RESEARCH RENDEZVOUS

Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

Emma Westecott: Critical Game Making

Digital games are an increasingly significant contemporary critical form in which makers express models of gameplay that make meaning beyond the context of pure entertainment. Game culture is pervasive and amidst a wider technological context that invites all our active participation provides one setting for the rise in creative expression evident across digital existence.

Starting from a feminist perspective situated in an art and design university, this talk explores a set of lenses to approach critical making practices in games. The hope is that the approaches discussed may offer frameworks applicable across the digital diaspora.

Angelika Seeschaaf Veres + Greg Sims: 3D Design – Digital and Material Interplay

This research explores current and future implications of 3D digital technologies in design processes as it redefines our relation to objects, experiences and environments. Product Designer Angelika Seeschaaf Veres and Jewellery Designer Greg Sims bring their unique perspectives on this topic by elaborating on the potential within the liminal space of the digital and the material. The research discourse will map new cultural and social trajectories considering: Usercentred design & product customization, digital fluency and meaningful making.

 

Venue & Address: 
205 RICHMOND ST. W. | Room 701K | DF SALON
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/research
Email: 
research@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
FREE
Research Rendezvous March 24th Poster

Research Rendezvous

Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm

On Thursday, February 25th 12:00 pm-1:30 pm the Research Office will be hosting a Research Rendezvous in the DF Salon (Room 701K, 205 Richmond) with the following faculty members who will be presenting their research:

Robert Diaz, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Anti-Japanese Nationalisms, Filipina Victimhood, and the Limits of Reparation

Sarah Tranum, Faculty of Design

Designing Sustainable Clean Water Solutions Using Women’s Livelihood Generation and Empowerment Strategies

Robert Diaz is an Assistant Professor in the Faculties of Liberal Arts & Sciences and Graduate Studies at OCAD University. His teaching and scholarship focus on the intersections of Sexuality, Filipino, Asian, and Postcolonial Studies. Diaz is currently co-editing Diasporic Intimacies: Queer Filipinos/as and Canadian Imaginaries (under contract with Northwestern University Press), which brings together artists, scholars, and community workers in order to examine the contributions of queer Filipinos/as to Canadian culture and society.

In this talk, Robert Diaz tracks the emergence of two important figures that have come to signify anti-Japanese nationalisms and calls for reparations in the Philippines from the 1990’s onwards, the comfort woman (or women systematically abducted during Japanese occupation) and the japayuki (or women bound for Japan as migrant laborers because of the economic relationship between the Philippines and Japan). By examining the representation of these figures in two provocative cinematic works—Nick DeOcampo’s The Sex Warriors and The Samurai and Gil Portes’ film Markova Comfort Gay—Diaz suggests that Filipino artists have queered the figure of the victimized Filipina in order to expose how anti-Japanese nationalisms reproduce patriarchal assumptions about female victimhood. By queering the comfort woman and the japayuki, these films instead challenge dominant notions of reparation by dramatizing how histories of Japanese colonialism and Japanese capitalist expansion intersect.

Sarah Tranum is an Assistant Professor, Tenure-Track, in Social Innovation Design. As part of TrickleUp Design, Sarah is leading a Canadian-government funding research project based in India. The goal of the project is to work in slum communities to develop a product that provides clean water and can be manufactured locally. Sarah is also working on a sustainably designed and produced consumer product targeting the North American market.

Sarah will use her research project based in South Goa, India, called CleanCube, as the backbone of this discussion to discuss how sustainable clean water solutions can be designed by leveraging income generation and women’s empowerment activities. CleanCube employs these strategies in pilot communities where the need for clean water and improved sanitation goes hand in hand with a lack of economic and social enfranchisement opportunities, especially among women.

Please join us for this exciting session!

Venue & Address: 
DF Salon (Room 701K, 205 Richmond)
Cost: 
Free
Research rendezvous Poster with event info

Research Rendezvous: Lynne Heller, Judith Doyle, and research team

Research Rendezvous Logo. Abstract line drawing of two faces coming together to form a lightbulb.
Monday, January 18, 2016 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

The team of Lynne Heller, Judith Doyle, Nina Czegledy, Robin Len, Anna Lew, Martin Shook, Lynn Hughes, and Gina Haraszti will be presenting Dobble Debate- a research project which creatively uses humor and imagination to look at people’s differing abilities.

Venue & Address: 
Room 701K, 205 Richmond St. W
Email: 
mgolberg@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
FREE
Research Rendezvous poster with event info

Research Rendezvous Presents Alia Weston and Kate Sellen

Research Rendezvous Poster
Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Research Rendezvous is a monthly lunchtime series for faculty and students to share and learn about research at OCAD U.

