Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo: Michel Thieme


A discussion on the relationship of tattooing traditions to community identity and inclusive culture

 
DateTuesday, April 29, 2008 - 10:30pm

Cost

Free

Email

creeve@ocad.ca

Location

Central Hall (Rm 230) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario

OCAD presents a series of talks called Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo, held in conjunction with the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams, on now at the OCAD Professional Gallery. Getting Under Your Skin examines the relationship of tattooing traditions to the contrasting values of community identity and inclusive culture.

Michel Thieme
Tuesday, April 29, 6:30 pm

Michel Thieme is founder and director of Michel Thieme Tribal Arts, a gallery for Oceanic and Indonesian art in Amsterdam, established in 2000. His interest in Polynesian art and in tattooing led him to be tattooed by Su'u Sulu’ape Paolo, the Samoan tattooing master whose work is at the heart of the exhibit Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams. In conversation with OCAD curator Charles Reeve, Mr. Thieme will reflect on this radical, deeply personal form of cultural cross-pollination.

Neil Ieremia
Presented in partnership with Premiere Dance Theatre/Harbourfront Centre
Saturday, May 3, 2008, 4 pm

Neil Ieremia is founder and Artistic Director for New Zealand’s leading contemporary all-male dance company, Black Grace, which has held a unique position on the world stage for over 10 years. Fusing Pacific Islander traditions and contemporary dance in an extraordinary and dynamic form, Black Grace has become internationally renowned for its artistry, creative excellence and innovation, while also becoming the world's leading exponent of Pacific contemporary dance. Sections of the company's repertoire explore, through movement, the ancient Samoan art of tatau.

Ieremia’s talk is held in conjunction with performances of Short Works by Black Grace at the Premiere Dance Theatre from April 30 to May 3, part of World Stage 2008 at Harbourfront Centre. For tickets and information, call Harbourfront Centre at 416-973-4000 or visit www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstage. Access to part of the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams on view at the theatre is available to ticket holders to the Premiere Dance Theatre at Harbourfront Centre.

Both talks take place at in OCAD’s Central Hall (Room 230), 100 McCaul Street, Toronto. All are welcome; admission is free. Limited seating available; guests are advised to arrive early. For information call 416-977-6000 or visit www.ocad.ca.

Tatau was organised by the Adam Art Gallery at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. OCAD would like to thank the following for their generous support: Urban Primitive Design Studio; The Hal Jackman Foundation; Toronto Arts Council; the Consulate General of The Netherlands; William Jamieson Tribal Art; and several anonymous donors.

DateTuesday, April 29, 2008 - 10:30pm

Cost

Free

Email

creeve@ocad.ca

Website Location

Central Hall (Rm 230) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario

Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 10:30pm

OCAD presents a series of talks called Getting Under Your Skin: From Tatau to Tattoo, held in conjunction with the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams, on now at the OCAD Professional Gallery. Getting Under Your Skin examines the relationship of tattooing traditions to the contrasting values of community identity and inclusive culture.

Michel Thieme
Tuesday, April 29, 6:30 pm

Michel Thieme is founder and director of Michel Thieme Tribal Arts, a gallery for Oceanic and Indonesian art in Amsterdam, established in 2000. His interest in Polynesian art and in tattooing led him to be tattooed by Su'u Sulu’ape Paolo, the Samoan tattooing master whose work is at the heart of the exhibit Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams. In conversation with OCAD curator Charles Reeve, Mr. Thieme will reflect on this radical, deeply personal form of cultural cross-pollination.

Neil Ieremia
Presented in partnership with Premiere Dance Theatre/Harbourfront Centre
Saturday, May 3, 2008, 4 pm

Neil Ieremia is founder and Artistic Director for New Zealand’s leading contemporary all-male dance company, Black Grace, which has held a unique position on the world stage for over 10 years. Fusing Pacific Islander traditions and contemporary dance in an extraordinary and dynamic form, Black Grace has become internationally renowned for its artistry, creative excellence and innovation, while also becoming the world's leading exponent of Pacific contemporary dance. Sections of the company's repertoire explore, through movement, the ancient Samoan art of tatau.

Ieremia’s talk is held in conjunction with performances of Short Works by Black Grace at the Premiere Dance Theatre from April 30 to May 3, part of World Stage 2008 at Harbourfront Centre. For tickets and information, call Harbourfront Centre at 416-973-4000 or visit www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstage. Access to part of the exhibition Tatau: Samoan Tattooing and Global Culture: Photographs by Mark Adams on view at the theatre is available to ticket holders to the Premiere Dance Theatre at Harbourfront Centre.

Both talks take place at in OCAD’s Central Hall (Room 230), 100 McCaul Street, Toronto. All are welcome; admission is free. Limited seating available; guests are advised to arrive early. For information call 416-977-6000 or visit www.ocad.ca.

Tatau was organised by the Adam Art Gallery at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. OCAD would like to thank the following for their generous support: Urban Primitive Design Studio; The Hal Jackman Foundation; Toronto Arts Council; the Consulate General of The Netherlands; William Jamieson Tribal Art; and several anonymous donors.

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall (Rm 230) 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
creeve@ocad.ca
Cost: 
Free
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