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Meet Kaia’tanoron Dumoulin Bush

Kaiatanoron Bush

Kaiatanoron Bush

Kaiatanoron Bush

Kaiatanoron Bush

Mohawk illustrator and artist Kaia’tanoron Dumoulin Bush decided to study at OCAD U for the courses offered in the Indigenous Visual Culture (INVC)program. She also chose it for the opportunity to learn from faculty members Bonnie Devine, an Anishinaabe/Ojibwe visual artist; Gerald McMaster, a Plains Cree/Member of the Siksika First Nation curator, author, artist, and Canada Research Chair; and Ryan Rice, a Mohawk curator from Bush’s home community of Kahnawake, QC. “So far my experience has been lovely,” she says. “The opportunities I’ve had since joining INVC have been above and beyond my expectations.”

 

Bush transferred into the program from Dawson College in Montreal, where she received diplomas in Fine Arts and Illustration & Design. Prior to that she worked as a music educator with the Viva! Sistema in Kahnawake, a program designed to create social change for children and youth.

 

Her practice includes illustration, design, painting, sculpture and installation, and her bold, expressive works all feature a strong point-of-view. “My personal work focuses on intimacy and sexuality in societal and personal contexts,” she says. She also draws on her familial background: “A big portion of my research goes into learning family histories and finding ways to articulate those histories effectively.”

 

In addition to doing what she says is “as much drawing and painting as possible” in as many classes as she can fit into her schedule, Bush also does freelance design and illustration. “Up to this point, most of my professional work has contributed in one way or another to community-building and organization within the Indigenous community of Toronto,” she says, noting that she’s also open to fulfilling other projects.

 

One of her past side projects was to design a Mohawk language version of the “Toronto vs. Everybody” shirt. She’s also been interviewed about her work and indigenous visual culture issues for Canadian Art magazine, CBC News and the Toronto Star.

 

Bush says she always carries a sketchbook and drafting pencil with her, and enjoys sitting at her light box and inking something while listening to music. After graduation she plans to pursue a master’s degree with a strong studio practice: “The benefit of having a diverse practice is being able to branch out and work in many different fields,” she says. “I would love to apply for residencies and travel.”

Find out more: kaiatanoron.format.com




Kaiatanoron Bush
Kaiatanoron Bush
Kaiatanoron Bush
Kaiatanoron Bush

Mohawk illustrator and artist Kaia’tanoron Dumoulin Bush decided to study at OCAD U for the courses offered in the Indigenous Visual Culture (INVC)program. She also chose it for the opportunity to learn from faculty members Bonnie Devine, an Anishinaabe/Ojibwe visual artist; Gerald McMaster, a Plains Cree/Member of the Siksika First Nation curator, author, artist, and Canada Research Chair; and Ryan Rice, a Mohawk curator from Bush’s home community of Kahnawake, QC. “So far my experience has been lovely,” she says. “The opportunities I’ve had since joining INVC have been above and beyond my expectations.”

 

Bush transferred into the program from Dawson College in Montreal, where she received diplomas in Fine Arts and Illustration & Design. Prior to that she worked as a music educator with the Viva! Sistema in Kahnawake, a program designed to create social change for children and youth.

 

Her practice includes illustration, design, painting, sculpture and installation, and her bold, expressive works all feature a strong point-of-view. “My personal work focuses on intimacy and sexuality in societal and personal contexts,” she says. She also draws on her familial background: “A big portion of my research goes into learning family histories and finding ways to articulate those histories effectively.”

 

In addition to doing what she says is “as much drawing and painting as possible” in as many classes as she can fit into her schedule, Bush also does freelance design and illustration. “Up to this point, most of my professional work has contributed in one way or another to community-building and organization within the Indigenous community of Toronto,” she says, noting that she’s also open to fulfilling other projects.

 

One of her past side projects was to design a Mohawk language version of the “Toronto vs. Everybody” shirt. She’s also been interviewed about her work and indigenous visual culture issues for Canadian Art magazine, CBC News and the Toronto Star.

 

Bush says she always carries a sketchbook and drafting pencil with her, and enjoys sitting at her light box and inking something while listening to music. After graduation she plans to pursue a master’s degree with a strong studio practice: “The benefit of having a diverse practice is being able to branch out and work in many different fields,” she says. “I would love to apply for residencies and travel.”

Find out more: kaiatanoron.format.com

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