ALIA WESTON
Activating [Social] Entrepreneurship

This project investigated the ways in which [social] entrepreneurship can be developed
in a post-crisis economy. In Zimbabwe, the decade-long economic crisis — 1999-2009 —has led to a drain of skills and resources. Youth have few opportunities to gain support for [social] entrepreneurial endeavors. This project employed action research as a way of understanding needs and providing support. The research was facilitated in conjunction with a Zimbabwean social enterprise Mu’unze which collaborates with artisans.

Dr. Alia Weston is an Assistant Professor, Creative and Business Enterprise, and a director of the Impact Economy Research Hub (IERH). The IERH is the research division of the Impact Collective: OCADU’s Art & Design Social Innovation Hub.

KATE SELLEN
What can we learn from a socio-technical study of the implementation experience of a technology for blood issuing in the high-risk setting of the operating suite?
This talk will explore the results of a three-year multi-site study of electronic remote blood issue and the implications for design in clinical contexts. Some of the topics for discussion will include the relevance of adaptation, learning and workarounds, critical incidents and error recovery, and the dynamics of transactional processes for desing. This research also highlights the value of
a multi-site socio-technical approach for revealing a diversity of experience that point towards actionable recommendations for the design of tools to support highly dynamic clinical work.

Kate Sellen is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Design at OCADU working on interaction design and innovation in healthcare. She leads the Healthcare and Resilient Experience Research Group and the Envision Health group at OCAD U.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street | Room 187
Cost: 
Free

Research Rendezvous

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How are you OCAD U?
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Monday, May 11, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

The Office of Research Services will be hosting a Research Rendezvous with research presentations by the following two faculty members:

Peter Coppin, Faculty of Design
"What is Lost in Translation from Visual Graphics to Text for Accessibility (with implications for the picture perception debate and the graphic-linguistic distinction)"

Pam Patterson, Faculty of Art, with OCAD U Art & Design Education student Meaghan Barry
"How Are U OCAD U?"

Please join us for this one-hour session and feel free to bring your lunch!

Dr. Peter Coppin is an Assistant Professor of Design at OCAD University. He is a core Program Faculty member in the Master of Design (MDes) in Inclusive Design program. During his PhD, Peter developed a perceptual-cognitive model for understanding how graphics afford actions, a theme that cuts across inclusive design, human-computer interface design, visual art-design, and learning technology research. Prior to this, Peter developed ‘remote experience’ systems that delivered data from remote rovers operating in extreme environments to science teams and the general public as Principal Investigator and Director of the NASA funded EventScope Project at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). At CMU Peter also directed the BigSignal Project, one of the first telescience interfaces for educational audiences. Prior to BigSignal, Peter was a nationally and internationally exhibiting electronic media artist and designer, operating under the group alias ‘Centre for Metahuman Exploration.’ He developed telerobotic works and interactive television shows that were exhibited in venues such as the Ars Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria; MIR: Art in Space in Bolzono, Italy; and the SIGGRAPH Touchware Exhibition in Orlando, Florida. Peter also directed projects for EventScope’s commercial spin-off, resulting in patented technologies to solve problems for various NASA and university customers. Peter taught human centered art and technology project classes such as ‘Telepresence Art and Applications,’ within multiple departments at Carnegie Mellon.

"What is Lost in Translation from Visual Graphics to Text for Accessibility (with implications for the picture perception debate and the graphic-linguistic distinction)"
In this presentation, Peter will describe the progress toward translating ‘visual’ graphics into non-visual perceptual modes such as sound to produce more accessible interfaces. Additionally, he will demonstrate how our design is guided by a provisional model that treats the visual cortex as a spatial cortex that is recruited by sight, sound and touch (cf. Knauff, 2013). The problem: According to WCAG guidelines, a ‘visual’ graphic (i.e., a picture) is considered ‘accessible’ (e.g., to low-vision and/or blind users) if it has been ‘translated’ into a text description (Caldwell, et al., 2008). However, if an author’s intention could be conveyed via text, then why did they create a (visual) graphic? One often cited advantage is that “the eye and the visual cortex of the brain form a massively parallel processor that provides the highest-bandwidth channel into human cognitive centers” (Ware, 2012). In contrast, a screen reader sequentially reads through text descriptions. However, are these advantages only possible though visuals? Sonic interfaces are routinely used for sense making: Doppler ultrasound conveys anatomical structures via audible frequencies and researchers have converted video signals into sound to enable blind audiences to navigate outdoors and to recognize faces (e.g., Levy-Tzedek et al., 2012). Spatial structure seems to transcend the visual: It can be conveyed via sound (e.g., when we hear an echo) or touch. In addition to demonstrating how this provisional model can guide interface design, Peter will also propose how it relates to, and in some cases can help reconcile, classic debates about the ‘unlearned’ (e.g., Gibson, 1978; Kennedy, 1974) versus ‘learned’ (e.g., Goodman, 1976) properties of picture perception between art theory and perceptual psychology and the related graphic-linguistic distinction (Shimojima, 1999).

