TORONTO WEARABLES MEETUP 08: JESSICA THOMPSON AND THE H2.0 COLLECTIVE
Friday August 19th, 2016

Kate Hartman with the H2.0 Collective

This month’s meetup featured Toronto-based media artist Jessica Thompson, who spoke to us about using the body as the site of the artwork, in both public and intimate ways. Jessica works predominantly with sound, interactivity, and the body. Her work entitled Walking Machine allows one to privately hear the sounds of their amplified footsteps. Using the device, or even watching one use the device, creates an atmosphere of play when people engage with their footsteps and the urban environment in new ways. Walking Machine (2003) engages the “physical and psychological space that you move through when walking, “ says Jessica. “You are extending the body through sound; articulating one’s presence in space.”

 

Jessica Thompson speaks about her Soundride project

Jessica incorporates a practice of ‘play’ to engage people in her work, sometimes integrating childhood activities, as in Bike Hack and Soundride(ongoing since 2005). In this collaborative piece, participants make bicycle-mounted noisemakers that are then amplified for the broader public to hear, in what she calls a “large-scale sound ride”.  Jessica's work lies at the intersection of the public, the personal, and the performative.

 

Chris Holborn showing "Joyful", the confetti-blowing dress

The H2.0 Collective, comprised of Mike Vaughan, Lorett Faveri, Joanne Jin and Chris Holborn, presented their series of anthropromorphic dresses that were recently on display at OCAD University during Nuit Blanche. The garments, titled “Lustful”, Anti-social”, “Bashful” and “Joyful” were each engaged by interaction from the viewer, by way of motion, proximity, and sound. One dress, “Lustful”, was embellished in LEDs and flower petals. When a person moved in front of the dress, it lit up and sounds of a woman’s orgasm were heard. “Joyful”, the party dress of the bunch, filled up with air and blew confetti through a layer of its translucent skirt. The Collective spoke of their individual inspirations for each piece while showing their supporting mood boards for each one. In typical Toronto Wearables fashion, the night ended with a large group of people interacting with electronic garments, and wondering “what next?” for these exciting technologies available to them.

 

Mingling with e-garments



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Kate Hartman with the H2.0 Collective

This month’s meetup featured Toronto-based media artist Jessica Thompson, who spoke to us about using the body as the site of the artwork, in both public and intimate ways. Jessica works predominantly with sound, interactivity, and the body. Her work entitled Walking Machine allows one to privately hear the sounds of their amplified footsteps. Using the device, or even watching one use the device, creates an atmosphere of play when people engage with their footsteps and the urban environment in new ways. Walking Machine (2003) engages the “physical and psychological space that you move through when walking, “ says Jessica. “You are extending the body through sound; articulating one’s presence in space.”

 

Jessica Thompson speaks about her Soundride project

Jessica incorporates a practice of ‘play’ to engage people in her work, sometimes integrating childhood activities, as in Bike Hack and Soundride(ongoing since 2005). In this collaborative piece, participants make bicycle-mounted noisemakers that are then amplified for the broader public to hear, in what she calls a “large-scale sound ride”.  Jessica's work lies at the intersection of the public, the personal, and the performative.

 

Chris Holborn showing "Joyful", the confetti-blowing dress

The H2.0 Collective, comprised of Mike Vaughan, Lorett Faveri, Joanne Jin and Chris Holborn, presented their series of anthropromorphic dresses that were recently on display at OCAD University during Nuit Blanche. The garments, titled “Lustful”, Anti-social”, “Bashful” and “Joyful” were each engaged by interaction from the viewer, by way of motion, proximity, and sound. One dress, “Lustful”, was embellished in LEDs and flower petals. When a person moved in front of the dress, it lit up and sounds of a woman’s orgasm were heard. “Joyful”, the party dress of the bunch, filled up with air and blew confetti through a layer of its translucent skirt. The Collective spoke of their individual inspirations for each piece while showing their supporting mood boards for each one. In typical Toronto Wearables fashion, the night ended with a large group of people interacting with electronic garments, and wondering “what next?” for these exciting technologies available to them.

 

Mingling with e-garments