2012 CADN Graduate Student Conference and Art Exhibition: Art & Struggle


2012 CADN Graduate Student Conference

 
DateThursday, March 8, 2012 - 12:30pm to Friday, March 9, 2012 - 7:00pm

Location

OCAD University

PDF icon Art & Struggle: Conference SchedulePDF icon Art & Struggle: Exhibition

ART & STRUGGLE

Graduate Student Conference and Art Exhibition

Presented by the MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories

March 8-9, 2012


OCAD University


100 McCaul Street, Rooms 190 & 230


Toronto, ON, M5T 1W1

The term “struggle” contains both liberating and oppressive connotations. The resulting tension has long been considered an inherent aspect of art production. Struggle manifests in various forms, whether political, cultural, economic, or personal. While the “struggling artist” has been a problematic art historical trope, this symposium seeks to revisit the issue of struggle in an unromanticized, contemporary vein.

Keynote Speaker: Kirsty Robertson

Capitalist Cocktails and Moscow Mules: Protest in the Museum and Gallery

Friday, March 9, 2012, 6:00 pm


Room 230, 100 McCaul St.

This talk looks at the relationship between contemporary art and protest. Are art exhibitions used to discipline dissent? Certainly that is the accepted view amongst many artists, activists and scholars, who argue that exhibitions of protest art might echo the issues of the protest, but they do so in “contexts without consequence.” A number of curators have recently tried something new, staging art exhibitions in the midst of large-scale protests as a way of potentially avoiding the institutional depoliticizing logic of the museum or gallery. The analysis is focused on a number of exhibitions and events, among them a PR event, “Massive Uprising,” held at the AGO in 2009 and, in contrast, two exhibitions, “Art Goes to Heiligendamm,” organized for anti-G8 protests, and “RETHINK,” held amid the COP15 negotiations in Copenhagen. Do the power relationships change if political or activist art is showcased outside of the institution? I conclude that the three examples mentioned here were ultimately unsuccessful in their aims, but that they nevertheless raise important questions regarding the role art might play in protest or oppositional action.

Kirsty Robertson is an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art and Museum Studies at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on activism, visual culture, and changing economies. She has published widely on the topic and is currently finishing her book Tear Gas Epiphanies: New Economies of Protest, Vision, and Culture in Canada. More recently, she has turned her attention to the study of wearable technologies, immersive environments, and the potential overlap(s) between textiles and technologies. She considers these issues within the framework of globalization, activism, and burgeoning “creative economies.” Her co-edited volume, Imagining Resistance: Visual Culture and Activism in Canada, was released in 2011.

Art & Struggle Panels and Dates:

Day 1: Thursday, March 8, 2012 (100 McCaul Street, Room 190)


1:00-3:00 pm Panel 1: Feminist and Identity Struggles


3:30-5:30 pm Panel 2: Negotiations of and Movements Through Space

Art & Struggle Exhibition Opening


6:00-9:00 pm 205 Richmond St. West, Graduate Gallery, Ground Floor

Day 2: Friday, March 9, 2012 (100 McCaul Street, Room 230)


9:30-11:30 am Panel 3: Cultural and Collective Memory


1:00-3:00 pm Panel 4: Institutional and Local Critiques 


3:30-5:30 pm Panel 5: Government Control and Resistance


6:00 pm Keynote: Kirsty Robertson

 Art and Struggle

Click above for more photos

The conference committee would like to thank: the CADN first year students, Xerox Canada and the Office of Graduate Studies at OCAD University for their generous support.

