Amanda Roy (MA, 2014)

Monday, March 4, 2019 - 3:15pm

Amanda Roy is currently Sales Manager North America - ALM (archives, libraries, museums) at Axiell, the number one provider of collections management technology in the world. In her capacity as a Collections Technology Specialist, Roy has worked with some of the largest institutions in the world: the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, National Museum of the American Indian, and National Museum of American History, as well as Canadian institutions such as TIFF, Ryerson Image Center, and the Canadian Museum of History.

Martha Robinson (MA, 2014)

Monday, March 4, 2019 - 3:15pm

Martha Robinson is a PhD candidate in the Interuniversity program in Art History at Concordia University. Her doctoral research is rooted in an investigation of the animal—in particular, visual culture addressing birds and avian life, and how contemporary artists adopt strategies of representation (and species) to comment on issues of climate change and extinction in the so-called Anthropocene. She has conducted extensive research on animal art and collections in Canada and the United States, and is currently writing her dissertation.  Building on her Master’s research, her project engages both posthumanist theory and historic and current practices of representation in the discipline of natural history. Robinson has recently developed and taught two undergraduate courses at Concordia: Art and the Animal: Posthumanism, Visual Culture and Art History and The Art of Natural History and the Politics of the Collection. She has also written catalogue essays for Nicholas Crombach, Jannick Deslauriers and Clint Neufeld at Art Mûr.

Treva Michelle Legassie (MA, 2016)

Conservation Piece for Catastrophe (2017), image courtesy of Treva Michelle Legassie.
Conservation Piece for Catastrophe (2017), image courtesy of Treva Michelle Legassie.
Tel Quel/As Is (2017), Installation view, image courtesy of Treva Michelle Legassie.
Monday, March 4, 2019 - 3:15pm

Treva Michelle Legassie is currently pursuing a research-creation PhD candidate at Concordia University, where she was named the J.W. McConnell Memorial Doctoral Fellow. Examining contemporary curatorial practices for environmental and site-specific art, her dissertation builds on current work calling for a new ethics of care bound to transversal and collaborative relationships between artist and curator, human and nonhuman, object and artist. Legassie is the founder and director of the Curatorial Collective at Milieux Concordia, Assistant Director of the Speculative Life Cluster, and a researcher in the Ethnography Lab and at AbTeC (Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace). She was curator of the exhibition Femynynytees (2018) at AVE, Montreal, assistant curator to Dr. Matt Soar for Tel Quel/As Is (2017) and co-ordinator for Cheryl Sim’s exhibition YMX: Land and Loss after Mirabel (2017) at POPOP Gallery, Montreal. She has published her writing in Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research, PUBLIC Journal, De Gruyter Open Cultural Studies, ALTERNATIVE: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, The Senses and Society, and has presented her research internationally at ISEA and RE:TRACE 7th International Conference on the Histories of Media Art. Recent research-creation projects include; Six Tales of Peace (and War) an audio guide for the Pavilion for Peace at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, which she co-wrote and co-produced, and a sculptural work titled Conservation Piece for Catastrophe which was shown at Concordia University’s Media Gallery in 2017. She has held a research fellowship at the National Academy of the Sciences in Washington, DC, and is currently a part-time faculty member of the Communication Studies department at Concordia University.

 

trevalegassie.com

2019 CADN Graduate Student Conference – Networks of Experience: Art and (Dis)Embodiment

Friday, March 15, 2019 - 6:00pm

Conference concept:

Any encounter between an audience and a work of art is experiential. Beyond this universal dimension, much of contemporary art asks more of its viewers than just viewing.
This conference invites investigations of experience in contemporary art, across its various embodied practices: artists’ lived/personal experience as embodied in their art; the experiences of spectators and audiences; and experience as cultural legacy/history, including experiences of colonialism and decolonization.

keynote:

March 15
Dr. Erin Manning, Nestingpatching 6:00 – 7:30 pm
Auditorium 190, 100 McCaul Street

