Forest Therapy at High Park


A  three-hour guided activity and discussion, led by Carolynne Crawley, will focus on breaking down colonial ways of thinking that separate people from the their natural surroundings, and building responsible and reciprocal relations with the land. This is part of Decolonizing the Land, curriculum development project led by Professor Amish Morrell and supported by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

 
DateWednesday, October 24, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Cost

FREE

Email

amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca

Location

High Park North Entrance

This three-hour guided activity and discussion, led by Carolynne Crawley, will focus on breaking down colonial ways of thinking that separate people from the their natural surroundings, and building responsible and reciprocal relations with the land. Crawley will integrate methods from the Japanese practice of Shinrin Yoku, or forest bathing, with traditional Indigenous knowledge to consider our relations with all beings, and connect with the land through all of our senses.

Carolynne Crawley is a Mi'kmaw woman with African and Celtic ancestry and a forest therapy trainer and mentor. She works as Indigenous Food Access Manager at Foodshare Toronto and is involved in environmental justice and food security. Crawley is interested in sharing her knowledge of traditional skills such as harvesting foods and medicines and has organized a three-month cross-cultural youth program, Teachings from the Land, that focuses on food justice and relationship with self, others and the land, as well as a province-wide Indigenous Food Sovereignty Gathering.

Please wear weather-appropriate clothing, sturdy footwear, and bring water and a snack. This is a low-energy activity, so check the weather and dress so that you will be able to keep warm while walking slowly and standing outdoors. We will meet at the north entrance to High Park, on the south-side of Bloor street, opposite High Park subway station.

Please confirm attendance by emailing amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca.

Unfortunately this event is not wheelchair accessible.

This activity is part of Decolonizing the Land, curriculum development project led by Professor Amish Morrell and supported by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. This initiative aims to explore ways of integrating land-based knowledge into artistic, pedagogical and curatorial practice, for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and faculty.

DateWednesday, October 24, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Cost

FREE

Email

amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca

Website Location

High Park North Entrance

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm

This three-hour guided activity and discussion, led by Carolynne Crawley, will focus on breaking down colonial ways of thinking that separate people from the their natural surroundings, and building responsible and reciprocal relations with the land. Crawley will integrate methods from the Japanese practice of Shinrin Yoku, or forest bathing, with traditional Indigenous knowledge to consider our relations with all beings, and connect with the land through all of our senses.

Carolynne Crawley is a Mi'kmaw woman with African and Celtic ancestry and a forest therapy trainer and mentor. She works as Indigenous Food Access Manager at Foodshare Toronto and is involved in environmental justice and food security. Crawley is interested in sharing her knowledge of traditional skills such as harvesting foods and medicines and has organized a three-month cross-cultural youth program, Teachings from the Land, that focuses on food justice and relationship with self, others and the land, as well as a province-wide Indigenous Food Sovereignty Gathering.

Please wear weather-appropriate clothing, sturdy footwear, and bring water and a snack. This is a low-energy activity, so check the weather and dress so that you will be able to keep warm while walking slowly and standing outdoors. We will meet at the north entrance to High Park, on the south-side of Bloor street, opposite High Park subway station.

Please confirm attendance by emailing amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca.

Unfortunately this event is not wheelchair accessible.

This activity is part of Decolonizing the Land, curriculum development project led by Professor Amish Morrell and supported by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. This initiative aims to explore ways of integrating land-based knowledge into artistic, pedagogical and curatorial practice, for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and faculty.

Venue & Address: 
High Park North Entrance
Email: 
amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
FREE
Ignite Imagination - The Campaign for OCAD U

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