Update: Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020

 

Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 1:15pm

Professor Saskia van Kampen (San Francisco State U) and Associate Professor Cheryl Giraudy (OCAD U) have received almost $25,000 under the Canada SSHRC Partner Engage Grant (PEG)
for their Toronto-based research project Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020.

“Design speaks to the potential for equitable spaces and attempts to visually and physically represent our collective aspirations for the future”-Colloqate Design

Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020, a 4+ phase 2-year research project employing Narrative Inquiry and Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods has been working with Toronto’s municipalities and community members through story-sharing and creative workshops to find unique, ad hoc and grassroots interventions for placemaking in the urban context. The project has now partnered with New Orleans-based, non-profit Colloqate Design for a “Creative Practice as Protest” (CPP) Workshop, and an exciting student/NextGen Ideas Competition that will be funded through the partnership grant. Working with Colloqate Design’s founder, architect Bryan C. Lee, Jr., professors van Kampen and Giraudy will organize two events aimed at youth in the city-an inclusive and respectful design workshop, and a borough-wide placemaking Ideas Competition that addresses pressing community issues. Colloqate states:

“Injustice and inequity manifest relative to their respective context. We see the opportunity to work with OCAD U on this project as a means to grow the base of knowledge around interventions in space outside of a U.S. context. We are attempting to grow the Design Justice field through organizing students, academic theory and community collaboration. This [project] would effectively allow for that  work to develop within the structure of a top-level university.” -Bryan C. Lee, AIA.

Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020 overall objectives seek to understand how innovative methods for placemaking emerge at the community level through creative practice, and what will be the longerterm social impact of their  implementation? Toronto has experienced massive growth with both positive and challenging outcomes that come with fast-paced urban sprawl including: racial and economic inequity across neighbourhoods, gentrification of established older neighbourhoods, a growing schism between left and right political perspectives among many other challenges and outcomes. From major infrastructure projects to modernist projects such as New City Hall, or a contentious amalgamation of diverse independent municipalities, there is a zeitgeist of Toronto as a collection of evolving neighbourhoods connected by a transit network that everyone loves to
complain about. The project is positioned to understand how each of Toronto’s six distinct boroughs with vastly different history, demographics, neighbourhood character, and other qualities generate ad
hoc placemaking with creative practice such as art and design as the catalyst. The research work has an inclusive design focus, which expands our thinking about accessible environments by considering cultural, ethnic,  racial and other areas of ‘difference’. Incorporating Inclusive Design (Altay & Demirkan), along with Experiential Learning (Kolb, Fry, et. al.) and Reflective Practice (Roland) the project relates success in placemaking to how people with lived-experiences of spaces drive the planning process to become active participants in co-design of communities.

Through the partnership grant, professors Giraudy and van Kampen aim to inspire NextGen creative thinkers in the city to continue to build and nurture a society that lives up to Toronto’s global reputation as one of the most livable, multicultural urban areas in the world. Following this phase of participatory research, the team hope to leverage it as a case study for similar activities at San Francisco State University over the coming years, where both theoretical and practice-based outcomes can be applied.

 

References:

  • Altay, B. & Demirkan, H. (2014). Inclusive Design: Developing Students’ Knowledge and Attitude Through Empathic Modelling. International Journal of Inclusive Education 18(2), 196–217 Eisinger, P. (2000). The Politics of Bread and Circuses: Building the City for the Visitor Class. Urban Affairs Review, 35(3), 316–333. 
  • Lee, Bryan, C. (2019). Colloqate Design.. Retrieved from colloqate.org/about
  • Project for Public Spaces. Home. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.pps.org/Toronto.ca. (1998–2019). Moving to Toronto. toronto.ca/community-people/moving-to-toronto/.
  • Roland, K. (2017). Experiential Learning: Learning through Reflective Practice International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education (IJCDSE), Volume 8, Issue, 2983-2989. Retrieved from https://infonomics-society.org/ijcdse/published-papers/volume-8-2017/
  • Zitcer, A. (2018). Making Up Creative Placemaking. Journal of Planning Education and Research.
  • doi:10.1177/0739456x18773424

