Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking


Aimee Lee researched Korean paper arts as a Fulbright fellow and built the first Korean papermaking studio in North America

 
DateFriday, November 29, 2013

Location

Central Hall, Room 230 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario

With visiting artist Aimee Lee

Korean papermaking has a history almost as long as papermaking itself. Korean paper, known as hanji, is made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree, renowned for its long and strong fibers. This makes hanji ideal for an array of applications, from uses in the home and studio to experiments in robotics, cuisine, and audio technology. Aimee Lee, the leading American scholar on Korean papermaking and author of award-winning Hanji Unfurled, will share her journey through the history, practice, and use of hanji. These stories will be accompanied by images and videos of her research that depict the current state of Korean papermaking and related arts, further illuminated by samples of hanji and artwork made of this lustrous and durable paper.

Aimee Lee is an artist who works in paper, book, and installation arts. She holds a BA in Visual Arts from Oberlin College and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts from Columbia College Chicago. She researched Korean paper arts as a Fulbright fellow and built the first Korean papermaking studio in North America in 2010 at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland. In 2012, The Legacy Press published her book, Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking, honored by the Eric Hoffer Book Award in 2013. She travels widely to lecture, teach, exhibit, and serve as a resident artist. Visit aimeelee.net for more information.

 

Free

 

DateFriday, November 29, 2013

Website Location

Central Hall, Room 230 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario

Dr. Toon Calders (University of Antwerp) presents Machine Learning: Bias In, Bias Out. Artificial intelligence is more and more responsible for decisions that have a huge impact on our lives. But predictions made using data mining and algorithms can affect population subgroups differently. Academic researchers and journalists have shown that decisions taken by predictive algorithms sometimes lead to biased outcomes, reproducing inequalities already present in society. Is it possible to make a fairness-aware data mining process? Are algorithms biased because people are too? Or is it how machine learning works at the most fundamental level?
Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking
Friday, November 29, 2013

With visiting artist Aimee Lee

Korean papermaking has a history almost as long as papermaking itself. Korean paper, known as hanji, is made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree, renowned for its long and strong fibers. This makes hanji ideal for an array of applications, from uses in the home and studio to experiments in robotics, cuisine, and audio technology. Aimee Lee, the leading American scholar on Korean papermaking and author of award-winning Hanji Unfurled, will share her journey through the history, practice, and use of hanji. These stories will be accompanied by images and videos of her research that depict the current state of Korean papermaking and related arts, further illuminated by samples of hanji and artwork made of this lustrous and durable paper.

Aimee Lee is an artist who works in paper, book, and installation arts. She holds a BA in Visual Arts from Oberlin College and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts from Columbia College Chicago. She researched Korean paper arts as a Fulbright fellow and built the first Korean papermaking studio in North America in 2010 at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland. In 2012, The Legacy Press published her book, Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking, honored by the Eric Hoffer Book Award in 2013. She travels widely to lecture, teach, exhibit, and serve as a resident artist. Visit aimeelee.net for more information.

 

Free

 

Venue & Address: 
Central Hall, Room 230 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
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