Art & Health

As Artist in Residence at Baycrest (2012) Judith Doyle worked with neuropsychologists Dr. Brian Richards and Dr. Eva Svaboda and the clients of Memory Link, a program developing assistive technologies and training for people experiencing memory loss as a result of Acquired Brain Injury.

FUNDING: Artists in the Community and Workplace, Ontario Arts Council

As Artist in Residence at Baycrest (2012) Judith Doyle worked with neuropsychologists Dr. Brian Richards and Dr. Eva Svaboda and the clients of Memory Link, a program developing assistive technologies and training for people experiencing memory loss as a result of Acquired Brain Injury. During the residency, Doyle conducted interviews and worked collaboratively with clients on media montage representing their experiences. The collaboration continued for more than a year and culminated in an exhibition entitled Pathfinding which portrayed the perceptual experiences of memory loss in images combining natural branching phenomenon and scans of neuro-pathways. Pathfinding was installed at Baycrest Health Sciences in a high-traffic, publicly accessible space near the elevators to the Apotex seniors' residence, next to a cafeteria, at the base of a busy elevator and hallway. Composited imagery played on an array of vintage TVs, each with its own soundtrack or "voice". 

The artist collaborators included Doyle and Robin Len, Emad Dabiri and Kang-Il Kim, with sound by Paul Geldart. Robin and Kang have difficulty storing and retrieving new memories (anterograde amnesia) resulting from Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). All of the team are experienced media artists and compositors and drew from this experience, enlisting embodied memory through artistic collaboration. In September 2012, the project relocated from Baycrest to the Social Media and Collaboration Lab (SMAClab) at 230 Richmond West at OCADU. After the exhibition at Baycrest, the work was subsequently presented at the Inclusive Design Institute at OCAD University and at the artist-run centre HAVN (Hamilton Audio-Visual Node) with support from Brain Injury Services of Hamilton (BISH).

LINKS

Worldviews Conference presentation on Memory Link collaboration  at TIFF Bell Lightbox by Judith Doyle 2013 http://readingpictures.com/worldviews.pdf

Feature: Aging in the 21st Century: Judith Doyle & Baycrest http://www.baycrest.org/Breakthroughs/winter2010/Features.asp

Pathfinding Exhibition Opening at Baycrest 2013 http://vimeo.com/60362578

image of works
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Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 2:00pm
Lab Member: 
Judith Doyle
Emad Dabiri

Art and Ability: Cardinal

This project begins to examine the special physical needs of individuals with complex disabilities through the lens of their artistic and expressive needs. It proposes to develop and incorporate an art/research methodology, including stages of creation and analysis of prototypical tools to address these overlapping needs of the participants. It is anticipated that these newly developed tools will have potential benefits for a broader spectrum of the user’s needs, as well as for other users with or without disabilities. This iterative inquiry will take the form of collaborative art creation sessions involving both researcher/artists and participant/artists with severe physical disabilities. Analysis of the impediments to these exercises in self expression will guide the rapid development of new, prototypical, art making tools, techniques or materials. At the conclusion of the research, we will examine the effectiveness of the art/research methodology in refining and addressing the emerging research question of how communication models can be developed and employed for artistic expression by individuals with disabilities, and how they can be applied to their other communication needs.

Cardinal: Eye Gesture Screenless Communication System

Several observations of current eye-gaze and eye-gesture systems point towards the potential benefits of a low strain,computer-assisted, natural tool for users with eye control as their primary means of communicating.

The three existing systems include early Bliss boards, myTobii computers and the Eye Writer. These are the salient features of each:

The Bliss board was a physical tool that allowed a trained user to communicate with a trained “listener” through eye gestures. A 2-3 foot square sheet of clear Plexiglas had the centre cut out, leaving a frame about 6 inches wide. The two conversants would face each other. The square grid around the frame contained cells with a square grid of alphabetic characters. I.e. the top left cell might contain the letters A, B, C, D, E, F, arranged in a grid. The user would use a two-gesture glance to instruct the listener about the letter choice. Up and to the right, followed by up and to the left might combine to signify the upper right letter in the upper left square.

