2013 Common Pulse Symposium

Looking at Art and Disability Differently Disability gives us unique voices and diverse perspectives, the very core of what we expect art to bring to our lives, challenging us, individually and collectively, to expand the way we think about the world and the people we share it with. Disability creates a range of often enriching experiences from which artists make work that is interesting, meaningful, and important and that leads to new insights for both the artist and the viewer. Hearing, seeing and understanding the viewpoint of others is how we grow as individuals and how we progress as a society.

Throughout September 2013, artists working a variety of media will be visiting, performing and exhibiting in Durham as part of the Common Pulse Intersecting Abilities Festival. The festival is celebrating the connections between art and ability and examines alternative approaches to understanding perception and cognition in the practice of artists, particularly artists who address diverse and different abilities and their related experiences.

Hosted by the Durham Art Gallery and organized in collaboration with OCAD University, Common Pulse brings together artists, community groups, researchers and activists to celebrate inclusiveness, accessibility, cultural diversity and artistic excellence.

Artists and Researchers Discuss Art and Disability

The coupling of disability art with emerging research practices allows for a comparison of the values of embodied experience in academic and studio-based activities and a new formulation of their intersection. The hybrid work being done by practitioners, both artists and researchers, describes a further shift away from the centre towards inclusive and experiential processes and results. Methodologies are likewise being expanded that transform the functions of research in ways that makes it more responsive to the complexities of the subject: This fusion of research and creation is evident in the work being done in the fields of art production, Disability Studies and Disability Art and Culture by all of the participants invited to this symposium. Their contributions to the dialogue will address the applicability of a research/creation model in the ongoing effort to bring more light and understanding to our evolving conception of disability and the contributions that disability culture brings to society generally.

Participants

Amanda Cachia, Independent Curator
Emily Cook, OCAD University
Nancy Davis Halifax, Graduate Program in Critical Disability Studies, York University
Michele Decottignies, Stage Left Productions
Jay Dolmage, Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, University of Waterloo
Deborah Fels, Ryerson University
Ju Gosling, Together! Disability Arts and Human Rights Festival
Grahame Lynch, Ryerson University
Geoff McMurchy, Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture Festival, Founder
Geoffrey Shea, OCAD University
Judith Snow, Laser Eagles Art Guild, Founder
Janis Timm-Bottos, Creative Arts Therapies, Concordia University
Jutta Treviranus, Inclusive Design, OCAD University
 

More details:
www.commonpulse.ca

Sponsor(s): 
Event Logo
Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 4:15pm

Common Pulse Intersecting Abilities Art Festival and Symposium 2013

Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 4:00am to Sunday, August 4, 2013 - 4:00am

Call for Submissions - Co-sponsored by OCAD University

Cripping Cyberspace: A Contemporary Virtual Art Exhibition
Friday September 27 – Friday December 20, 2013

Curated by Amanda Cachia with the curatorial committee, which includes
Jay Dolmage, Editor, Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, and Geoffrey Shea, Artistic Co-Director, Common Pulse Intersecting Abilities Art Festival, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada

DEADLINE for submissions: Sunday, August 04, 2013

INTRODUCTION
Cripping Cyberspace: A Contemporary Virtual Art Exhibition
is an online exhibition that will offer a multi-modal, multi-sensorial platform for a crip phenomenology of cyberspace. The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, in collaboration with the COMMON PULSE Intersecting Abilities Art Festival and Symposium, will be hosting the exhibition at its website: http://cjds.uwaterloo.ca/index.php/cjds. The curatorial committee welcomes submissions of (new and recent) work for this online exhibition from contemporary artists, collectives, community builders and can be makers of all kinds in the Deaf and Disability Arts movement. Works should address the main themes of the exhibition and are intended to work in an online context. Documentation of work created for spaces other than the web will not be considered. This unique online exhibition, to debut in The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies in a new experimental format, will offer and therefore encourages submissions like audio description and verbal imaging, language and text such as captions, subtitles and audio transcripts, still and moving image, and sound-based work especially designed and created for virtual display, by artists who explore the exhibition’s challenging questions and ideas in order to crip cyberspace. Artists are encouraged to collaborate as a means to build virtual community and the space will feature a blog to enhance participation from diverse audiences. Artist fees will be paid. The copyright for artworks used in the exhibition remains with the artists.

