10 Years, 10 Questions with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective


ONSITE/incite/inquire: 10 Years, 10 Questions with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA)

 
DateSaturday, March 5, 2016 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Phone

416-977-6000, Ext. 456

Cost

FREE

Email

onsite@ocadu.ca

Website

http://www.facebook.com/events/1739135719651011/

Location

OCAD University’s Central Hall 100 McCaul St., Second Floor, Room 230

ONSITE/incite/inquire: 10 Years, 10 Questions with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA)

Speakers: Dayna Danger and Clayton Windatt
Moderator: Ryan Rice, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University

The Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD University and Onsite Gallery are pleased to present members of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective in 10 Years, 10 Questions.

Onsite Gallery’s 2016 ONSITE/ program investigates how we stimulate change through public platforms outside the gallery. Through an open conversation with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA), we will address current trends in Indigenous Curatorial Practice and the impact ACC/CCA signifies over the last 10 years.

10 Years, 10 Questions will incite audiences to inquire into the present effects of past efforts.

Event is FREE, all are welcome
The space is wheelchair accessible through use of elevators from the ground floor
Refreshments will be provided by Tea n Bannock, courtesy of Onsite Gallery 

Dayna Danger
Dayna Danger is an emerging Queer, Metis/Ojibway/Polish artist raised in Winnipeg, MB. Utilizing photography, sculpture, and video, Danger's practice questions the line between empowerment and objectification by claiming space with her human scale work. Co-opting the visual language of fashion and pornography, she repurposes and challenges perceptions of power, gender, performativity, representation, sexuality, and mixed identities. Danger is currently based in Montreal, QC while obtaining her Graduate degree in Studio Arts from Concordia University. She graduated with her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) from The University of Manitoba’s School of Art in 2010. Danger held a Visual Arts Studio Work Study at the Banff Centre and participated in Candice Hopkins and Raven Chacon’s thematic residency, Trading Post. In 2012-2013 Danger was mentored by Amber-Dawn Bear Robe and Daina Warren, as part of MAWA’s (Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art) Foundation Mentorship Program. Her work was displayed at the New Mexico Museum of Art's exhibition, New Native Photography 2011, for Santa Fe’s Indian Market in Santa Fe, NM. Danger’s first solo exhibition, Big’Uns, was shown at Urban Shaman gallery in Winnipeg MB, June 2014. Danger currently serves as a board member for the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/ Collectif des Conservateurs Autochtones (ACC/CCA) since 2013.

Clayton Windatt
Born in St. Catherines, Clayton Windatt has lived in the Northeastern region of Ontario for most of his life and is a Métis Multi-artist. After previously working as Director of the White Water Gallery Artist-Run for 7 years he now works as Interim Director of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and as an independent curator. Clayton holds a BA in Fine Art from Nipissing University and received his Graphic Design certification from Canadore College. He works actively with several arts organizations locally, provincially and nationally on committees and boards of directors including working with the National Arts Service Organization planning committee, Visual Arts Alliance and CARFAC Ontario. Clayton maintains contracted positions with various theatre programs and works as a writer for the North Bay Nipissing News, Muskrat magazine and Dispatch magazine. He works with the ON THE EDGE fringe festival, is a mentor member of the Future In Safe Hands Collective and currently works with Business for the Arts as a Mentor for their ArtsVest program. He aids Aanmitaagzi with their different community arts events and contributes actively as a writer, designer, curator, performer, theatre technician, consultant and is an active visual and media artist.

Ryan Rice
Ryan Rice is the Delaney Chair of OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture program. Before coming to OCAD U in 2014, Rice was a curator at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe. He has worked for the past 20 years within the museum/art gallery milieu at the Iroquois Indian Museum, Howes Cave; Canadian Museum of Civilization, Gatineau; Indian Art Centre (DIAND) and Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa; as well as Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff. He is a co-founder /coordinator of Nation To Nation, a First Nations artist collective, and co-founder and chair of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective (ACC). Over the years, Rice toured his exhibitions across Canada, and in 2008 toured ANTHEM: Perspectives on Home and Native Land and Oh So Iroquois, to Lethbridge, Toronto and Montréal. He received an MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York, a BFA from Concordia University, Montréal and an Associate of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe. He is a Mohawk of Kahnawake, Quebec.

Aboriginal Curatorial Collective
www.acc-cca.com
The Aboriginal Curatorial Collective / Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA) is a national arts service organization that supports, promotes and advocates on behalf of Canadian and international Aboriginal curators, critics, artists and representatives of arts and cultural organizations. The ACC/CCA develops and disseminates curatorial practices, innovative research and critical discourses on Aboriginal arts and culture. By fostering collaboration and exchange the ACC/CCA builds an equitable space for the Aboriginal intellectual and artistic community.

Indigenous Visual Culture Program
www.ocadu.ca/academics/undergraduate/indigenous-visual-culture.htm
The Indigenous Visual Culture program at OCAD University combines practice-specific and interdisciplinary studio-based learning, and courses in the visual, cultural, social and political history of Indigenous peoples.

Onsite Gallery
www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Onsite Gallery, OCAD University’s public gallery and experimental curatorial platform for art, design and digital media, fosters social and cultural transformations. In preparation for the launch of Onsite Gallery's new location in May 2017, our 2016 ONSITE/ programming imagines and creates what a public gallery can be.

Onsite Gallery’s education program is generously supported by Nexus Investment Management.