Erin Manning is a professor in the Faculty of Fine Arts at Concordia University (Montreal, Canada). She is also the founder of SenseLab (www.senselab.ca), a laboratory that explores the intersections between art practice and philosophy through the matrix of the sensing body in movement.
In this talk I bring into relation two practices – Helio Oiticica’s Nests and SenseLab’s schizoanalytic work on the material practice of thresholding. Thinking-with Laura Harris’s work on an aesthetic sociality of blackness, I explore the aesthetic yield in practices that foreground emergent collectivity. With the specter of a pragmatics of the useless always in the offing, I explore the artful potential of processes that orient toward an approxima-tion of proximity and compose with the minor socialities that come alive at this interstice.

Conference:

March 16
9:15 am – 5:15 pm
Auditorium 190, 100 McCaul Street Refreshments and lunch provided

Closing reception & art exhibition:

5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Open Space Gallery, 49 McCaul Street

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/182753752650015/

 

Website: https://networksofexperience2019.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR1s73K46aAr15I5B4yCB0XJ3HqW5z6-wnCYO9ynnnNhufQuaOCDf8SNxV0

 

Eventbrite sign up page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/networks-of-experience-art-and-disembodiment-tickets-55078921537

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 100 McCaul St.
Website: 
https://networksofexperience2019.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR1s73K46aAr15I5B4yCB0XJ3HqW5z6-wnCYO9ynnnNhufQuaOCDf8SNxV0
Cost: 
Free
     OCADU BLXCK ASSOCIATION presents, Black Richness the Untapped Potential of Our Ancestry •     CCP & CADN Speaker’s Series E
Keywords: 

Artist Talk: Abdullah Qureshi

CharBagh (20118), Abdullah Qureshi, mixed and multi-media installation, dimensions variable/exhibited at Uqbar, Berlin
Monday, December 3, 2018 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm

Abdullah Qureshi is an artist, educator, and cultural producer. Through his research and production, he interrogates ways that queerness and resistance manifest within Muslim contexts. Qureshi’s work has been exhibited internationally, and he has held numerous positions at cultural and educational institutions including British Council and the National College of Arts, Lahore. In 2017, Qureshi received the Art and International Cooperation fellowship at Zurich University of the Arts and is currently a Doctoral Candidate at Aalto University in Finland and Research Fellow at the Center for Arts, Design, and Social Research, Boston.

This talk presents an overview of Qureshi's practice, and he will share selected curatorial projects, along with his on-going doctoral research on LGBTIQ Muslim Migrants in Finland.

Presented by the Cotnemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories Program (CADN)

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University RHA 511, 205 Richmond St. W.
Cost: 
Free

Dr. Analays Alvarez: Ethno-cultural Monuments: From Canada to the Web, and for All

The Immigrants, 2000, Sergio Comacchio, Italian Garden (Hastings Park), Vancouver. © Analays Alvarez
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm

Tuesday, April 10, Room RHB 1015,  3:00PM-4:30PM (230 Richmond St.)

Dr. Analays Alvarez is an art historian and independent curator. She received a bachelor’s degree in Art History from the Universidad de La Habana (Cuba, 2005), and a master’s degree in Études des arts (2010) and a doctorate in Art History (2015) from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Cross-cultural and multilingual education and professional experience have contributed to Dr. Alvarez’s expertise in public art, immigrant heritages, and curatorial studies. From 2016 to 2018, she held a position as Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History of Art at the University of Toronto, where she also taught contemporary public art. 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, 230 Richmond Room RHB 1015
Cost: 
Free
Ethno-Cultural Monuments

Unhistories: Art and the Unconcluded

Ukiuktaqtumi, Stephen Puskas, 2017
Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 3:00pm

Artwork on display:
Ukiuktaqtumi, Stephen Puskas, 2017
30:10 minutes, colour

Didactic:
A father picking arctic berries with his daughters on a sunny September day and a group of elders playing dice at a local community centre make up two separable moments bound together by Montreal-based Inuk artist Stephen Agluvak Puskas’s short-film Ukiuktaqtumi (2017). Lyrically stitching together video footage found on the web (each
borrowed with consent from the original videographers), Puskas shapes a wide-ranging view of Inuit life ukiuktaqtumi (“in the North”). In a gesture of endurance, the independent yet woven threads of narrative in Ukiuktaqtumi often begin inside of a moment and unravel without conclusion.