Dr. Pam Patterson has been active for over 30 years in the arts, academic and women’s communities. Her performances, research, teaching, and curatorial projects focus on embodiment and performativity in art practice, women’s, gender and disability issues, critical pedagogy and art(s) education. She founded an arts-informed feminist research, presentation, and publication program, WIAprojects (www.wiaprojects.com) at the Centre for Women's Studies in Education at OISE/ University of Toronto in 2004 and has been Director of the program since. As a performance and visual artist, she was a founding member of FADO Performance and ARTIFACTS and continues to exhibit and perform internationally. She currently teaches in the Faculty of Art at the Ontario College of Art & Design University. At OCAD U, she has facilitated a number of cross-disciplinary, cross-institutional projects including Food=Need OCAD U. ARTISTS TEACHING ARTISTS, and this recent HOW ARE U OCAD U? As Director, Research for the Canadian Society for Education through Art (CSEA) she is currently co-facilitating national research initiatives groups with CSEA President, Peter Vietgen (Brock University).

"How Are U OCAD U?"
Art and Design Education Lab - Community Leadership mounted a campaign fall 2014 term inviting the OCAD U community to assist them in re-imagining OCAD U for the 21st C. This action was an outgrowth of our deep curiosity about our own complicity in teaching and learning at OCAD U. We wanted to open the Pandora’s Box and excavate the messiness. We all know that we need to dig deep and take risks in studio practice in order to push our work to stronger and richer iterations. But, how can we as educators do the same? How can we define OCAD U as a community: Is it a place of/for community gathering(s)? What is its ethical grounding? What is its reason for being? How can we determine what learning means at OCAD? While our posters are presented as tongue-and-cheek, the data they were derived from was diverse, compelling, and often contradictory. Videos, which accompany this exhibition, provide a more storied response from OCAD U community members. Our devised terms for examination for the survey and Learning Zone (LZ) display are below. Demographics from LZ are also listed. Special thanks to the OCADSU for additional data from their own survey.
Six Terms for Examination:

1. How have you achieved a sense of community at OCAD U?
2. How has your learning experience been? How can it better prepare you for the working world?
3. What teaching methods are you looking for? What teaching methods are actually working for you?
4. How have OCAD U community initiatives improved your experience?
5. How does your experience match your expectations?
6. What have you achieved as a student or faculty or staff at OCAD U?
Survey monkey site: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RDW5SDG

Venue & Address: 
Lambert Lounge (Room 187, 100 McCaul)
Cost: 
Free

Research Rendezvous

Ut pictura poesis multi-view galaxy
Brain screen capture
Friday, April 17, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Research Rendezvous is a monthly lunchtime series for faculty and students to share and learn about research at OCAD U. Come share your ideas, connect with potential collaborators and find out how you can get involved in research.

This month's featured presenters:

David Griffin, Faculty of Art
"Ut Pictura Poesis: Drawing into Space"

In 1735, Leonard Euler presented a solution to the practical problem of whether a route could be plotted to cross each of seven bridges in Königsberg once. His negative solution used the simplest of mark-making strategies to resolve a conceptual problem. Euler did not actually cross the town’s bridges, but used them to resolve questions of connectivity, after which diagrammatic representations can be seen as the restructuring of logical problems to allow for inductive reasoning, for fruitful application beyond theory. But what if such a working graphic has as its target something that is simply incomprehensible? What are the upper limits of the denotational logic of such diagrams?

Michael Page, Faculty of Art
"Three-Dimensional Medical and Scientific Data Viewed in Digital Holographic Form"
The majority of medical and scientific imaging recorded today is 3 dimensional. MRI, CAT scan, PET scan and confocal microscopy are 3D images that are typically viewed in 2D, often as slices or scallops.
OCAD’s PHASE Lab recently received funding from NSERC to research methods of imaging electrical activity (EEG) in the human brain using digital holographic techniques. This project was highly successful and has drawn the attention of the medical community at MARS and Princess Margaret Hospital.
Prof. Michael Page will be showing holograms (created from electrical scans of his own brain), as well as examples of 3D visualization that will soon be rendered holographically.
These holographic images of patient data will bring new knowledge to physicians, surgeons, radiologists and other medical workers. Understanding complex data sets better will save lives.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street, Room 187
Cost: 
Free

Research Rendezvous

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Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Presenter 1: Martha Ladly, Faculty of Design

Bio: Dr. Martha Ladly is a Professor of Design and Graduate Studies at OCAD University. She specializes in experience design, interactive media, art, and technology research. She is a founding researcher with the Mobile Experience Lab and a principal network investigator with the GRAND Canadian National Centre of Excellence, and the Centre for Innovation in Data Visualisation and Data-Driven Design (CIV-DDD). She is the author of numerous articles on digital technology and entertainment and has shown her work internationally. In the 1990s, Martha was the Head of Design with Peter Gabriel’s Real World Group in the U.K. She had a prominent international career as a performer, writer, and recording artist in the 1980s. Martha completed her PhD on Eros, Women, and Technology in 2013, in the Communication and Culture Program at York University, and continued her research as a Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, in 2014.