Two features stand out with this system. First, the goal of communicating with a listener is enhanced by having the face-to-face view of the conversants uninterrupted. I.e. they look at each other through the large hole in the centre of the board and glance to the edges of their field of gaze to signal alphabetic letters. Second, once both users have become accustomed to the system, the board itself can be removed and the pattern of eye gestures can still be interpreted.

In its early usage, the communicator is might look at the squares in question, but later they just gesture towards the squares, whether they are physically there or not. This sparks a differentiation between eye-gaze (looking) and eye-gesture (glancing).

The myTobii uses infrared cameras to track the communicators gaze, and maps it to a flexible set of on-screen buttons. The camera and motion tracking software create a very workable tool. Unfortunately the computer screen must constantly be the focus of the communicators gaze, and effectively becomes a barrier between the conversants. In theory, the cameras could track eye gestures that go beyond the edges of the screen. A “pause” feature used to be activated by glancing down beyond the bottom edge of the screen, although that feature seems to be gone.

The Eye Writer glasses uses an eye tracking system that is not linked to a particular on-screen representation. In its fist instantiation it was used with an onscreen software program to facilitate graffiti tagging, but the glasses themselves (the input device) are not linked to any screen, the way the myTobii is.

The synthesis of these systems suggests a model in which a user could use their eyes to gesture towards abstract referents – hypothetical buttons which exist outside of the field of attention. So a user might look at a conversation partner and then glance left and right, which would be interpreted by a computer vision system as the letter D. Right and left might be O. Up and left might be G. But because the communicator never attends to an onscreen representation, they are able to assess the impact of what they are saying, word by word, as we do in normal speech. Rather than having to type out an entire phrase (while ignoring the conversation partner) and then playing it back, with a highly intermediated effect.

In the first test, the object of attention (a Google map) is situated in the middle of the screen, where the user can study it at will without triggering any buttons (which would be the case with the myTobii system). Glancing towards any edge causes the map to scroll in that direction. Glances are triggered by a “mouse-over” effect, which does not require the user to look at, pause on, or otherwise fixate on a button. A simple glance suffices.

A subsequent instantiation will allow the user to wear EyeWriter glasses and look at a physical symbol board to spell words. After rudimentary training, we will test if the user can continue to spell by glancing with their eyes, without the presence of the board.

Further open source software and hardware models will explore if there is a sub-$100 device which could be produced to facilitate communication (and control) without the presence of a computer screen.

 

Publications & Presentations

Alexandra Haagaard, Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: Typing with Low-Specificity Eye Gestures and Velocity Detection. International Workshop on Pervasive Eye Tracking and Mobile Eye-Based Interaction, Sweden, 2013. (under review)

Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Alexandra Haagaard, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: An Eye Gesture Based Communication System. Best Poster Award: Eye Tracking Conference on Behavioral Research, Boston, 2013.

Geoffrey Shea, Nell Chitty, Alexandra Haagaard, Tahireh Lal. Cardinal: An Eye Gesture Based Communication System. Demo and Talk: Disrupting Undoing: Constructs of Disability, Toronto, 2013.

Shea, G. and A. Haagaard. Artists Reflecting on Their Practice and Disability, Ethnographica Journal on Culture and Disability, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, (under review).

Shea, G., Understanding the Work of Artists with Diverse Abilities: Applying Art, Design, Ethnography and Computer Science. Research Rendezvous, OCAD University, Toronto, 2012.

Shea, G., Art and Disability Research. A presentation to the Doctoral Program at SmartLab, Dublin, 2012.