Through these rifts in continuity, Puskas echos the imperative of self-representation for Inuit communities in Canada, whose prolonged subjugation to the colonial lens has fostered inaccurate narratives that call for an unlearning and dismantling of such histories. Ukiuktaqtumi does just this—made in response to non-Inuit filmmaker Dominic Gagnon’s Of the North (compiled of taken footage that constructed a distorted image of Inuit), Puskas presents a selfdetermined
and consenting outlook of life in the North – full of variance, movement, and (dis)/continuities.

~
 

Artist Bio:
Stephen Agluvak Puskas is co-founder and former producer for Nipivut, Montreal's Inuit community radio show. Selected by the Senate in 2017 as an Indigenous Youth Leader, Stephen works to improve Indigenous representation in media and to shed light on the exploitation of Inuit culture like with Ungava Gin. He volunteers for Dawson College's Indigenous Education Council and has also helped write the Inuit chapter of the Indigenous cultural awareness manual for the SPVM. Stephen's film about Inuit self-representation, Ukiuktaqtumi (OO-KEE-UKTAK-
TOO-MEE) recently won the Prix de la Releve at 2017's Presence Autochtone and he is currently an associate producer at the National Film Board, working on the coastal Labrador project, which aims to support Labrador Inuit in producing documentary films.

~

Throughout this exhibition we are encouraging and accepting donations for Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Representational Organization Protecting and Advancing the Rights and Interests of Inuit in Canada.
Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami serves as a national voice protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Inuit in Canada, with a stated vision for Canadian Inuit to prosper through unity and self-determination.
More information can be found at : https://itk.ca

~

We would also like to thank VTape (http://www.vtape.org) for their assistance in organizing the presentation of this work.

Venue & Address: 
Graduate Gallery, 205 Richmond St. W

un-histories: art and the unconcluded

un-histories: art and the unconcluded
Friday, March 9, 2018 - 7:00pm to Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 8:00pm

March 9, 7:00 PM

Keynote by Dr. Monika Kin Gagnon (Concordia University)

March 10, 9:30 AM-5:30 PM

Conference panel presentations from graduate students, artists, and arts professionals from Toronto and abroad, followed by a closing reception at OCADU’s Graduate Gallery

~

Within the term “history” lies a conceptual confinement—the presumption that the topics being written about remain consigned to the past. This conference seeks to counter history’s containment and to foreground its continuing relevance in the present. Through the notion of “un-histories,” conventional limits can be unsettled by prompting critical inquiries into how history functions: by re-organizing the composition of the past, by re-constructing methods of transmitting narratives, and by destabilizing the seeming linearity of events. Un-histories reimagine history as a practice for addressing the “unconcluded”—subjectivities and narratives previously considered spectral, disparaged, marginalized, erased, shamed, abashed, or localized.

Keynote Presentation

Unthinking Expo 67

Dr. Monika Kin Gagnon (Concordia University)

March 9, 7:00 PM, 100 McCaul Street, room 190

Dr. Gagnon will present on her co-curated exhibition À la recherche d’Expo 67 / In Search of Expo 67 (2017) which featured 19 Canadian and Québec contemporary artists taking inspiration from the landmark international event, 50 years later.  Discussing the original Expo 67 in connection to artworks by Althea Thauberger, Leisure, CINEMAexpo67, Geronimo Inutiq and others, Gagnon speaks on the distinct methods of contemporary art offers for exploring cultural history.  Engaging the process of “unthinking” developed by Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, which activates the movement between knowledge, history and media, Gagnon will show how the artworks of In Search of Expo 67 are positioned as vital forms of animating the archive and knowing the past in the present.

