Article

Rosalie Sharp Pavilion Revitalization Project

Open House guests with a model of the revitalized Rosalie Sharp Pavillion
Open House guests with a model of the revitalized Rosalie Sharp Pavillion
Open House guests at a presentation by Bortolotto Architects.
Open House guests at a presentation by Bortolotto Architects.
A detail of the Rosalie Sharp Pavillion model.
A detail of the Rosalie Sharp Pavillion model.

 

The revitalization project scheduled for the Rosalie Sharp Pavilion will turn the building at 115 McCaul Street into a multi-use OCAD U student-focused centre. Benefactors Rosalie and Isadore Sharp are contributing $3 million to the project that, when complete, will re-open in the fall of 2016 as the OCAD University Centre for Experiential Learning. 

According to Peter Sramek, Acting Dean, Faculty of Art, “The plans for the re-purposed Rosalie Sharp Pavilion will see a flexible, multi-use complex which supports student studio production, pop-up events, group collaborations, displays and engagements with visiting artists and designers. This building will be a hub connecting students with local organizations and communities.”

The proposed design opens up, repurposes and recycles much of the existing structure. A dramatic new façade will increase the visual impact of the building and contribute to the aesthetic conversation with the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Sharp Centre at 100 McCaul Street.

The proposed façade, a white metal scrim, would wrap the building and make it appear two levels taller. An intricate laser cut-out design in the façade represents a map of local arts venues. The scrim itself would serve to diffuse heat and act as a shading device while also providing natural light for the artists. At the corners, the scrim appears to peel away to reveal the interior and suggest that OCAD U students’ work will engage the community.

The proposed revitalization addresses environmental, energy and sustainability concerns. As well as recycling and reusing some of the interior materials and the scrim’s ability to minimize heat, light and heat sensors would adjust energy requirements according to whether or not a space is in use.

Working groups are ongoing throughout 2015 to discuss plans for the interior of the building.

Bortolotto Architects, the Toronto-based firm selected for the project, are conducting two open-houses to present their design to OCAD U and the public. The first was held on February 3 at Onsite Gallery. The second one is scheduled for Thursday, February 5, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., also at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond Street West, street level. A 45 minute presentation begins at 5 p.m. 




Open House guests with a model of the revitalized Rosalie Sharp Pavillion
Open House guests at a presentation by Bortolotto Architects.
A detail of the Rosalie Sharp Pavillion model.

 

The revitalization project scheduled for the Rosalie Sharp Pavilion will turn the building at 115 McCaul Street into a multi-use OCAD U student-focused centre. Benefactors Rosalie and Isadore Sharp are contributing $3 million to the project that, when complete, will re-open in the fall of 2016 as the OCAD University Centre for Experiential Learning. 

According to Peter Sramek, Acting Dean, Faculty of Art, “The plans for the re-purposed Rosalie Sharp Pavilion will see a flexible, multi-use complex which supports student studio production, pop-up events, group collaborations, displays and engagements with visiting artists and designers. This building will be a hub connecting students with local organizations and communities.”

The proposed design opens up, repurposes and recycles much of the existing structure. A dramatic new façade will increase the visual impact of the building and contribute to the aesthetic conversation with the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Sharp Centre at 100 McCaul Street.

The proposed façade, a white metal scrim, would wrap the building and make it appear two levels taller. An intricate laser cut-out design in the façade represents a map of local arts venues. The scrim itself would serve to diffuse heat and act as a shading device while also providing natural light for the artists. At the corners, the scrim appears to peel away to reveal the interior and suggest that OCAD U students’ work will engage the community.

The proposed revitalization addresses environmental, energy and sustainability concerns. As well as recycling and reusing some of the interior materials and the scrim’s ability to minimize heat, light and heat sensors would adjust energy requirements according to whether or not a space is in use.

Working groups are ongoing throughout 2015 to discuss plans for the interior of the building.

Bortolotto Architects, the Toronto-based firm selected for the project, are conducting two open-houses to present their design to OCAD U and the public. The first was held on February 3 at Onsite Gallery. The second one is scheduled for Thursday, February 5, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., also at Onsite Gallery, 230 Richmond Street West, street level. A 45 minute presentation begins at 5 p.m.