EXHIBITION THEME
What does a crip intervention in cyberspace look like and how might it inhabit it? How might the representation of disability differ or be expanded online, in the space of a computer screen? Evolving technologies have enhanced access and assistance for disabled people to a new, dynamic level, where they are able to now communicate through computerized voice, text and image. Can cyberspace then, be considered a type of brain, or prosthesis, that provides emotional, intellectual and sensorial support for disabled people? Social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter have also enabled disabled people to participate in an online community that might offer alternative possibilities for both their physical and metaphorical mobility. Crip movement in cyberspace is likely to look, feel and sound different to the everyday social realities of their movement in real time that is often littered with barriers in an urban environment designed for the so-called average person. What are the alternative constraints for disabled people in cyberspace, and what kinds of crip artistic interpretations can fill out these spaces in order to make new meaning? The pulse of technology is one that continues to migrate our now posthuman/machine bodies – all bodies – to realms where our embodiments and our senses develop new relationships with space. What might the virtual realm offer disability aesthetics? The body’s exteriority and interiority becomes usefully abstracted or ‘common’ in its difference, through the filter of technological apparatuses. This effectively moves us away from binaries, such as disability/ability, and instead focuses on a phenomenology of cyberspace, which in turn provides a new language and code for complex embodiment.
Modes of conventional sensorial access that are occasionally found in a museum setting, such as audio description, audio transcripts or captions, will be offered in this online exhibition, where they will not only continue to function as dynamic modes of interpretation and communication, but they also become independent works of art in themselves, which carry their own weight and space in this virtual crip architecture.

IMPORTANT DATES
Proposals must be received by SUNDAY AUGUST 4, 2013.

Notification of acceptance will be distributed by MONDAY AUGUST 12, 2013.

Final successful artworks must be delivered as digital files by MONDAY SEPTEMBER 2, 2013.

The exhibition will be launched on The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies website on the same date as the launch of the Common Pulse Intersecting Abilities Art Festival on FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 27, 2013. The exhibition will be presented for a three month period (until FRIDAY DECEMBER 20, 2013), documented, and subsequently archived online by the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies and the Common Pulse Art Festival.

ABOUT THE CURATOR
Amanda Cachia
is an independent curator from Sydney, Australia and is currently completing her PhD in Art History, Theory & Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation will focus on the intersection of disability and contemporary art. She held the position Director/Curator of the Dunlop Art Gallery in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada from 2007-2010, and has curated approximately 30 exhibitions over the last ten years in various cities across the USA, England, Australia and Canada. Cripping Cyberspace: A Contemporary Virtual Art Exhibition will be her first online curatorial project.

 

www.commonpulse.ca/exhibitions-cripping.php

Common Pulse: Symposium

 Common Pulse: Symposium
Friday, September 27, 2013 - 1:00pm

Collaboration and Inclusion

Jutta Treviranus
Deb Fels
Janis Timm-Bottos
Judith Snow
Discussion

Artists and Researchers Discuss Art and Disability

The coupling of disability art with emerging research practices allows for a comparison of the values of embodied experience in academic and studio-based activities and a new formulation of their intersection.
The hybrid work being done by practitioners, both artists and researchers, describes a further shift away from the centre towards inclusive and experiential processes and results. Methodologies are likewise being expanded that transform the functions of research in ways that makes it more responsive to the complexities of the subject. This fusion of research and creation is evident in the work being done in the fields of art production, Disability Studies and Disability Art and Culture by all of the participants invited to the symposium. Their contributions to the dialogue will address the applicability of a research/creation model in the ongoing effort to bring more light and understanding to our evolving conception of disability and the contributions that disability culture brings to society generally.

Jutta Treviranus, Inclusive Design, OCAD University

Outside-In

Our economic, social and physical survival depends on diversity. Inequity and disparity of opportunity erodes our social cohesion, health and wealth. However, we rarely design our systems and practices for diversity and inclusion. The margins encompass us all. Our design should begin at the margins for a healthier, wealthier and wiser society. This session will explore current disruptions brought about by global networks, pull markets, mass customization systems, cloud services and pervasive technologies that provide opportunities to support greater diversity and inclusion.

Deborah Fels, Ryerson University

Vibrotactility as a Viable Method for Creating More Inclusive Music

In this presentation creating vibrotactile music will be discussed as a theoretical and practical method of inclusive entertainment, particularly for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. A set of tactile instruments, Vibromotion and Vibrochord, as well as a vibrotactile display, the Emoti-Chair, will be presented and demonstrated. Vibrotactility is not only a new accessible art form but it is also allowing new media artists to explore a completely new genre.

Janis Timm-Bottos, Creative Arts Therapies, Concordia University

When Being the Audience is Not Enough: Becoming the "Loving Third"

This presentation will address how a storefront classroom/studio brings together diverse individuals who serve as social supports for each other in order to create meaningful community life. Kristeva's notion of "the loving third" or "the loving support of the social" (in Oliver, 2002) helps us to think about how a sense of belonging through the arts can counteract alienation that has been imposed by values of the dominant culture. Watkins and Shulman's (2008) "liberation arts" demonstrate how individual and groups limit situations that can be re-imagined through sustained studio relationships, fostering a greater sense of wellbeing, as well as positively influencing an entire community's sense of hope. Folk art methods of interaction, such as: "the third hand," "each one, teach one," non-juried community art exhibits and métissage practices will be shared as they are currently being researched at La Ruche d'Art: Community Studio and Science Shop in Montreal, affectionately known as the "art hive."