Event poster
DateSaturday, March 5, 2016 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Phone

416-977-6000, Ext. 456

Cost

FREE

Email

onsite@ocadu.ca

Website

http://www.facebook.com/events/1739135719651011/

Location

OCAD University’s Central Hall 100 McCaul St., Second Floor, Room 230

OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
OCAD University orientation and welcome
The Joint Futures conference is inspired by the pressing needs of our profession to become more mature, inclusive & business-minded. We aim to view design holistically through different macro and micro lenses.
OCAD University orientation and welcome
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Saturday, March 5, 2016 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

ONSITE/incite/inquire: 10 Years, 10 Questions with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA)

Speakers: Dayna Danger and Clayton Windatt
Moderator: Ryan Rice, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University

The Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD University and Onsite Gallery are pleased to present members of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective in 10 Years, 10 Questions.

Onsite Gallery’s 2016 ONSITE/ program investigates how we stimulate change through public platforms outside the gallery. Through an open conversation with the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA), we will address current trends in Indigenous Curatorial Practice and the impact ACC/CCA signifies over the last 10 years.

10 Years, 10 Questions will incite audiences to inquire into the present effects of past efforts.

Event is FREE, all are welcome
The space is wheelchair accessible through use of elevators from the ground floor
Refreshments will be provided by Tea n Bannock, courtesy of Onsite Gallery 

Dayna Danger
Dayna Danger is an emerging Queer, Metis/Ojibway/Polish artist raised in Winnipeg, MB. Utilizing photography, sculpture, and video, Danger's practice questions the line between empowerment and objectification by claiming space with her human scale work. Co-opting the visual language of fashion and pornography, she repurposes and challenges perceptions of power, gender, performativity, representation, sexuality, and mixed identities. Danger is currently based in Montreal, QC while obtaining her Graduate degree in Studio Arts from Concordia University. She graduated with her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) from The University of Manitoba’s School of Art in 2010. Danger held a Visual Arts Studio Work Study at the Banff Centre and participated in Candice Hopkins and Raven Chacon’s thematic residency, Trading Post. In 2012-2013 Danger was mentored by Amber-Dawn Bear Robe and Daina Warren, as part of MAWA’s (Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art) Foundation Mentorship Program. Her work was displayed at the New Mexico Museum of Art's exhibition, New Native Photography 2011, for Santa Fe’s Indian Market in Santa Fe, NM. Danger’s first solo exhibition, Big’Uns, was shown at Urban Shaman gallery in Winnipeg MB, June 2014. Danger currently serves as a board member for the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective/ Collectif des Conservateurs Autochtones (ACC/CCA) since 2013.

Clayton Windatt
Born in St. Catherines, Clayton Windatt has lived in the Northeastern region of Ontario for most of his life and is a Métis Multi-artist. After previously working as Director of the White Water Gallery Artist-Run for 7 years he now works as Interim Director of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and as an independent curator. Clayton holds a BA in Fine Art from Nipissing University and received his Graphic Design certification from Canadore College. He works actively with several arts organizations locally, provincially and nationally on committees and boards of directors including working with the National Arts Service Organization planning committee, Visual Arts Alliance and CARFAC Ontario. Clayton maintains contracted positions with various theatre programs and works as a writer for the North Bay Nipissing News, Muskrat magazine and Dispatch magazine. He works with the ON THE EDGE fringe festival, is a mentor member of the Future In Safe Hands Collective and currently works with Business for the Arts as a Mentor for their ArtsVest program. He aids Aanmitaagzi with their different community arts events and contributes actively as a writer, designer, curator, performer, theatre technician, consultant and is an active visual and media artist.

Ryan Rice
Ryan Rice is the Delaney Chair of OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture program. Before coming to OCAD U in 2014, Rice was a curator at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe. He has worked for the past 20 years within the museum/art gallery milieu at the Iroquois Indian Museum, Howes Cave; Canadian Museum of Civilization, Gatineau; Indian Art Centre (DIAND) and Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa; as well as Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff. He is a co-founder /coordinator of Nation To Nation, a First Nations artist collective, and co-founder and chair of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective (ACC). Over the years, Rice toured his exhibitions across Canada, and in 2008 toured ANTHEM: Perspectives on Home and Native Land and Oh So Iroquois, to Lethbridge, Toronto and Montréal. He received an MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York, a BFA from Concordia University, Montréal and an Associate of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe. He is a Mohawk of Kahnawake, Quebec.

Aboriginal Curatorial Collective
www.acc-cca.com
The Aboriginal Curatorial Collective / Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC/CCA) is a national arts service organization that supports, promotes and advocates on behalf of Canadian and international Aboriginal curators, critics, artists and representatives of arts and cultural organizations. The ACC/CCA develops and disseminates curatorial practices, innovative research and critical discourses on Aboriginal arts and culture. By fostering collaboration and exchange the ACC/CCA builds an equitable space for the Aboriginal intellectual and artistic community.

Indigenous Visual Culture Program
www.ocadu.ca/academics/undergraduate/indigenous-visual-culture.htm
The Indigenous Visual Culture program at OCAD University combines practice-specific and interdisciplinary studio-based learning, and courses in the visual, cultural, social and political history of Indigenous peoples.

Onsite Gallery
www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Onsite Gallery, OCAD University’s public gallery and experimental curatorial platform for art, design and digital media, fosters social and cultural transformations. In preparation for the launch of Onsite Gallery's new location in May 2017, our 2016 ONSITE/ programming imagines and creates what a public gallery can be.

Onsite Gallery’s education program is generously supported by Nexus Investment Management.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University’s Central Hall 100 McCaul St., Second Floor, Room 230
Website: 
http://www.facebook.com/events/1739135719651011/
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000, Ext. 456
Cost: 
FREE
Event poster
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