Idea

Peek inside Kaia'tanoron Bush's sketchbook

Photo of Kaia'tanoron

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Photo of sketchbook page

Getting a peek inside an artist’s sketchbook is a pretty cool experience. Sketchbooks show an artist’s creative process and what they’re thinking about.

We were lucky that third year Indigenous Visual Culture student Kaia’tanoron Bush showed us a few pages of her book. “It’s a pretty unique program here”, says Kaiatanoron about INVC. “What really excited me was the opportunity to learn from someone from my community.”

 

This is from a series of paintings that were never finished. Kaia’tanoron took a series of photos of dead birds on the street and painted them. “I like the fragility,” she says. “And, it’s something people don’t want to look at but it’s there.”

 

This process work, featuring rhinestones and nail polish, was for a performance class. The performance was called “Pick Me” looking at the poses people take when picking scabs. The performance was about dealing with self-harm and collage as an alternative.

 

Kaia’tanoron calls this series of sketches Angry Hands. “I have anxiety and I have to draw to get out the negative energy,” she says. Plus, practicing drawing hands requires focus and can take extra practice to master.“Hands are very expressive. They can look angry or gentle,” says Kaia’tanoron. “They mean a lot.”

This is a poster design to raise awareness about missing and murdered Indigenous women.

 

“When I was born my uncle called me an apple – red on the outside and white on the inside,” says Kaia’tanoron. Part of her time here at OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture program has been about digesting her status as mixed-race. “This page is a meditation on being an apple,” she says.

 

 

 




Photo of Kaia'tanoron
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page
Photo of sketchbook page

Getting a peek inside an artist’s sketchbook is a pretty cool experience. Sketchbooks show an artist’s creative process and what they’re thinking about.

We were lucky that third year Indigenous Visual Culture student Kaia’tanoron Bush showed us a few pages of her book. “It’s a pretty unique program here”, says Kaiatanoron about INVC. “What really excited me was the opportunity to learn from someone from my community.”

 

This is from a series of paintings that were never finished. Kaia’tanoron took a series of photos of dead birds on the street and painted them. “I like the fragility,” she says. “And, it’s something people don’t want to look at but it’s there.”

 

This process work, featuring rhinestones and nail polish, was for a performance class. The performance was called “Pick Me” looking at the poses people take when picking scabs. The performance was about dealing with self-harm and collage as an alternative.

 

Kaia’tanoron calls this series of sketches Angry Hands. “I have anxiety and I have to draw to get out the negative energy,” she says. Plus, practicing drawing hands requires focus and can take extra practice to master.“Hands are very expressive. They can look angry or gentle,” says Kaia’tanoron. “They mean a lot.”

This is a poster design to raise awareness about missing and murdered Indigenous women.

 

“When I was born my uncle called me an apple – red on the outside and white on the inside,” says Kaia’tanoron. Part of her time here at OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture program has been about digesting her status as mixed-race. “This page is a meditation on being an apple,” she says.

 

 

 

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