Judith Snow, Laser Eagles Art Guild, Founder

Inclusion as Valuing Diversity

Inclusion is typically defined as the opposite of exclusion, but this does not capture the richness of the struggle for diverse abilities, cultures and ways of being to find a place in a society where "normal" is fundamental to the design of everything. Art that is created through facilitation challenges what and how we determine value. It provides a context for examining and building partnership and collaboration. Inclusive, collaborative art making stands as a beacon to highlight human capacity against the hegemony of an increasingly robotic, materialist monoculture. This presentation will explain and show examples of making art through cooperation. I will place this process in a cultural context and provide participants with a sense of how working with diverse personal gifts can enrich society for everyone.

 

647-330-2989

 

www.commonpulse.ca/symposium.php

geoffrey@commonpulse.ca

Venue & Address: 
Durham Town Hall 185 George Street West Durham, Ontario

Common Pulse: Symposium

Common Pulse: Symposium
Friday, September 27, 2013 - 5:30pm

Creation and Research

Emily Cook
Grahame Lynch
Nancy D-Halifax
Kim Jackson
Discussionn

Artists and Researchers Discuss Art and Disability

The coupling of disability art with emerging research practices allows for a comparison of the values of embodied experience in academic and studio-based activities and a new formulation of their intersection.
The hybrid work being done by practitioners, both artists and researchers, describes a further shift away from the centre towards inclusive and experiential processes and results. Methodologies are likewise being expanded that transform the functions of research in ways that makes it more responsive to the complexities of the subject. This fusion of research and creation is evident in the work being done in the fields of art production, Disability Studies and Disability Art and Culture by all of the participants invited to the symposium. Their contributions to the dialogue will address the applicability of a research/creation model in the ongoing effort to bring more light and understanding to our evolving conception of disability and the contributions that disability culture brings to society generally.

Emily Cook, OCAD University
Emily Cook holds a MFA in Printmaking from

Louisiana State University (2008) which she undertook after completing her BFA at OCADU in 2005. Over the past ten years, her work has been included in over 30 group exhibitions in the United States and Canada. Her most recent solo exhibition, Dextrocardia, was presented at Lennox Contemporary in Toronto (2012). Since 2008, Cook has held the position of Sessional Instructor in papermaking and printmaking at OCADU. Her accomplishments have been recognized by nine different awards and scholarships, and her work can be found in both private and public collections, including the Toronto Reference Library Rare Books Collection.

Grahame Lynch, Ryerson University

Experiencing Art: Enhancing Experience for Extended Audiences with Transmedia Communication

For those members of the public whose capacity for direct experience of artwork is limited for reasons of ability or location, the means of exposure to cultural productions is often based in descriptive practice. This research project proposes a communication strategy aimed at enhancing public engagement and connecting audiences through nuanced multi-modal experiences. This transmedia model does not attempt to recreate the direct experience of an artwork; rather it encourages the development and sharing of new and highly individualized experiences that are accessible to members of the public with a diverse range of abilities.

Nancy Davis Halifax, Graduate Program in Critical Disability Studies, York University

Disability as Difficult Knowledge: A
Phenomenology of Undecidability

"Disability as undecidability is deeply unsettling to the cultural imaginary, particularly one that incorporates an image of the embodied self as whole, separate and invulnerable." - Shildrick, 763
The artist's embodiment of disability as "undecidability" unsettles and leaks through a cultural imaginary that requests a whole, separate and invulnerable embodiment. How does uncertain or undecidable embodiment effect artistic production? The proposed presentation addresses ordinary experiences of disability embodiment and their effects on the practices of art within community when they are made explicit.

 

647-330-2989

 

www.commonpulse.ca/symposium.php

geoffrey@commonpulse.ca

Venue & Address: 
Durham Town Hall 185 George Street West Durham, Ontario

Common Pulse

Common Pulse
Saturday, September 7, 2013 - 4:00am to Sunday, September 29, 2013 - 4:00am

Arts & Disability Festival Co-Sponsored by OCAD University

Looking at Art and Disability Differently Disability gives us unique voices and diverse perspectives, the very core of what we expect art to bring to our lives, challenging us, individually and collectively, to expand the way we think about the world and the people we share it with. Disability creates a range of often enriching experiences from which artists make work that is interesting, meaningful, and important and that leads to new insights for both the artist and the viewer. Hearing, seeing and understanding the viewpoint of others is how we grow as individuals and how we progress as a society.

