TORONTO WEARABLES MEETUP 15: GREGORY PHILLIPS AND JP RISHEA
Friday August 19th, 2016

Our September meetup was a smash hit!  Gregory Phillips, a recent OCAD graduate with a background in jewelry design gave us a detailed process of his 3D printed algorithmic jewelry designed using Rhino and a wonderful plugin called Grasshopper.  Greg shared with us his interest in generative design and his inspiration found in the complex forms of nature. While his designs appear intensely mathematical, he asserts that the process can be simpler than one would think when using Grasshopper, which allows him to create geometry on the fly via data-driven input.  Simple modifications to the parameters can drastically change the design of the 3D form.  In this way, Greg is able to create entire series of pieces that echo their predecessor with minimal fussing about.

 

Greg also spoke to us about the importance of open-source software and the impact that this has had on him as a designer. Iris van Herpen, a fashion designer also inspired by physics and systems of nature states that “designers create for humans; developers create for computers”.  What happens with designers create for computers, and that computer, in turn, creates for humans?  Gorgeously sculpted, visually intriguing, 3D printed jewelry; that’s what happens.

 

Following Greg was JP Rishea, a graduate of Humber College’s Automation and Robotics program.  JP makes kinetic wearables often actuated by c02 and fabricated in aluminum.  His interest lies in articulated mechanisms of the body, and are at times inspired by sci-fi/action flicks.  He is interested in extending bodily functions, like superheroes do. His “Grappler”, for example, is a forearm-mounted weighty exo-skeletal appendage with a CO2 actuated claw that can abruptly reach out and grab an object from 2 feet away.  The throwing version of the Grappler is akin to Spiderman’s web, cast from the hands and allows reaching and grabbing objects at a distance.  All of his work involves manual control mechanisms, as he tends to shy away from electronics and microcontrollers in favour of his tried-and-true robust designs.  There is something greatly satisfying about this strictly mechanical/manual process and design.  Rishea reasons this through his belief that people want to control technology themselves, rather than be controlled by it.  “The future is more ‘Ghost in the Shell’ than ‘Terminator’”, he says.  “Humans have forever been wanting to extend their functions, to jump higher or run faster; we’ve been seeing this in movies all along -- people want to control technology, not be passive toward it.”



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Our September meetup was a smash hit!  Gregory Phillips, a recent OCAD graduate with a background in jewelry design gave us a detailed process of his 3D printed algorithmic jewelry designed using Rhino and a wonderful plugin called Grasshopper.  Greg shared with us his interest in generative design and his inspiration found in the complex forms of nature. While his designs appear intensely mathematical, he asserts that the process can be simpler than one would think when using Grasshopper, which allows him to create geometry on the fly via data-driven input.  Simple modifications to the parameters can drastically change the design of the 3D form.  In this way, Greg is able to create entire series of pieces that echo their predecessor with minimal fussing about.

 

Greg also spoke to us about the importance of open-source software and the impact that this has had on him as a designer. Iris van Herpen, a fashion designer also inspired by physics and systems of nature states that “designers create for humans; developers create for computers”.  What happens with designers create for computers, and that computer, in turn, creates for humans?  Gorgeously sculpted, visually intriguing, 3D printed jewelry; that’s what happens.

 

Following Greg was JP Rishea, a graduate of Humber College’s Automation and Robotics program.  JP makes kinetic wearables often actuated by c02 and fabricated in aluminum.  His interest lies in articulated mechanisms of the body, and are at times inspired by sci-fi/action flicks.  He is interested in extending bodily functions, like superheroes do. His “Grappler”, for example, is a forearm-mounted weighty exo-skeletal appendage with a CO2 actuated claw that can abruptly reach out and grab an object from 2 feet away.  The throwing version of the Grappler is akin to Spiderman’s web, cast from the hands and allows reaching and grabbing objects at a distance.  All of his work involves manual control mechanisms, as he tends to shy away from electronics and microcontrollers in favour of his tried-and-true robust designs.  There is something greatly satisfying about this strictly mechanical/manual process and design.  Rishea reasons this through his belief that people want to control technology themselves, rather than be controlled by it.  “The future is more ‘Ghost in the Shell’ than ‘Terminator’”, he says.  “Humans have forever been wanting to extend their functions, to jump higher or run faster; we’ve been seeing this in movies all along -- people want to control technology, not be passive toward it.”