Article

GATHER INVITES SCOTIABANK NUIT BLANCHE VISITORS TO PLAY AND INTERACT AT OCAD U

Installation in progress of Stoke by Relay Studio, part of Gather. Photo by Martin Iskandar.
Installation in progress of Stoke by Relay Studio, part of Gather. Photo by Martin Iskandar.

Gather, an independent project presented by OCAD U for this year’s Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, looks at shifting social, cultural and artistic boundaries and the intersections where the natural and the urban overlap. Curated by OCAD U alumna Marissa Neave (Criticism & Curatorial Practice), the installation is an invitation to interact with art in different — and sometimes unexpected — ways.

The annual all-night contemporary art event, held this year on October 5, sees thousands of visitors to Butterfield Park and the Sharp Centre for Design to see work curated and created by members of the OCAD U community. This year’s installation brings together work by four artists and a collective: Marc De Pape; Shannon Gerard; Annyen Lam; Christine Swintak and Relay Studio (Andrew Lovett-Barron, Eliot Callahan, Adam Carlucci and Nick Crampton).

Each piece in Gather requires audiences to interact with it. Neave describes Swintak and Gerard’s work as immersive, while Lam’s requires a more intimate experience of “peeking.” Relay Studio Inc. and De Pape’s pieces are transformed by visitors moving around the space.

“Nuit Blanche is the perfect opportunity to express the playfulness and spectacle in art,” says Neave, who considered focussing the installation on the idea of intervention, but became inspired by conceptions of nature and culture in the artists’ work. “When I started to piece together specific projects, I realized they all played with ideas of nature and culture in different ways. Each of the five artists presents an experience. In some cases, the reference to nature and culture is really prominent; in others, it’s more nuanced.”

Peer inside paper worlds

Lam’s piece in the installation, "Great Good Place," is a series of miniature world sculptures made out of the quotidian material of cut paper and housed in a freestanding wooden structure behind windows and peepholes. “Viewers are invited to enter the work with their own sense of space and scale,” says Lam. “The window/peephole presentation method is meant to dissolve the gallery space from the viewer’s range of vision and to deliver them into the thick of the paper worlds.”

Make a performance happen

De Pape’s "The Chime," was originally part of his graduate thesis project in Digital Futures, but he staged it on a larger scale for Nuit Blanche, with eight channels of audio running all night. “'The Chime' is a responsive instrument, meaning visitors will have an influence on the music. Even if it is not intentional, their presence will impact the performance,” says De Pape. “Either their body heat will cause the temperature in the room to rise and thus shift the composition by a half step, or they will trigger the motion detectors and cast shadows on the light sensors. All these factors contribute to the performance.”

A secret about De Pape’s "The Chime," for OCAD U community members in-the-know is that you can very gently tap the pendulum to trigger different sounds.
 

Learn more about Gather and its five artist contributors

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche listing

Project description and artist bios




Installation in progress of Stoke by Relay Studio, part of Gather. Photo by Martin Iskandar.

Gather, an independent project presented by OCAD U for this year’s Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, looks at shifting social, cultural and artistic boundaries and the intersections where the natural and the urban overlap. Curated by OCAD U alumna Marissa Neave (Criticism & Curatorial Practice), the installation is an invitation to interact with art in different — and sometimes unexpected — ways.

The annual all-night contemporary art event, held this year on October 5, sees thousands of visitors to Butterfield Park and the Sharp Centre for Design to see work curated and created by members of the OCAD U community. This year’s installation brings together work by four artists and a collective: Marc De Pape; Shannon Gerard; Annyen Lam; Christine Swintak and Relay Studio (Andrew Lovett-Barron, Eliot Callahan, Adam Carlucci and Nick Crampton).

Each piece in Gather requires audiences to interact with it. Neave describes Swintak and Gerard’s work as immersive, while Lam’s requires a more intimate experience of “peeking.” Relay Studio Inc. and De Pape’s pieces are transformed by visitors moving around the space.

“Nuit Blanche is the perfect opportunity to express the playfulness and spectacle in art,” says Neave, who considered focussing the installation on the idea of intervention, but became inspired by conceptions of nature and culture in the artists’ work. “When I started to piece together specific projects, I realized they all played with ideas of nature and culture in different ways. Each of the five artists presents an experience. In some cases, the reference to nature and culture is really prominent; in others, it’s more nuanced.”

Peer inside paper worlds

Lam’s piece in the installation, "Great Good Place," is a series of miniature world sculptures made out of the quotidian material of cut paper and housed in a freestanding wooden structure behind windows and peepholes. “Viewers are invited to enter the work with their own sense of space and scale,” says Lam. “The window/peephole presentation method is meant to dissolve the gallery space from the viewer’s range of vision and to deliver them into the thick of the paper worlds.”

Make a performance happen

De Pape’s "The Chime," was originally part of his graduate thesis project in Digital Futures, but he staged it on a larger scale for Nuit Blanche, with eight channels of audio running all night. “'The Chime' is a responsive instrument, meaning visitors will have an influence on the music. Even if it is not intentional, their presence will impact the performance,” says De Pape. “Either their body heat will cause the temperature in the room to rise and thus shift the composition by a half step, or they will trigger the motion detectors and cast shadows on the light sensors. All these factors contribute to the performance.”

A secret about De Pape’s "The Chime," for OCAD U community members in-the-know is that you can very gently tap the pendulum to trigger different sounds.
 

Learn more about Gather and its five artist contributors

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche listing

Project description and artist bios