Throughout September, artists working a variety of media will be visiting, performing and exhibiting in Durham as part of the Common Pulse Arts & Disability Festival. The festival is celebrating the intersection between art and ability and examines alternative approaches to understanding perception and cognition in the practice of artists, particularly artists who address diverse and different abilities and their related experiences.

Hosted by the Durham Art Gallery and organized in collaboration with OCAD University, Common Pulse brings together artists, community groups, researchers and activists to celebrate inclusiveness, accessibility, cultural diversity and artistic excellence.

This year's festival showcases art and promotes inclusion through exhibitions, artist residencies, multi-disciplinary performances, film presentations and a symposium. The month-long festival will engage visitors through creative workshops, mentorships, artists' talks and educational programs.

The Common Pulse Arts & Disability Festival seeks to engage artists and their practices on their own terms: to contextualize their work in ways that are meaningful to them and illuminating for the viewers, and which celebrates and deepens appreciation for different modes of seeing, thinking and being as an artist. It provides an opportunity to appreciate and celebrate the powerful contributions of individuals who have different experiences and different perspectives on society, life and art.

Artists and Researchers Discuss Art and Disability
The coupling of disability art with emerging research practices allows for a comparison of the values of embodied experience in academic and studio-based activities and a new formulation of their intersection. The hybrid work being done by practitioners, both artists and researchers, describes a further shift away from the centre towards inclusive and experiential processes and results. Methodologies are likewise being expanded that transform the functions of research in ways that makes it more responsive to the complexities of the subject: This fusion of research and creation is evident in the work being done in the fields of art production, Disability Studies and Disability Art and Culture by all of the participants invited to this symposium. Their contributions to the dialogue will address the applicability of a research/creation model in the ongoing effort to bring more light and understanding to our evolving conception of disability and the contributions that disability culture brings to society generally.

Participants:
Amanda Cachia, Independent Curator

Emily Cook, OCAD University

Nancy Davis Halifax, Graduate Program in Critical Disability Studies, York University

Michele Decottignies, Stage Left Productions

Jay Dolmage, Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, University of Waterloo

Deborah Fels, Ryerson University

Ju Gosling, Together! Disability Arts and Human Rights Festival

Grahame Lynch, Ryerson University

Geoff McMurchy, Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture Festival, Founder

Geoffrey Shea, OCAD University

Judith Snow, Laser Eagles Art Guild, Founder

Janis Timm-Bottos, Creative Arts Therapies, Concordia University

Jutta Treviranus, Inclusive Design, OCAD University

 

647-330-2989

 

www.commonpulse.ca

geoffrey@commonpulse.ca

Venue & Address: 
Durham Art Gallery 251 George Street East Durham, Ontario

Common Pulse: Symposium

Common Pulse: Symposium
Sunday, September 29, 2013 - 1:00pm

Language Making

Jay Dolmage
Sarah Gibbons
Amanda Cachia
Next Steps

Artists and Researchers Discuss Art and Disability

The coupling of disability art with emerging research practices allows for a comparison of the values of embodied experience in academic and studio-based activities and a new formulation of their intersection.
The hybrid work being done by practitioners, both artists and researchers, describes a further shift away from the centre towards inclusive and experiential processes and results. Methodologies are likewise being expanded that transform the functions of research in ways that makes it more responsive to the complexities of the subject. This fusion of research and creation is evident in the work being done in the fields of art production, Disability Studies and Disability Art and Culture by all of the participants invited to the symposium. Their contributions to the dialogue will address the applicability of a research/creation model in the ongoing effort to bring more light and understanding to our evolving conception of disability and the contributions that disability culture brings to society generally.

Jay Dolmage, Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, University of Waterloo

Disability Space-Time-Economy

This presentation examines a series of disability metaphors that have worked to freeze disability in particular spaces, times, and economies, delimiting possibilities for critique. With reference to Canadian geographies, architecture and public institutions, this presentation will offer new possibilities for remaking public space; with reference to reified myths and histories of disability in Canada, it will remix crip chronologies; and, with reference to the late-capitalist values for non-normative bodies and minds, it will refigure the productive work of disability.

Amanda Cachia, Independent Curator

Cripping Cyberspace: A Contemporary Virtual Art Exhibition

What does a crip intervention in cyberspace look like and how might it inhabit it? How might the representation of disability differ or be expanded online, in the space of a computer screen? Evolving technologies have enhanced access and assistance for disabled people to a new, dynamic level, where they are able to now communicate through computerized voice, text and image. Can cyberspace then, be considered a type of brain, or prosthesis, that provides emotional, intellectual and sensorial support for disabled people?

 

647-330-2989

 

www.commonpulse.ca/symposium.php

geoffrey@commonpulse.ca

Venue & Address: 
Durham Town Hall 185 George Street West Durham, Ontario