Monika Kin Gagnon is Professor of Communication Studies and a Concordia University Research Fellow. She has published widely on cultural politics, memory, and visual/media arts since the 1980s. Her books include Other Conundrums: Race, Culture and Canadian Art (2000), 13 Conversations about Art and Cultural Race Politics (2002, with Richard Fung), and Reimagining Cinema: Film at Expo 67 (2014, with Janine Marchessault). Her media works include the DVD-catalogue and restoration project of her late artist-father’s experimental 1960’s film, Charles Gagnon: 4 Films (2009), and the interactive database Archiving R69 (2011). Currently, she is completing a book exploring posthumous collaborations with filmmakers as a form of creative archiving.

 

~

Exhibition
Graduate Gallery
205 Richmond Street West
Saturday March 10, 2018

Shown in conjunction with the 2018 CADN Graduate Student Conference un-histories: art and the unconcluded, which seeks to seeks to counter history’s containment and to foreground its continuing relevance in the present. Using the notion of “un-histories” to unsettle conventional limits of history by prompting critical inquiries into how history functions, encouraging: re-organizing the composition of the past, re-constructing methods of transmitting narratives,
and destabilizing the seeming linearity of events. Un-histories reimagine history as a practice for addressing the “unconcluded”—subjectivities and narratives previously considered spectral, disparaged, marginalized, erased, shamed, abashed, or localized.

~

Artwork on display:
Ukiuktaqtumi, Stephen Puskas, 2017
30:10 minutes, colour

Didactic:
A father picking arctic berries with his daughters on a sunny September day and a group of elders playing dice at a local community centre make up two separable moments bound together by Montreal-based Inuk artist Stephen Agluvak Puskas’s short-film Ukiuktaqtumi (2017). Lyrically stitching together video footage found on the web (each
borrowed with consent from the original videographers), Puskas shapes a wide-ranging view of Inuit life ukiuktaqtumi (“in the North”). In a gesture of endurance, the independent yet woven threads of narrative in Ukiuktaqtumi often begin inside of a moment and unravel without conclusion.

Through these rifts in continuity, Puskas echos the imperative of self-representation for Inuit communities in Canada, whose prolonged subjugation to the colonial lens has fostered inaccurate narratives that call for an unlearning and dismantling of such histories. Ukiuktaqtumi does just this—made in response to non-Inuit filmmaker Dominic Gagnon’s Of the North (compiled of taken footage that constructed a distorted image of Inuit), Puskas presents a selfdetermined
and consenting outlook of life in the North – full of variance, movement, and (dis)/continuities.

~
 

Artist Bio:
Stephen Agluvak Puskas is co-founder and former producer for Nipivut, Montreal's Inuit community radio show. Selected by the Senate in 2017 as an Indigenous Youth Leader, Stephen works to improve Indigenous representation in media and to shed light on the exploitation of Inuit culture like with Ungava Gin. He volunteers for Dawson College's Indigenous Education Council and has also helped write the Inuit chapter of the Indigenous cultural awareness manual for the SPVM. Stephen's film about Inuit self-representation, Ukiuktaqtumi (OO-KEE-UKTAK-
TOO-MEE) recently won the Prix de la Releve at 2017's Presence Autochtone and he is currently an associate producer at the National Film Board, working on the coastal Labrador project, which aims to support Labrador Inuit in producing documentary films.

~

Throughout this exhibition we are encouraging and accepting donations for Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Representational Organization Protecting and Advancing the Rights and Interests of Inuit in Canada.
Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami serves as a national voice protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Inuit in Canada, with a stated vision for Canadian Inuit to prosper through unity and self-determination.
More information can be found at : https://itk.ca

~

We would also like to thank VTape (http://www.vtape.org) for their assistance in organizing the presentation of this work.

