Paula Gardner and Charles Reeve co-edit PUBLIC 49: TRAUMA

 

Tuesday, June 24, 2014 - 3:30pm

Associate Professors Paula Gardner and Charles Reeve are celebrating the launch of PUBLIC 49: TRAUMA, the latest issue of the interdisciplinary, double blind peer-reviewed visual arts journal. As co-editors, Gardner and Reeve curated the publication, which includes works by Francis Frascina, Lynn Crosbie, Florence Duchemin-Pelletier, Lloyd C. McCracken, Deanna Browne, Blake Fitzpatrick and Vid Ingelevics, and Ian Balfour.

Abstract:
When culture responds to trauma, it seems self-evident that three mechanisms are involved: the event, the trauma it provokes, and the cultural response. But what if that is backwards? What if trauma is itself a cultural production, borne of a need for societies to see themselves as traumatized? By bringing together essays, artistic interventions, and poetry, this collection examines trauma’s relation to culture in a variety of settings, from contemporary visual culture, to the art of the Inuit, to personal remembrances. Along the way, our contributors inspect the place of catharsis in the constellation of event, disturbance, repression, and release. To highlight the complexity of these mechanisms, we are especially pleased that “Trauma” includes “For You, The War is Over,” a previously-unpublished recollection by Canadian Airman Lloyd McCracken of his time in a Nazi POW camp, presented here with the generous permission of his family.

Preview and purchase PUBLIC 29: TRAUMA online 

Floor plate diagram of new Fabrication Studio layout
Read on for all the details on the renovations happening in the Fabrication Studios until December 31, 2019. 
Storytelling Co-design Workshop with ESL high school students - Spring 2019
The Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC) at OCAD University has received a $1.2 million grant from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for advancing diversity, equity and inclusion in open education. The grant will support the IDRC’s Flexible Learning for Open Education (FLOE) project, which pushes the understanding and practice of equitable inclusion within open teaching and learning by providing resources to personalize how students learn and to address barriers to learning. 
Located in Kensington Market, Ignite Gallery is currently recruiting IWSP-eligible Student Monitors for the Fall/Winter term to serve as front-line staff informing visitors about exhibitions and public events, to supervise the gallery, responsible for opening and closing procedures and assist with install takedown and special events programing. 
11 of Revision Path's podcasts were selected for the permanent podcast collection of the Smithsonian’s African American Museum
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The Black Sparks fundraising campaign will support Black artists and designers by funding OCAD U’s Black Youth Design Initiative.
Dragula
MAAD graduate, Yovska Martinez Moreno (2018), will be featured on Season 3 of Boulet Brothers Dragula, a web-based series that can be accessed via Amazon Prime.
Universities Canada announced today the nine student winners of the national 2019 Innovative Designs for Accessibility (IDeA) competition, who were recognized for their work in breaking down accessibility barriers on their campuses and in their communities.
Image from PUBLIC 49: TRAUMA
Tuesday, June 24, 2014 - 3:30pm

Associate Professors Paula Gardner and Charles Reeve are celebrating the launch of PUBLIC 49: TRAUMA, the latest issue of the interdisciplinary, double blind peer-reviewed visual arts journal. As co-editors, Gardner and Reeve curated the publication, which includes works by Francis Frascina, Lynn Crosbie, Florence Duchemin-Pelletier, Lloyd C. McCracken, Deanna Browne, Blake Fitzpatrick and Vid Ingelevics, and Ian Balfour.

Abstract:
When culture responds to trauma, it seems self-evident that three mechanisms are involved: the event, the trauma it provokes, and the cultural response. But what if that is backwards? What if trauma is itself a cultural production, borne of a need for societies to see themselves as traumatized? By bringing together essays, artistic interventions, and poetry, this collection examines trauma’s relation to culture in a variety of settings, from contemporary visual culture, to the art of the Inuit, to personal remembrances. Along the way, our contributors inspect the place of catharsis in the constellation of event, disturbance, repression, and release. To highlight the complexity of these mechanisms, we are especially pleased that “Trauma” includes “For You, The War is Over,” a previously-unpublished recollection by Canadian Airman Lloyd McCracken of his time in a Nazi POW camp, presented here with the generous permission of his family.

Preview and purchase PUBLIC 29: TRAUMA online