knowing that your works will be venerable, what do you worry about most? 
HH: I think my greatest fears are indifference, static interpretation, no interaction, no questioning.
MS: I find all forms of interaction exciting! I can’t wait to see how they will become integrated into the community and how they will be utilized or altered in different ways.

Advice for new public-commission artists

JP: What would be one piece of advice you would offer to artists who want to venture into the world of public art commissions?
HH: Do not think that you can do it on your own. Budget for help in your proposal. Also, immerse yourself in your making! We don’t really value traditional research methods, but we learned more than we ever expected simply through direct interaction with the sculptures.
MS: Yes, throw yourself into the material process and the ideas and meaning will follow. We had more people come up and teach us about what we were working with than we could have ever imagined. 

 

 

See more of Hadley + Maxwell’s work online, and follow the Garden of Future Follies on Facebook.

 

Jill Price is the curator and education officer at Quest Art in Midland, Ontario. She is currently a student in OCAD U’s Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design (IAMD) MFA program.

Author: 
Jill Price
Template: 
Standard Template
Department: 

Faculty member Gary Taxali launches The Brain Project

Image of Gary Taxali standing next to a model of a brain
Monday, April 25, 2016 - 4:00am

At an event at City Hall on April 25th, Toronto mayor John Tory unveiled a striking work of art: a brain-shaped sculpture customized by the unmistakable art of illustrator, artist and associate professor Gary Taxali. Taxali is one of 100 artists, designers, architects and celebrities who have been recruited to turn models of brains into unique works of art.

The Brain Project is juried by a team of curators who will choose the designs to be exhibited publicly this summer. The works will be installed at key outdoor spots in the city such as Nathan Phillips Square, MaRS Discovery District and OCAD University.

The public will have the opportunity to vote on the top five works, and at the end of the exhibition, the customized sculptures will be auctioned off with proceeds going to support care and research into Alzheimer’s and age-related dementia at Baycrest Health Sciences.

Confirmed participants include Harold Feist, Jill Greenberg, Robert Marchessault, Karim Rashid and Janna Watson, with more to be announced in the weeks to come. Matthew Bellamy of Muse, Kim Kardashian West and daughter North West are among the celebrities also taking part in the creative fundraising campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Course: Landmarks: Art + Places (April 26)

New Course
Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Be part of a groundbreaking public art project that will reimagine Canada in 2017

New Course from the Faculty of Art
Open to Majors and Thesis Students entering fourth-year of study in 2016-17

CROS-S4001 Landmarks: Art + Places brings together educational institutions, curators, artists and students from across the country to engage in a multi-faceted dialogue about Canada resulting in the installation of public artworks in Parks Canada sites and in an online platform. Responding to the themes of five national curators, students will engage with diverse issues such as: concepts of nature, post-colonial issues of nationhood, narratives of identity, community and citizenship, ontologies of landscape and public parks as socio-cultural spaces of collective memory and expressions of power. Drawing upon Indigenous epistemologies that consider, respect and map land acknowledgements, various methodologies will be employed. You can take this course in lieu of your thesis or as an elective. 

When: Starting Winter 2017
Credit Value: 1.0 credit
Instructors: Laura Millard and Min Sook Lee
Registration: By application (for more information email lmillard@faculty.ocadu.ca / minsooklee@faculty.ocadu.ca or attend one of the information sessions below)

Prerequisites one of: CRCP 4002, HUMN 3017, VISA 3023, VISA 4009, VISA 4022, VISM 4010, CRCP 3002, CROS 4006, DIGF 3001, ENVR 3003 or CROS 3001 and 14.0 credits, including all first-year and second-year requirements and/or permission from the instructor.

Information Sessions:
Thursday, April 14, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Tuesday, April 19, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Tuesday, April 26, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)

Venue & Address: 
230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Email: 
lmillard@faculty.ocadu.ca; minsooklee@faculty.ocadu.ca

New Course: Landmarks: Art + Places (April 19)

New Course
Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Be part of a groundbreaking public art project that will reimagine Canada in 2017

New Course from the Faculty of Art
Open to Majors and Thesis Students entering fourth-year of study in 2016-17

CROS-S4001 Landmarks: Art + Places brings together educational institutions, curators, artists and students from across the country to engage in a multi-faceted dialogue about Canada resulting in the installation of public artworks in Parks Canada sites and in an online platform. Responding to the themes of five national curators, students will engage with diverse issues such as: concepts of nature, post-colonial issues of nationhood, narratives of identity, community and citizenship, ontologies of landscape and public parks as socio-cultural spaces of collective memory and expressions of power. Drawing upon Indigenous epistemologies that consider, respect and map land acknowledgements, various methodologies will be employed. You can take this course in lieu of your thesis or as an elective. 

When: Starting Winter 2017
Credit Value: 1.0 credit
Instructors: Laura Millard and Min Sook Lee
Registration: By application (for more information email lmillard@faculty.ocadu.ca / minsooklee@faculty.ocadu.ca or attend one of the information sessions below)

Prerequisites one of: CRCP 4002, HUMN 3017, VISA 3023, VISA 4009, VISA 4022, VISM 4010, CRCP 3002, CROS 4006, DIGF 3001, ENVR 3003 or CROS 3001 and 14.0 credits, including all first-year and second-year requirements and/or permission from the instructor.

Information Sessions:
Thursday, April 14, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Tuesday, April 19, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Tuesday, April 26, 3 p.m., 230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)

Venue & Address: 
230 Richmond Street West, Room 322 (third floor)
Email: 
lmillard@faculty.ocadu.ca; minsooklee@faculty.ocadu.ca

Pages