Keywords: 
Creator: 
Sponsor(s): 
Image of an ear
Text about the readers
Image showing poducts
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 4:30pm
Lab Member: 
Geoffrey Shea
Alexandra Haagaard
Tahireh Lal

Fashion & Sustainability with Kate Black & Kelly Drennan

Image of two women
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 9:00pm to 11:00pm

How can we mitigate the social and environmental impacts of a trillion dollar industry? 

Health, ethics and environment interact on a global scale in the fashion industry. Mass-production of fast-fashion garments and toxic beauty products has long been the accepted practice within the arcane affairs of the fashion supply chain. Who is driving meaningful change towards social and environmental responsibility? Join us for a talk by Kate Black, author ofMagnifeco: Your Head-to-Toe Guide to Ethical Fashion and Non-Toxic Beauty, followed by a response and questions from Kelly Drennan, PR and event planner at Fashion Takes Action. 

Kate Black is the founder and editor-in-chief of Magnifeco.com(@magnifeco), the digital source for eco-fashion and sustainable living and EcoSessions®, a global platform bringing together designers, industry and consumers to discuss change. A graduate of the University of Toronto, Kate has lived and worked in many fashion centers of the world and written over 1,000 articles about designers and ethical fashion from her decidedly global perspective. Her book,Magnifeco: Your Head-to-Toe Guide to Ethical Fashion and Non-toxic Beauty, was published in September.

Kelly Drennan (@ecofashionista) is a social entrepreneur devoted to making change within the fashion industry– known for its negative social and environmental impacts including labour, energy, waste, water, and the use of toxic chemicals. Kelly brings her many years of experience as founding executive director of Fashion Takes Action, a non-profit organization that brings social and environmental awareness to the fashion industry.  

Strategic Innovation Lab (sLab) is a centre for research and innovation at OCAD University. sLab integrates applied research, professional engagement, education and skills development to assist private, public, and not-for-profit organizations attain their goals. sLab trans-disciplinary teams draw on the growing SFI community of researchers and practitioners, design and business professionals, teachers and students, who are passionate about creative economies and sustainable futures. slab.ocadu.ca

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University  205 Richmond St. W., 5th floor, Room 510  sLab (Strategic Innovation Lab)
Website: 
http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/fashion-sustainability-with-kate-black-kelly-drennan-tickets-18942526607?ref=enivte001&invite=ODU4NzQxNy9ndmFuYWxzdHluZUBzbGFiLm9jYWQuY2EvMA%3D%3D&utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=invitemodernv2&utm_term=eventpage

Writing in the Disciplines Roundtable

Green poster with black and white text
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 4:30pm to Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 6:30pm

Join us for lunch and conversation

Tell us about your experiences including writing in your course and share strategies and resources with your colleagues.

Wednesday, September 30: Including Writing in Your Course: A Toolkit for Faculty

Thursday, October 29: Strategies for supporting English Language Learners (ELLs)

Wednesday, November 25:Writing in the Sketchbook: A Case Study in First-Year Art

The Roundtables are open to all faculty and staff.

Lunch is provided!

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University  113 McCaul St. Room 510a
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/writing-across-the-curriculum/faculty-resources.htm
Email: 
wlc@ocadu.ca

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Event Poster
Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 5:00pm to 9:00pm

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon workshop at the OCAD U Library. Saturday 22 March 2014, 1pm-2pm tutorial; 2pm-5pm 1-on-1 help and working together.

Wikipedia editing session for uploading entries on Canadian, First Nations, OCAD U women artists.

On February 1, 2014, volunteers gathered around the world for the Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon. The aim of the event was to balance out Wikipedia’s gender gap, adding or editing entries for women artists, who are historically underrepresented. During the event, volunteers added more than 100 women artists to Wikipedia. The organizers of the Toronto satellite event, which took place at Art Metropole, are now teaming up with OCAD U Library to continue the work begun on that day. With access to the OCAD U library’s extensive resources, students and volunteers will be able to work together to continue adding and editing entries for women artists, including Canadian and First Nations artists and artists from the OCAD University community.