 

DateThursday, March 8, 2012 - 12:30pm to Friday, March 9, 2012 - 7:00pm

Website Location

OCAD University

OCADU Graduate students will be presenting their research to advisors, fellow students and the OCAD University Community at large.
Among All These Tundras features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world.
Free public reception of Onsite Gallery's newest exhibition, ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ Among All These Tundras
Open life drawing session offered by the OCAD U Alumni Association
12 Degrees is pleased to exhibit a new work by acclaimed artist Colette Laliberté. From September 20 to December 26, 2019, Laliberté’s site specific installation of three-dimensional works on paper will be on display at 12 Degrees, Monday through Sunday, 10 am to 6 pm. 
Open life drawing session offered by the OCAD U Alumni Association
Join Inuk artist, writer, curator, throatsinger, spoken word poet and Onsite Gallery exhibiting artist, Taqralik Partridge, for a spoken word performance and writing activity.
Piranha, Comic Art and Political Cartoons by the Union Art Service.
Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award-winning poet SONNET L’ABBE returns with her third collection in which a mixed-race woman decomposes her inheritance of Shakespeare.
Legal Intersections is a four-part series addressing legal issues of importance to artists, designers, and cultural workers. The series is presented in collaboration with the Artists’ Legal Advice Services, the Centre for Emerging Artists and Designers at OCAD University, and the Edward P. Taylor Library & Archives at the Art Gallery of Ontario.
Art & Struggle
Thursday, March 8, 2012 - 12:30pm to Friday, March 9, 2012 - 7:00pm

ART & STRUGGLE

Graduate Student Conference and Art Exhibition

Presented by the MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories

March 8-9, 2012


OCAD University


100 McCaul Street, Rooms 190 & 230


Toronto, ON, M5T 1W1

The term “struggle” contains both liberating and oppressive connotations. The resulting tension has long been considered an inherent aspect of art production. Struggle manifests in various forms, whether political, cultural, economic, or personal. While the “struggling artist” has been a problematic art historical trope, this symposium seeks to revisit the issue of struggle in an unromanticized, contemporary vein.

Keynote Speaker: Kirsty Robertson

Capitalist Cocktails and Moscow Mules: Protest in the Museum and Gallery

Friday, March 9, 2012, 6:00 pm


Room 230, 100 McCaul St.

This talk looks at the relationship between contemporary art and protest. Are art exhibitions used to discipline dissent? Certainly that is the accepted view amongst many artists, activists and scholars, who argue that exhibitions of protest art might echo the issues of the protest, but they do so in “contexts without consequence.” A number of curators have recently tried something new, staging art exhibitions in the midst of large-scale protests as a way of potentially avoiding the institutional depoliticizing logic of the museum or gallery. The analysis is focused on a number of exhibitions and events, among them a PR event, “Massive Uprising,” held at the AGO in 2009 and, in contrast, two exhibitions, “Art Goes to Heiligendamm,” organized for anti-G8 protests, and “RETHINK,” held amid the COP15 negotiations in Copenhagen. Do the power relationships change if political or activist art is showcased outside of the institution? I conclude that the three examples mentioned here were ultimately unsuccessful in their aims, but that they nevertheless raise important questions regarding the role art might play in protest or oppositional action.

Kirsty Robertson is an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art and Museum Studies at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on activism, visual culture, and changing economies. She has published widely on the topic and is currently finishing her book Tear Gas Epiphanies: New Economies of Protest, Vision, and Culture in Canada. More recently, she has turned her attention to the study of wearable technologies, immersive environments, and the potential overlap(s) between textiles and technologies. She considers these issues within the framework of globalization, activism, and burgeoning “creative economies.” Her co-edited volume, Imagining Resistance: Visual Culture and Activism in Canada, was released in 2011.

Art & Struggle Panels and Dates:

Day 1: Thursday, March 8, 2012 (100 McCaul Street, Room 190)


1:00-3:00 pm Panel 1: Feminist and Identity Struggles


3:30-5:30 pm Panel 2: Negotiations of and Movements Through Space

Art & Struggle Exhibition Opening


6:00-9:00 pm 205 Richmond St. West, Graduate Gallery, Ground Floor

Day 2: Friday, March 9, 2012 (100 McCaul Street, Room 230)


9:30-11:30 am Panel 3: Cultural and Collective Memory


1:00-3:00 pm Panel 4: Institutional and Local Critiques 


3:30-5:30 pm Panel 5: Government Control and Resistance


6:00 pm Keynote: Kirsty Robertson

 Art and Struggle

Click above for more photos

The conference committee would like to thank: the CADN first year students, Xerox Canada and the Office of Graduate Studies at OCAD University for their generous support.

 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University
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