TWM 22: SOCIAL BODY LAB PROJECTS
Friday August 19th, 2016

For the final installation of TWM in this academic year, we shared the various projects that we’ve been working on for the past eight months.  We began with Loretta Faveri’s SoMo project, in which she has developed different forms of wireless dance sensors and custom software for use by dancers and choreographers.  She has developed two prototypes: one, which is a piece of dance footwear that has embedded pressure sensors in the toe and heel; and the other, which is a thin canvas band to be worn on either the arm or the ankle, and that has an accelerometer to measure the acceleration of movement from the dancer’s body.  Both of these devices use an Xbee radio transceiver to transmit sensor data wirelessly to a nearby laptop.  Loretta has developed a custom software interface that will allow the choreographer to calibrate sensor data, select sound files, and affect characteristics of the sound.  One of her challenges in designing this product was the sound.  Many of the dancers and choreographers that she worked with were more drawn to sounds from nature rather than the synthesized sounds that her software initially offered.  She has new ideas in this area to include more diverse sound libraries and ways of affecting the sound so that it will be more satisfactory to her demographic.  Currently Loretta has worked with Ballet Jorgen at George Brown College, and the Studio for Movement.  You can learn more about SoMo by visiting www.somobysonicwear.com

Following Loretta, Hillary Predko spoke about wearable, fashionable bike lights developed in the lab.  This work was in collaboration with Vega, a fashion design company led by Angella Mackey.  Much of the process of the project was about material exploration, “off-value”, and creating a sophisticated, robust design that would give new “class” to bike lights.  In the end they had come up with two designs: a silicone glowstick-like design that could clip anywhere onto the clothes, and a very smart looking laser-cut leather design with a silvery panel that the light would peek out of.  This design used magnets to adhere to clothing, and so could also be clipped along any seam or edge of an existing garment.  For more information on Vega-X Bike Lights, visit the Bike Lights page.

For the last presentation, Erin Lewis and Kate Hartman spoke about the Nudgeables Accessory Kit.  Nudgeables is a modular hardware kit designed for creating paired sets of wireless wearable communication devices.   You can embed the main circuit board into a garment or accessory, and with the creative use of a DIY switch and the application of a vibration board, you are able to get your partner’s attention from a distance.  Think of it as being similar to a Facebook “poke”, or as Morse code for your clothing! They spoke about the process of board design and kit development, and then in more detail about the works they commissioned from both professional and emerging designers.  All of the commissions can be seen at www.nudgeables.com



socialbody's picture

For the final installation of TWM in this academic year, we shared the various projects that we’ve been working on for the past eight months.  We began with Loretta Faveri’s SoMo project, in which she has developed different forms of wireless dance sensors and custom software for use by dancers and choreographers.  She has developed two prototypes: one, which is a piece of dance footwear that has embedded pressure sensors in the toe and heel; and the other, which is a thin canvas band to be worn on either the arm or the ankle, and that has an accelerometer to measure the acceleration of movement from the dancer’s body.  Both of these devices use an Xbee radio transceiver to transmit sensor data wirelessly to a nearby laptop.  Loretta has developed a custom software interface that will allow the choreographer to calibrate sensor data, select sound files, and affect characteristics of the sound.  One of her challenges in designing this product was the sound.  Many of the dancers and choreographers that she worked with were more drawn to sounds from nature rather than the synthesized sounds that her software initially offered.  She has new ideas in this area to include more diverse sound libraries and ways of affecting the sound so that it will be more satisfactory to her demographic.  Currently Loretta has worked with Ballet Jorgen at George Brown College, and the Studio for Movement.  You can learn more about SoMo by visiting www.somobysonicwear.com

Following Loretta, Hillary Predko spoke about wearable, fashionable bike lights developed in the lab.  This work was in collaboration with Vega, a fashion design company led by Angella Mackey.  Much of the process of the project was about material exploration, “off-value”, and creating a sophisticated, robust design that would give new “class” to bike lights.  In the end they had come up with two designs: a silicone glowstick-like design that could clip anywhere onto the clothes, and a very smart looking laser-cut leather design with a silvery panel that the light would peek out of.  This design used magnets to adhere to clothing, and so could also be clipped along any seam or edge of an existing garment.  For more information on Vega-X Bike Lights, visit the Bike Lights page.

For the last presentation, Erin Lewis and Kate Hartman spoke about the Nudgeables Accessory Kit.  Nudgeables is a modular hardware kit designed for creating paired sets of wireless wearable communication devices.   You can embed the main circuit board into a garment or accessory, and with the creative use of a DIY switch and the application of a vibration board, you are able to get your partner’s attention from a distance.  Think of it as being similar to a Facebook “poke”, or as Morse code for your clothing! They spoke about the process of board design and kit development, and then in more detail about the works they commissioned from both professional and emerging designers.  All of the commissions can be seen at www.nudgeables.com