Industrial Design students designing for social change

 

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 5:00am

The students have the concepts, the sewing collective has the skills. Second-year Industrial Design students are teaming up with a sewing collective run by women in Regent Park to create marketable products and a potential source of added income for the community.

The collaboration came about when assistant professor Ranee Lee met with Angela Draskovic, president of the Yonge Street Mission, to discuss how design for social innovation can fit in with Toronto’s Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Lee learned about projects going on in Regent Park and found a way to integrate the sewing collective into her existing curriculum for the design course Identity Materialized, giving students an opportunity to engage in experiential learning.

Members of the collective welcomed the students to their workspace at a Gerrard St. community centre in November. They started the collective as a way to get together with other women and sew clothing and household goods.

The students are now taking what they learned from members of the collective and applying it to a soft goods project in class. This involves designing products that can be produced locally by the collective, developing a brand identity that reflects the revitalized Regent Park, conducting market research and creating advertising for the collective and its products.

In December, members of the collective will come to OCAD University to hear the students present their design ideas and, in turn, to give their own feedback and input.

President Diamond and President Murphy with students
The province’s leading universities focused on technology and design have teamed up to forge a new modelfor the delivery of post-secondary education in Ontario: together OCAD U and Ontario Tech University will develop dynamic new ways of learning, curriculum, programs and research capacities.
by Jody Hewgill
Assistant Professor Jody Hewgill will be giving a lecture on her illustration practice on Thursday, April 18, 2019, at Syracuse University, School of Art, as part of the visiting artist lecture series.
Auctioneer Stephen Ranger, photo by Martin Iskander
Once again, OCAD U’s Project 31 fundraising auction was a great success, raising much-needed funds for scholarships and bursaries for students in financial need and the purchase of specialized equipment. This year, Project 31 featured 39 works donated by 42 of OCAD U’s award-winning faculty members and alumni. This year’s auction raised $144,250 (gross) and since 2010, the event has raised more than $1 million (net). 
Sesesiw (Yellow Legs) poster
The Office of Research & Innovation is excited to announce the launch of a second iteration of the "THIS IS RESEARCH" campaign, intended to raise awareness about research at OCAD University.
Dear Members of the OCAD U Community:  At 4:45 p.m. on Friday afternoon, OCAD University received the devastating news that the government of Ontario has withdrawn provincial funding for the Creative City Campus (CCC). We are unwilling to accept this as a final decision.  Ontario’s competitiveness depends on OCAD University’s talent. Our institution delivers practical, technical, creative learning to fulfil the needs of Ontario’s labour market. 
OCAD University graduate Yechel Gagnon was recognized at the end of March as Creator of the Year in Montérégie, QC, a $5000 prize given by the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ). The 17th edition of the award gathered more than 80 people from the Monteregian artistic community, along with partners and friends of the culture.
Still 1 from EMILY
OCAD U Continuing Studies instructor Otino Corsano's Ocean Course Films presents "EMILY" at FlagNoFlags, Chiesa di San Carlo e Sant’Agata in Reggio Emilia, Italy.
Environmental Design Professor Doreen Balabanoff is presenting her peer-reviewed papers that have been produced from her half sabbatical time at Massey College as a Visiting Scholar.
Industrial Design students with sewing collective members
Sewing collective member shows fabric to students
Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 5:00am

The students have the concepts, the sewing collective has the skills. Second-year Industrial Design students are teaming up with a sewing collective run by women in Regent Park to create marketable products and a potential source of added income for the community.

The collaboration came about when assistant professor Ranee Lee met with Angela Draskovic, president of the Yonge Street Mission, to discuss how design for social innovation can fit in with Toronto’s Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Lee learned about projects going on in Regent Park and found a way to integrate the sewing collective into her existing curriculum for the design course Identity Materialized, giving students an opportunity to engage in experiential learning.

Members of the collective welcomed the students to their workspace at a Gerrard St. community centre in November. They started the collective as a way to get together with other women and sew clothing and household goods.

The students are now taking what they learned from members of the collective and applying it to a soft goods project in class. This involves designing products that can be produced locally by the collective, developing a brand identity that reflects the revitalized Regent Park, conducting market research and creating advertising for the collective and its products.

In December, members of the collective will come to OCAD University to hear the students present their design ideas and, in turn, to give their own feedback and input.