Lyn Carter & Julie Voyce


New work by Instructor Lyn Carter

 
DateFriday, September 28, 2007 - 4:00am to Friday, December 21, 2007 - 5:00am

Cost

Free

Email

kag.cbg@usask.ca

Location

Kenderdine Art Gallery 51 Campus DriveUniversity of Saskatchewan, Toronto, Ontario

Toronto artist Julie Voyce has been developing her current series of abstract screen prints since 2000. Her challenge was to produce an entire body of work using the same three colours (transparent cyan / orange / black). Each abstract print was resolved using only two or three colours. Pre-computer paste-up drawings and repeatedly photo copied images are used to construct the images which are then printed. With precise orchestration Voyce deploys her deliberately limited pallette to read as rich, complex and varied compositions.
Lyn Carter's work disguises commonly found objects with carefully selected textiles that act as skins to create new forms with delicate surfaces. Pattern-object relationships suggest a codified language allowing for varied interpretations far from the original object's intended function.
Consistent within each artists practice is the disguising of self imposed limitations in the creation of the work. Where Voyce confines her palette to a maximum of three colours and a specific process of production, Carter transforms everyday objects into fanciful forms that defy recognizable functionality.

DateFriday, September 28, 2007 - 4:00am to Friday, December 21, 2007 - 5:00am

Cost

Free

Email

kag.cbg@usask.ca

Website Location

Kenderdine Art Gallery 51 Campus DriveUniversity of Saskatchewan, Toronto, Ontario

Lyn Carter, Knit 1 (detail), 2003, fabric, fabricated & found objects,  H 57" x W 8.5" x D 5.7"
Friday, September 28, 2007 - 4:00am to Friday, December 21, 2007 - 5:00am

Toronto artist Julie Voyce has been developing her current series of abstract screen prints since 2000. Her challenge was to produce an entire body of work using the same three colours (transparent cyan / orange / black). Each abstract print was resolved using only two or three colours. Pre-computer paste-up drawings and repeatedly photo copied images are used to construct the images which are then printed. With precise orchestration Voyce deploys her deliberately limited pallette to read as rich, complex and varied compositions.
Lyn Carter's work disguises commonly found objects with carefully selected textiles that act as skins to create new forms with delicate surfaces. Pattern-object relationships suggest a codified language allowing for varied interpretations far from the original object's intended function.
Consistent within each artists practice is the disguising of self imposed limitations in the creation of the work. Where Voyce confines her palette to a maximum of three colours and a specific process of production, Carter transforms everyday objects into fanciful forms that defy recognizable functionality.

Venue & Address: 
Kenderdine Art Gallery 51 Campus DriveUniversity of Saskatchewan, Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
kag.cbg@usask.ca
Cost: 
Free
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