labouriously_


A group exhibition including work by alumna Dawn Stafrace

 
DateThursday, June 26, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 13, 2008 - 4:00am

Cost

Free

Location

Loop Gallery 1174 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition by OCAD alumna Dawn Stafrace, Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh entitled labouriously_.

Dawn Stafrace's site-specific installations reflect her interest in line, the hand, the maker and learning through touch and making. Using hand-worked sticks, sometimes whittled from wood, other times formed of clay or paper pieces, she creates three-dimensional linear textures that respond to the architecture of the gallery and reflect her intuitive responses to the structure of the work as it develops. The works are literal experiences of line in space. There is a definite focus on labour in the handmade quality of the works; Stafrace chooses not to mechanise the process so that there is physical evidence of presence left on the work. This is done partly out of the desire for the lines to be organic, showing evidence of the hand, but also as an exercise in labour reminiscent of the production potter in which the marks of the hand visually leaves time instilled within its parts. The fragility of the material highlights the fleetingness of Stafrace's efforts and time.

The idea for the works in Scott Ireland's exhibition initially came from urban telephone poles postered with ads. Ireland's process involves the deconstruction and reconfiguration of the Bible, pulling pages from antique books and stapling them to plywood in the pattern of Renaissance wallpaper. The patterns allude to past Renaissance artists who embedded Christianity into their neo-pagan art. By combining the wealthy Renaissance wallpaper pattern, with the message and physicality of the biblical text, Ireland's work comments on current changes and differences in culture and society. By 'posting' the Bible, Ireland aims to interweave the sacred into the fabric of life and society.

Employing habitual repetition of symbolic and bodily processes, the orifice-like sculptural works in Catherine Telford-Keogh's exhibition are constructed using materials laden with cultural and religious myths of the feminine, such as hair, fur, textiles and natural materials. Through sewing, braiding, weaving and wrapping - actions traditionally ascribed to the realm of femininity - as well as repetitive additive and subtractive methods, each sculpture references the bodily construction of the gendered self. Drawing upon a drag and camp aesthetic, she uses over-the-top materials to reveal the performative nature of femininity. The work focuses on revealing and disrupting the repetitive and idealized acts that intelligibly feminize the body. The blatant visibility of these obsessively repeated acts, the oddity of the objects as well as the overt feminine material reveal gender as a pariodic performance rather than something innate and abiding.

Dawn Stafrace is a graduate of OCAD and Sheridan College, and completed her Master's degree in the University of Waterloo's Fine Arts Studio program in 2007. She is currently a resident artist at the Living Arts Centre in Mississauga. Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh are 2008 graduates of the Bachelor of Arts, Fine Arts Studio program at University of Waterloo.

DateThursday, June 26, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 13, 2008 - 4:00am

Cost

Free

Website Location

Loop Gallery 1174 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario

Laboriously3
Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 4:00am to Sunday, July 13, 2008 - 4:00am

Loop Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition by OCAD alumna Dawn Stafrace, Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh entitled labouriously_.

Dawn Stafrace's site-specific installations reflect her interest in line, the hand, the maker and learning through touch and making. Using hand-worked sticks, sometimes whittled from wood, other times formed of clay or paper pieces, she creates three-dimensional linear textures that respond to the architecture of the gallery and reflect her intuitive responses to the structure of the work as it develops. The works are literal experiences of line in space. There is a definite focus on labour in the handmade quality of the works; Stafrace chooses not to mechanise the process so that there is physical evidence of presence left on the work. This is done partly out of the desire for the lines to be organic, showing evidence of the hand, but also as an exercise in labour reminiscent of the production potter in which the marks of the hand visually leaves time instilled within its parts. The fragility of the material highlights the fleetingness of Stafrace's efforts and time.

The idea for the works in Scott Ireland's exhibition initially came from urban telephone poles postered with ads. Ireland's process involves the deconstruction and reconfiguration of the Bible, pulling pages from antique books and stapling them to plywood in the pattern of Renaissance wallpaper. The patterns allude to past Renaissance artists who embedded Christianity into their neo-pagan art. By combining the wealthy Renaissance wallpaper pattern, with the message and physicality of the biblical text, Ireland's work comments on current changes and differences in culture and society. By 'posting' the Bible, Ireland aims to interweave the sacred into the fabric of life and society.

Employing habitual repetition of symbolic and bodily processes, the orifice-like sculptural works in Catherine Telford-Keogh's exhibition are constructed using materials laden with cultural and religious myths of the feminine, such as hair, fur, textiles and natural materials. Through sewing, braiding, weaving and wrapping - actions traditionally ascribed to the realm of femininity - as well as repetitive additive and subtractive methods, each sculpture references the bodily construction of the gendered self. Drawing upon a drag and camp aesthetic, she uses over-the-top materials to reveal the performative nature of femininity. The work focuses on revealing and disrupting the repetitive and idealized acts that intelligibly feminize the body. The blatant visibility of these obsessively repeated acts, the oddity of the objects as well as the overt feminine material reveal gender as a pariodic performance rather than something innate and abiding.

Dawn Stafrace is a graduate of OCAD and Sheridan College, and completed her Master's degree in the University of Waterloo's Fine Arts Studio program in 2007. She is currently a resident artist at the Living Arts Centre in Mississauga. Scott Ireland and Catherine Telford-Keogh are 2008 graduates of the Bachelor of Arts, Fine Arts Studio program at University of Waterloo.

Venue & Address: 
Loop Gallery 1174 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free
Ignite Imagination - The Campaign for OCAD U

Please be advised that OCAD U hosted events may be documented through photographs and video. These images may be used by the University for promotional, advertising, and educational purposes. By participating in our events, both on campus and off-site, you consent to allowing OCAD University to document and use your image and likeness. However, if you do not want us to use a photo or video of you or your child, please don’t hesitate to let us know when you arrive at the event. You’re also welcome to get in touch with OCAD University’s Marketing & Communications office: communications@ocadu.ca.

Be mindful of those in our community who have scent sensitivities; please help OCAD U maintain a healthy, scent-free campus.