Please join us on Saturday March 22, 2014, between 1 - 5 p.m., and bring your laptop! All are welcome, regardless of your level of experience. A beginner’s tutorial will take place from 1 - 2 p.m., and more experienced editors will be available throughout the event for one-on-one help. No preparation or experience is necessary, but we encourage participants to create a Wikipedia account before the event, as there is a limit to how many accounts can be created from one IP address. It is easy to do and instructions are here. Also, join our Facebook event page!

Want to get started on learning how to edit Wikipedia articles, so you can dive right in once you get here? Read this guide for beginners, or try this tutorial for students, which covers the basics.

Not sure which artist entry to add, or whose entry to work on? The Art + Feminism Wiki group has compiled a list of suggestions here!

Venue & Address: 
Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Room 1215, 2nd level 113 McCaul St Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free
Keywords: 

sMarch- Estisol Demonstration in Printmaking Studios

sMarch Event Poster
Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 3:00pm to 3:30pm

sMarch- Estisol Demonstration in Printmaking Studios

Visit the Printmaking Studios(Room 384)for a demonstration of Estisol. Estisol is a vegetable-coconut oil based solvent used to replace toxic solvents in the Printmaking Studios. This event is part of sMarch.

Venue & Address: 
Room 384 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/shops_studios/green_initiatives.htm
Cost: 
Free

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

ART AND FEMINISIM LOGO
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 7:00pm to 10:45pm

Everyone is welcome!

Wikipedia beginners tutorial: 3:00pm-3:30pm; Drop-in: 3pm-6:45pm

Wikipedia editing session for improving representation of women artists (Canadian, First Nations & OCAD U)

Wikipedia's gender trouble is well documented. In a 2010 survey, Wikimedia found that less than 13% of its contributors are female. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. Many articles on notable women in history and art are absent on Wikipedia.

Join us in continuing the work of previous Art + Feminism Edit-a-Thons at OCAD U and across the world, which have added more than 100 women artists to Wikipedia. With access to OCAD U library’s books and article databases, you are invited to help continue adding and editing entries.

No preparation necessary!
Bring a laptop! (if possible)
Please create a Wikipedia account before the event!

(It is easy to do and instructions are here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:GLAM/BeginnersGuide#Create_your_account.

Join the Facebook event

Please RSVP to artfemwikiATgmail.com and indicate whether you will attend the tutorial.

Want to get started right away? Try this tutorial for students, which covers the basics.

Venue & Address: 
Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Room 1215, Level 2 113 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free
Keywords: 

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Logo with female symbol and hand holding a paint brush
Saturday, September 27, 2014 - 6:00pm to 9:45pm

Everyone is welcome!

Wikipedia beginners' tutorial: 2pm-2:30pm; Drop-in: 2pm-5:45pm

Wikipedia editing session for improving representation of women artists (Canadian, First Nations & OCAD U)

Please join us for our first Edit-a-Thon of the 2014/2015 school year! Learn how to edit Wikipedia articles and help improve the representation of women artists and artists from underrepresented groups on Wikipedia.

Wikipedia's gender trouble is well documented. In a 2010 survey, Wikimedia found that less than 13% of its contributors are female. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. Many articles on notable women in history and art are absent on Wikipedia.

This event continues the work of previous Art + Feminism Edit-a-Thons across the world, which added more than 100 women artists to Wikipedia. With access to OCAD U library’s books and article databases, you are invited to help continue adding and editing entries.

No preparation necessary!
Bring a laptop! (if possible)
Please create a Wikipedia account before the event!

(It is easy to do and instructions are here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:GLAM/BeginnersGuide#Create_your_account.

Join the Facebook event

Please RSVP to artfemwiki AT gmail.com and indicate whether you will attend the tutorial.

Want to get started right away? Try this tutorial for students, which covers the basics.

See you on the 27th!

Venue & Address: 
Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Room 1215, Level 2 113 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free
Keywords: