Cancelled: In Conversation with Tanya Tagaq

Photo of artist Tanya Tagaq smiling warmly in colourful dress on a baby blue background
Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

In this free public talk, improvisational singer, avant-garde composer and novelist Tanya Tagaq discusses her bestselling first novel, Split Tooth.

Please arrive early as space is limited to 250 seats.

Wednesday, February 13th, 2019

100 McCaul Street, Room 190

7:00pm - 8:30 pm

Doors Open: 6:30pm

About Tanya Tagaq:

Tanya Tagaq is an improvisational singer, avant-garde composer and bestselling novelist. A Member of the Order of Canada, Polaris Music Prize and JUNO Award winner, Giller Prize Long Listed author and recipient of multiple honourary doctorates, Tagaq is one of the country’s most original and celebrated artists.

Tagaq’s improvisational approach lends itself to collaboration across genres and forms. Her work includes numerous guest vocal appearances (Buffy Sainte-Marie, Weaves, A Tribe Called Red, Fucked Up), original avant-garde classical compositions (Kronos Quartet, The Toronto Symphony Orchestra), commissions (National Maritime Museum in London, UK) and more. In its many forms, from novel Split Tooth to most recent album Retribution, Tanya Tagaq’s art challenges static ideas of genre and culture, and contends with themes of environmentalism, human rights and post-colonial issues.

This event is produced with the support of the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, the Indigenous Visual Culture Program, the Creative Writing Program, and the Delaney Family Foundation.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul St., Room 190
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/681852562211686/
Email: 
folas@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
FREE
"In Conversation With Tanya Tagaq" photograph of Tanya Tagaq smiling warmly and the cover of her novel, Split Tooth

"Too Much Not Enough" by Kaia'tano:ron Dumoulin Bush: INVC BFA Exhibition

Monday, December 3, 2018 - 10:45am to Friday, December 7, 2018 - 10:45am

Please join us for INVC student Kaia'tano:ron Dumoulin Bush's BFA exhibition “Too Much Not Enough.”

 

December 3rd-7th 2018

Ada Slaight Gallery, OCAD University

100 McCaul Street, 2nd Floor

Artist Talk/Reception: Wednesday, December 5th 4:30pm – 6:30pm

 

Venue & Address: 
Ada Slaight Gallery, OCAD University 100 McCaul St. 2nd Floor
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/553689608424908/
Cost: 
FREE
"Too Much Not Enough" scrawled repeatedly in black on a gritty off-white background with a red outline of a dress behind title

You're Welcome

Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 11:00am to Saturday, December 15, 2018 - 5:00pm

A Space Gallery
401 Richmond St. West Suite 110
November 6th-December 9th, 2018

Opening reception: Friday, November 9th 6pm-8pm

The welcome mat, a rug that is placed on the ground in front of one's home, is repurposed by Indigenous artists, Jason Baerg, Ange Loft, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, and Logan MacDonald as a metaphorical device to innitate and locate narratives to place. For You're Welcome, the mat becomes the site of contemplation to address shared spaces, Indigenous presence, the colonial affect and personal/collective relationships to land. Each artist activates their mat as a means to contemplate and illustrate the discourse around land acknowledgement and protocols, which recognizes stewardship, ownership and hints of hospitality. 

Drawn from creative expression and curatorial practise bearing in mind mediative actions, Land is Where Your Feet Touch the Ground (#LIWYFTTG) is a curatorial investigation led by Ryan Rice to examine forms of visual literacy to place through lived experience and collective mappings. You're Welcome is framed as a tangible collective work developed for #LIWYFTTG and is about listening, lookinh, imagining and locating the stories the land will tell us through interpretations by Indigenous artists who navigate Tkaronto on a daily basis.

Communal Biography

Ange Loft, Jason Baerg, Logan MacDonald, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, and Ryan Rice are creative minds who embody the diversity Indigeneity offers. Individually and collectively, they activate and centre themselves on the land - in life, love, creation, and community. 

#LIWYFTTG is supported by the Toronto Arts Council with funding from the City of Toronto.

Venue & Address: 
A Space Gallery 401 Richmond St. West Suite 110
Website: 
www.aspacegallery.org/
Cost: 
Free
Close up shot of Porcupine Quills sticking out of a brown door mat

Free public screening of Angry Inuk

Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 3:15pm to 5:45pm

Indigenous Visual Culture and Culture Shifts present a free public screening of:

 

Angry Inuk

October 4, 2018

3:15 – 5:45pm

Room 190 (Auditorium) OCAD University

100 McCaul St. Toronto ON.

 

A program will follow.

 

In her award-winning documentary, Inuk director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril offers a close look at the critical role of seal hunting in the lives of Inuit, and its importance to their sustainable economies in face of the aggressive and negative impact international campaigns and ban against the seal hunt has on their lives.

 

Angry Inuk (2016) 1 h 22 min

Director: Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, is a producer and award-winning director, whose films include Tunniit: Retracing the Lines of Inuit Tattoos (2010), Lumaaiuuq (2010) and The Embargo Project (2015).

 

OCAD’s Culture Shifts presents documentary media as a catalyst for critical discussions and community action for social change.

 

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/events/461746917656288/

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University, 100 McCaul St., Room 190 (Auditorium)
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/461746917656288/
Poster for "Angry Inuk" film

Richard Fung: Chinese Characters

shirtless man wearing hat
Wednesday, May 3, 2017 - 11:00am to Monday, April 30, 2018 - 6:00pm

Explore the many themes and movements that have shaped Canada’s visual arts landscape since 1968.

Continuing the storylines from the new Canadian and Indigenous Galleries, this special exhibition invites visitors to experience more than 150 works in all media, including sculpture, painting, video art, installation, drawing and photography. From the feminist art movement of the 1970s to present-day Inuit art, the richness of the national Canadian and Indigenous contemporary art collections is on full display. Highlights include Shary Boyle’s work on paper Untitled (the Porcelain Fantasy series), Joyce Wieland’s O Canada, and Brian Jungen’s impressive sculptures inspired by whale skeletons: Shapeshifter and Vienna.

Venue & Address: 
National Gallery of Canada, Contemporary Galleries B101 to B109, B201 to B205 380 Sussex Drive Ottawa, ON
Website: 
https://www.gallery.ca/whats-on/exhibitions-and-galleries/canadian-and-indigenous-art-1968-to-present
Email: 
info@gallery.ca
Phone: 
613-990-1985

OCAD University mourns the passing of Daphne Odjig

Photo of artist Daphne Odjig with colourful fabric
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 6:45pm

Legendary Indigenous artist Daphne Odjig has passed away at the age of 97 in Kelowna, B.C.

Odjig was one of Canada’s most celebrated artists, a painter and printmaker who mixed Indigenous symbols with Cubist and Surrealist images. She joined artists including Alex Janvier and Jackson Beardy to become part of what was known as “The Indian Group of Seven.” Her work drew attention to Aboriginal political issues including colonization, displacement and the status of Indigenous women and children.  

Her family, especially her stone carver grandfather, Jonas Odjig, encouraged her to explore art. In 1963 she was formally recognized as an artist when she was admitted to the British Columbia Federation of Artists.

Odjig is a member of the Order of Canada and recipient of the Governor General's Award in Visual Arts. She received a wide range of honours and recognition, including an Honorary Doctorate from OCAD U in 2008.

Four Points on an Aesthetic Map: Aboriginal Media Art in Canada

Tuesday, May 6, 2008 - 4:00am to Saturday, May 31, 2008 - 4:00am

Presented by Urban Shaman Gallery.

This project seeks to put a context and history to Aboriginal media art practice and provide a forum dedicated to the representation of Aboriginal artists working in the media arts. We have invited three nationally recognized curators to create programs of seminal works by Aboriginal artists, thus creating an online exhibition of Aboriginal media works representing major artists and movements within media arts discourse. The selected curators have produced critical essays and online curator's talks on the impacts and history of media art within an Aboriginal context.

Native artists work from a history grounded in the colonial experience. Yet an aesthetic has developed in spite of cultural oppression and repression that is distinct, vibrant and multi, as well as cross disciplinary. In many ways, the work of Aboriginal media artists can be seen as the outgrowth of a distinctly Aboriginal visual and literary culture. It represents an aesthetic of nexus based on an oral storytelling tradition and the increased participation of Aboriginal artists in visual arts culture.

As more media art finds its way into gallery and presentation spaces, we must examine the place of an Aboriginal cultural specificity. What is important here, is that this is not a dialogue about the formation of some pan-Indian identity politic, but that experimentation in media art by Aboriginal artists challenges control by others of our image and our perception. This is our point of departure.

Curated by Professor Richard Fung, David Garneau and Cynthia Lickers-Sage. Includes work by alumna Rebecca Belmore. To learn more visit the Non-compliance.ca website.

Email: 
program@urbanshaman.org

OCAD University honours leaders in Black and Indigenous art

Image of Dr. Montague standing in front of a painting and bookshelf
Portrait of artist Alex Janvier
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 4:00am

Artist, activist and teacher Alex Janvier and art collector and curator Kenneth Montague were awarded honorary doctorates at OCAD University’s convocation ceremonies on June 10.

Janvier is widely known as a pioneer of modernist Indigenous art with his paintings rendered in bright colours and imbued with spirituality. A survivor of the residential school system, Janvier pursued formal art training at what is now the Alberta College of Art and Design, where he graduated with honours. Janvier’s prolific work has influenced generations of Native artists.

Montague is sometimes described as a “Renaissance man” whose passion for art and philanthropy match his renowned dentistry skills. In 1997, Montague founded the non-profit Wedge Curatorial Projects, which promotes themes of culture and identity in art – particularly within the diasporic African and Black communities – through exhibitions, lectures and discussions.

“It is so fitting for Alex Janvier to receive this degree from OCAD University, which he had hoped to attend as a young man. His amazing body of work, from monumental murals to dazzling watercolours, has made a lasting impact on Canada’s visual culture,” said Dr. Sara Diamond, OCAD University’s president and vice-chancellor. “Kenneth Montague’s curatorial projects explore important issues of identity in art and society, whether in his own home here in Toronto or at galleries as far flung as London’s Tate Modern.”

Bios

Alex Janvier, from Cold Lake First Nation in northern Alberta, is one of Canada’s most acclaimed contemporary painters. His 50-year career is distinctively informed by his Indigenous heritage and modernist abstract painting style. His Morning Star mural painted on the domed ceiling of the Canadian Museum of History’s Grand Hall is seen by hundreds of visitors every day.

Besides being an influential artist, Janvier is a major figure and significant contributor to Indigenous visual culture. He was an art instructor, a cultural adviser and a member of the ground-breaking Professional Native Indian Artists Inc., also known as the Indian Group of Seven. 

Janvier received multiple honours, awards and honorary doctorates; among them, the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts, the National Aboriginal Lifetime Achievement Award and the Order of Canada. This fall, the National Gallery of Canada will present a major exhibition of his work.

In the 1950s, Janvier applied to study at the Ontario College of Art (as OCAD University was then known) and was accepted. Due to government policy, however, he was not granted permission to leave the reserve to attend. On June 10, OCAD University will proudly recognize Janvier’s extraordinary accomplishments and welcome him into the university community with an honorary doctorate.

Kenneth Montague is a Toronto-based art collector and the founder and director of Wedge Curatorial Projects, a non-profit arts organization. Since 1997, Montague has been promoting both emerging and established diasporic African and Black artists via exhibitions, lectures and workshops. His focus is on contemporary art that explores Black identity, and he showcases these works in his Wedge Collection.