Photo of human with winter green coat sitting and staring at camera
The Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers is excited to announce Dallas Fellini as the recipient of the inaugural Rosalie Sharp Pavilion Career Launcher.
EKSIG 2019 was the international conference of the DRS Special Interest Group on Experiential Knowledge (EKSIG). The event took place 23–24 September 2019 at the Estonian Academy of Arts, Tallinn, Estonia. With the theme ‘knowing together – experiential knowledge and collaboration,’ the conference explored collaborative knowledge generation by professionals and academic researchers in the creative disciplines and beyond.
The OCAD University community is deeply saddened by the passing of John Vivash, former Chair of the OCAD U Foundation (2008 to 2015). John passed away on August 5, 2019.
Mural of food illustrations
OCAD University’s Centre for Emerging Artists and Designers (CEAD) are thrilled to announce a new large-scale mural by artist Jinke Wang (Illustration 18’) in the dining hall of the newly opened Longo’s in Liberty Village.
Image of plant in front of sun in distance
Footprints of the Rouge depicts the important connections experienced during Margaret Cornell Kirk's time as Photographer-in-Residence at Rouge National Urban Park.
Joanne Frisch, video still
Take a sneak peek video tour into OCAD U's newly renovated Fabrication Centre, scheduled to reopen in January!
Please see poster for full details. 
Lisa Deanne Smith accepts OAAG award on behalf of Onsite Gallery and Patricio Dávila
The Ontario Association of Art Galleries (OAAG) announced Onsite Gallery and Patricio Dávila as winner of the First Exhibition at a Public Gallery award at its 2019 OAAG Awards gala last night. Dávila, Associate Professor, Faculty of Design, Graduate Studies, at OCAD U, curated the exhibition Diagrams of Power at OCAD U’s Onsite Gallery. The exhibition showcased art and design works using data, diagrams, maps and visualizations as ways of challenging dominant narratives and supporting the resilience of marginalized communities.
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 1:15pm

Professor Saskia van Kampen (San Francisco State U) and Associate Professor Cheryl Giraudy (OCAD U) have received almost $25,000 under the Canada SSHRC Partner Engage Grant (PEG)
for their Toronto-based research project Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020.

“Design speaks to the potential for equitable spaces and attempts to visually and physically represent our collective aspirations for the future”-Colloqate Design

Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020, a 4+ phase 2-year research project employing Narrative Inquiry and Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods has been working with Toronto’s municipalities and community members through story-sharing and creative workshops to find unique, ad hoc and grassroots interventions for placemaking in the urban context. The project has now partnered with New Orleans-based, non-profit Colloqate Design for a “Creative Practice as Protest” (CPP) Workshop, and an exciting student/NextGen Ideas Competition that will be funded through the partnership grant. Working with Colloqate Design’s founder, architect Bryan C. Lee, Jr., professors van Kampen and Giraudy will organize two events aimed at youth in the city-an inclusive and respectful design workshop, and a borough-wide placemaking Ideas Competition that addresses pressing community issues. Colloqate states:

“Injustice and inequity manifest relative to their respective context. We see the opportunity to work with OCAD U on this project as a means to grow the base of knowledge around interventions in space outside of a U.S. context. We are attempting to grow the Design Justice field through organizing students, academic theory and community collaboration. This [project] would effectively allow for that  work to develop within the structure of a top-level university.” -Bryan C. Lee, AIA.

Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020 overall objectives seek to understand how innovative methods for placemaking emerge at the community level through creative practice, and what will be the longerterm social impact of their  implementation? Toronto has experienced massive growth with both positive and challenging outcomes that come with fast-paced urban sprawl including: racial and economic inequity across neighbourhoods, gentrification of established older neighbourhoods, a growing schism between left and right political perspectives among many other challenges and outcomes. From major infrastructure projects to modernist projects such as New City Hall, or a contentious amalgamation of diverse independent municipalities, there is a zeitgeist of Toronto as a collection of evolving neighbourhoods connected by a transit network that everyone loves to
complain about. The project is positioned to understand how each of Toronto’s six distinct boroughs with vastly different history, demographics, neighbourhood character, and other qualities generate ad
hoc placemaking with creative practice such as art and design as the catalyst. The research work has an inclusive design focus, which expands our thinking about accessible environments by considering cultural, ethnic,  racial and other areas of ‘difference’. Incorporating Inclusive Design (Altay & Demirkan), along with Experiential Learning (Kolb, Fry, et. al.) and Reflective Practice (Roland) the project relates success in placemaking to how people with lived-experiences of spaces drive the planning process to become active participants in co-design of communities.

Through the partnership grant, professors Giraudy and van Kampen aim to inspire NextGen creative thinkers in the city to continue to build and nurture a society that lives up to Toronto’s global reputation as one of the most livable, multicultural urban areas in the world. Following this phase of participatory research, the team hope to leverage it as a case study for similar activities at San Francisco State University over the coming years, where both theoretical and practice-based outcomes can be applied.

 

References:

  • Altay, B. & Demirkan, H. (2014). Inclusive Design: Developing Students’ Knowledge and Attitude Through Empathic Modelling. International Journal of Inclusive Education 18(2), 196–217 Eisinger, P. (2000). The Politics of Bread and Circuses: Building the City for the Visitor Class. Urban Affairs Review, 35(3), 316–333. 
  • Lee, Bryan, C. (2019). Colloqate Design.. Retrieved from colloqate.org/about
  • Project for Public Spaces. Home. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.pps.org/Toronto.ca. (1998–2019). Moving to Toronto. toronto.ca/community-people/moving-to-toronto/.
  • Roland, K. (2017). Experiential Learning: Learning through Reflective Practice International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education (IJCDSE), Volume 8, Issue, 2983-2989. Retrieved from https://infonomics-society.org/ijcdse/published-papers/volume-8-2017/
  • Zitcer, A. (2018). Making Up Creative Placemaking. Journal of Planning Education and Research.
  • doi:10.1177/0739456x18773424
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