Project Title: Data Corpus: Personal Narrative & The Sensory Body

Abstract: As a narrator I am embodied and given materiality and relationship through production, reproduction, and reception of my story. Through the introduction of a series of collaborative mobile and interactive artworks and design projects and interventions (2007-2015) employing narrative in shared public and private space, I will show the sensory body in relation to place as the locus of my research practice.

Presenter 2: Richard Fung, Faculty of Art

Bio: Richard Fung is an award-winning video artist and writer. His tapes, which include My Mother's Place (1990), Sea in the Blood (2000) and Dal Puri Diaspora (2012), have been widely screened and collected internationally, and broadcast in Canada, the United States and the Caribbean. His essays have published in numerous journals and anthologies, and he is the co-author with Monika Kin Gagnon of 13: Conversations on Art and Cultural Race Politics (2002). Among other grants and awards, Richard is a recipient of the Bell Canada Award for Video Art and the Toronto Arts Award for Media Art. He teaches in the Integrated Media program and the Art and Social Change minor at OCAD University.

Project Title: Re:Orientations

Abstract: Re:Orientations is a four-year research creation project culminating in a documentary film. In 1985, he released his first video, Orientations: Lesbian and Gay Asians, which was the first documentary focused on queer Asians and on racialized queers in Canada. Re:Orientations records original subjects as they review their interview footage from 30 years ago, triggering reflections on their life journeys as well as on the shifts and continuities in sexual and racial identities, conditions and politics. The project is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 205 Richmond St. W. Digital Futures Salon, Room 701K  

Research Rendezvous

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Monday, November 17, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

Research Rendezvous is a monthly lunchtime series for faculty and students to share and learn about research at OCAD U.

Come share your ideas, connect with potential collaborators and find out how you can get involved in research.

DR. PETER JONES is an associate professor in the Faculty of Design, teaching in the Strategic Foresight and Innovation MDes program since 2009. He received a Ph.D. from the Union Institute (Cincinnati, Ohio) in Design and Innovation Management, and an M.A. in Human Factors – Experimental Psychology from the University of Dayton (Ohio). Dr. Jones founded the innovation research consultancy Redesign in 2001 and maintains an active practice. A system and information service designer, Peter has designed market-leading information products/services for healthcare, scientific, legal and business practices, and advises organizations on product/service design, innovation strategy and competency building. 

Peter’s healthcare work has focused on information services in care practice and clinical education primarily. He has led design and research for leading decision and educational services and interactive products for physicians, nurses, and medical students. He wrote Design for Care to help designers deliver systemically relevant solutions to the emerging problems of multidisciplinary healthcare services and the complexity of care.

Dr. Jones has published over 15 peer-reviewed research articles and authored three books: Design for Care (2013, Rosenfeld Media), We Tried to Warn You (Nimble Books, 2008) and Team Design (McGraw-Hill, 1998). 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Room 187 100 McCaul Street
Cost: 
Free

Research Redezvous: Annette Blum & Stuart Candy

Research Rendezvous Poster
Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

A monthly lunchtime series for faculty and students to share and learn about research at OCAD U

Visual Narrative, Empowerment and Healing in the Aftermath of Political Violence and Trauma in South Africa and Guatemala,
Annette Blum (PI)

On The Futurematic Vending Machine (and Assorted Other Projects),
Stuart Candy (PI)

Venue & Address: 
Room 187 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
<p><a href="mailto:research@ocadu.ca">research@ocadu.ca</a></p>
Cost: 
Free

Research Rendezvous: The Tecumseh Papers, Bonnie Devine

Research Rendezvous Art
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm

A monthly lunchtime series for faculty and students to share and learn about research at OCAD U.

Bonnie Devine, Associate Professor at OCAD University, will talk about the research she did last summer on Tecumseh that culminated in an exhibition at the Art Gallery of Windsor Ontario in September 2013.

Bonnie Devine is the Founding Chair of OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture Program. She is an installation artist, curator, writer, and educator, and a member of the Serpent River First Nation of Northern Ontario (Anishinaabe/Ojibwa.

Venue & Address: 
Room 187 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
<p><a href="mailto:research@ocadu.ca">research@ocadu.ca</a></p>
Cost: 
Free

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