Montague is also a practising dentist who graduated from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Dentistry. He has repeatedly been voted "Best Dentist" in NOW Magazine readers’ polls, and his innovative downtown Toronto clinic provides dental care for many artists, designers and musicians. Montague is a founding member of the Association for the Advancement of Blacks in Health Science, and its Summer Mentorship Program for high-school students from African and First Nations communities has become a city-wide success. He has also established the Dr. Kenneth Montague African Diaspora Scholarship at the University of Windsor, where he began his post-secondary education.

Montague has served on the Africa Acquisitions Committee at Tate Modern, London (2012–2015), as well as the Advisory Board of the Ryerson Image Centre (2011–2014) and the Photography Curatorial Committee of the Art Gallery of Ontario (2009–2012). He is currently an AGO trustee and chair of the gallery’s Education and Community Engagement Committee. 

What is Indigenous art?

Michael Belmore, OCAD U's first Indigenous Visual Culture Nigig Visiting Artist talks about what is Indigenous art. Learn more about OCAD U's Indigenous Visual Culture program.

Embed Video: 

Before and after the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes

Before and after the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes
Saturday, July 26, 2014 - 4:00am to Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 5:00am

Featuring OCAD U community members

For more than 12,000 years, the Great Lakes region has produced a distinct culture of Anishinaabe artists and storytellers. The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) celebrates those artists and stories this summer with Before and after the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes, featuring artworks by leading modern and contemporary artists -- including Norval Morrisseau, OCAD U Associate Professor Bonnie Devine, retired OCAD U faculty member Robert Houleas, Michael Belmore, Daphne Odjig and others -- who sought to visually express the spiritual and social dimensions of human relations with the earth.

The traditional home of the Anishinaabe peoples -- comprised of Algonquin, Mississauga, Nippissing, Ojibwe (Chippewa), Odawa (Ottawa), Potawatomi and Saulteaux nations -- the region includes Ontario, Manitoba and Quebec in addition to eight U.S. states and has inspired generations of stories and experiences that are spiritual, political and challenge certain accepted accounts of history. These same sources of inspiration are visible in traditional Anishinaabe arts included in the exhibition, including clan pictographs on treaty documents, bags embroidered with porcupine quill, painted drums and carved pipes, spoons and bowls.

Before and after the Horizon is co-organized by the AGO and the National Museum of the American Indian. It is curated by David Penney (NMAI) and Gerald McMaster (Plains Cree/Sisika First Nation). To celebrate this important exhibition, Andrew Hunter, the AGO's Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art,has organized a series of complementary interventions and installations to extend the dialogue into the AGO's own collection of Canadian art.

“This is a powerful exhibition that is very much about this place and its timeless connection to a distinct world view, one that continues to resonate with Anishinaabe,” said Hunter. “The AGO is situated in the very heart of traditional Anishinaabe territory, and we are honoured to position this exhibition as a catalyst for reimaging our sense of place and community, and to feature the ground-breaking work of a significant group of artists who have lived and work in this area.”

Bonnie Devine, a noted Objibwe artist and educator, will work with Hunter to transform one of the permanent collection galleries while Robert Houle (Saulteaux) will present a new installation entitled Seven Grandfathers in the AGO's Walker Court.

“This exhibition is a welcome opportunity to reconsider, through various political and aesthetic interventions by Anishinaabe artists, how Canadian art history has been traditionally presented at the AGO,” said Devine. “The Anishinaabe have continuously occupied the territory around the Great Lakes for at least 12,000 years, so a survey exhibition of contemporary Anishinaabe art is overdue.”

Organized by the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.

Venue & Address: 
Art Gallery of Ontario 317 Dundas Street West Toronto, Ontario
Website: 
http://www.ago.net/before-and-after-the-horizon-anishinaabe-artists-of-the-great-lakes
Phone: 
416-979-6648