This conference is organized by students in the MA Program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories at OCAD University. Special thanks is given to the Office of Graduate Studies, the President's Office, the Faculty of Art, and the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences/School of Interdisciplinary Studies for their generous support.

Website: https://unhistoriesconference2018.weebly.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/446986352386010/

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/un-histories-art-and-the-unconcluded-tickets-42872521867

Contact: ocadugraduateconference@gmail.com

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, Auditorium, Rm. 190 100 McCaul Street, Toronto Ontario, M5T 1W1
Website: 
https://unhistoriesconference2018.weebly.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/446986352386010/
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/un-histories-art-and-the-unconcluded-tickets-42872521867
Email: 
ocadugraduateconference@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free
un-histories: art and the unconcluded
un-histories: art and the unconcluded-gagnon

Critical Theory Colloquium

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 9:15am to Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 5:00pm

Please join us for the Graduate Critical Theory Colloquium, taken place on December 5th and 6th, 2017. Students will present research papers that address their own research interests, viewed through the lens of one or more texts taken up during the course of the semester in their Critical Theory class.

The presentation schedule is as follows:

 

DECEMBER 5th - Room 510 @ 205 Richmond St. W

10:30 – 11:50 Biopower, Sexuality, Michel Foucault

Lingxiang Wu,  Afaq Ahmed Karadia, Dori Vanderheyden

chair: Erica Cristobal

11:50 – 12:30 lunch

12:30 – 1:30 Jacques Derrida’s Différance

Philip Sparks, Keiko Hart

chair: Roxanne Henry

1:30-2:50 Stuart Hall, Cultural Identity and Diaspora

Kristy Boyce, Karo Castro-Wunsch, Liz Ikiriko

chair: Keiko Hart

2:50 – 3:20 – break

3:20 – 5:00  Re-Orienting Sarah Ahmed

Samantha Robbie-Higgins, Coco Guzman, Vanessa Jackson, Panya Clark-Espinal

chair: Katie Mihak

 

DECEMBER 5th - Room 318 @ 205 Richmond St. W

3:00- 4:20  Psychoanalytical (and anti-psychoanalytical) Theories

Katie Mihak, Juan Escobar-Lamanna Tal Sophia Braniss

chair: Dave Foster

4:30 – 5:50 Karen Barad’s Agential Realism

Sarah Carlson, Rana Zandi, Kirstie McCallum

chair: Karo Castro-Wunsch

 

DECEMBER 6th - Room 510 @ 205 Richmond St. W

10:30 – 11:50 Biopower, Sexuality, Michel Foucault

Lingxiang Wu,  Afaq Ahmed Karadia, Dori Vanderheyden

chair: Erica Cristobal

11:50 – 12:30 lunch

12:30 – 1:30 Jacques Derrida’s Différance

Philip Sparks, Keiko Hart

chair: Roxanne Henry

1:30-2:50 Stuart Hall, Cultural Identity and Diaspora

Kristy Boyce, Karo Castro-Wunsch, Liz Ikiriko

chair: Keiko Hart

2:50 – 3:20 – break

3:20 – 5:00  Re-Orienting Sarah Ahmed

Samantha Robbie-Higgins, Coco Guzman, Vanessa Jackson, Panya Clark-Espinal

chair: Katie Mihak

 

Venue & Address: 
205 Richmond St. W
critical theory poster

1968 now: models, environments, and spatial politics

CADN
Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

 

Dear OCAD graduate studies community: you are invited to attend an end-of-term colloquium for VISD 6004

 

1968 now: models, environments, and spatial politics

 

Room 318, 205 Richmond

Tuesday, Dec. 5 

12:00-2:00pm

 

presenters: 

Roxanne Baril-Bédard

Alessia Pignotti

Brianne Service

Tommy Ting

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University RHA 318 205 Richmond St. West Toronto ON

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