Decoding Origins: Creating a Visual Language of Marks featured in Media

Photo of Ladly, Keefer and Chadha presenting on the research, seated in front of a powerpoint projection.
Martha Ladly (left) Katrina Keefer (centre) and Kartikay Chadha (right) present on the research. Photo c/o Katrina Keefer.

The research project Decoding Origins: Creating a Visual Language of Marks,  led by Dr. Martha Ladly of OCAD U and Dr. Katrina Keefer of Trent University, was recently featured in an article by CBC News: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/scarification-trent-ocad-slave-trade-identity-1.5014143).

Dr. Keefer was also interviewed on the CBC Morning radio show, available here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1U4P0OnwH4w7b1Fq_k9RYy969T05llnaQ.

This research project is based on the rich history of applying permanent body marks, such as scarification and tattoos, to represent individual’s membership in African kin groups and local societies. It seeks to trace origins of enslaved peoples of Africa, and to address the obliteration of identities for enslaved individuals, which is one of the lasting legacies of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The researchers received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

Department: 
Photo of Ladly, Keefer and Chadha presenting on the research, seated in front of a powerpoint projection.
Martha Ladly (left) Katrina Keefer (centre) and Kartikay Chadha (right) present on the research. Photo c/o Katrina Keefer.

The research project Decoding Origins: Creating a Visual Language of Marks,  led by Dr. Martha Ladly of OCAD U and Dr. Katrina Keefer of Trent University, was recently featured in an article by CBC News: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/scarification-trent-ocad-slave-trade-identity-1.5014143).

Dr. Keefer was also interviewed on the CBC Morning radio show, available here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1U4P0OnwH4w7b1Fq_k9RYy969T05llnaQ.

This research project is based on the rich history of applying permanent body marks, such as scarification and tattoos, to represent individual’s membership in African kin groups and local societies. It seeks to trace origins of enslaved peoples of Africa, and to address the obliteration of identities for enslaved individuals, which is one of the lasting legacies of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The researchers received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

Department: