Tak Pham: Theatre of Disjunctions

Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 4:00pm to Sunday, April 3, 2016 - 10:00pm

Theatre of Disjunctions responds to the disappearance of historic architecture in due to socio-political turmoil, inadequate maintenance and negligence. Local artists Lizz Aston, Marina Fathalla, Layne Hinton and Carson Teal help rethink architectural preservation through curatorial practice. The exhibition re-examines the relationship between art and politics during an investigation of Toronto theatre architecture and its contribution to the city’s gentrification effort in early 1990s. The exhibition stages a comprehensive experience speaking to the conditions of people who are marginalized and rejected in the history of modernization. Each artwork contemplates and reflects different lines of narrative in the collective historical psyche inside the gallery’s adaptive-reused architecture of the former transit loop.

Special Programming:

Vernissage, Tuesday March 29th, 6pm – 9pm

Movie Screening: “The Artist” and panel discussion “Obsolescence: Performing in the Age of Technology”, Friday April 1st, 6pm – 9pm
Moderator: Cydney Langill, Jennifer Wigmore
Following a public screen of the French romantic comedy-drama “The Artist” (2011), moderators Cydney Langill and Jennifer will lead a panel discussion “Obsolescence: Performing in the Age of Technology.”

Curatorial Tour, Saturday April 2nd, 12pm – 1pm
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Theatre of Disjunctions is made possible by the financial support from the Graduate Studies Office at OCAD University.

Venue & Address: 
Open Space Gallery, 49 McCaul Street
Email: 
pp14me@student.ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000
Tak Pham: Theatre of Disjunctions
Keywords: 

Ways of Being Here - Barbora Raceviciute MFA thesis exhibition

Ways of Being Here
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 11:00pm to Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:00pm

Ways of Being Here

An OCAD University MFA thesis exhibition in the Criticism and Curatorial Practice program

Featuring artists Abedar Kamgari, Rah, and Alize Zorlutuna
Curated by Barbora Racevičiūtė

March 2th – March 12th, 2016

Open Space Gallery @ 49 McCaul Street
Opening Reception, Wednesday March 2th, 6pm – 9pm

Ways of Being Here asks how contemporary art practice explores the implications of moving from a homeland to another country — of establishing oneself in relation to multiple places at once. It brings together the work of Abedar Kamgari, Rah, and Alize Zorlutuna, three multi-disciplinary artists who are actively engaged with their immigrant histories and presents. The work showcased in the exhibition considers the making of identity in, through, and against the places, cities, and nations in which we live.

Special Programming

Friday March 4th, 12pm – 1pm
Rah invites the community to participate in an interactive traditional Iranian dance workshop. Rah’s character Fatimeh will be teaching the audience poses,movements, and gestures of the dance. The performance promises to be fun, high energy, and Fatimeh’s creative spirit will engage the public to dance with her. A Q&A with the artist will follow

Artist Talk, Tuesday March 8th, 3pm – 4pm
Please join us for a talk with artists Abedar Kamgari and Alize Zorlutuna, moderated by curator Barbora Racevičiūtė.

Curatorial Tour, Saturday March 12th, 12pm – 1pm
Please join us for a lunch time curatorial tour, organized in conjunction with the #trending: Mobilizing Art and Culture conference!

Venue & Address: 
Open Space Gallery, 49 McCaul Street
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/graduate-studies.htm
Email: 
br14lh@student.ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000
Cost: 
FREE
Ways of Being Here - Barbora Raceviciute MFA thesis exhibition
Keywords: 

ONSITE/INSIGHT/INCITE: Reinventing Public Galleries to Affect Change

Image of ONSITE/INSIGHT/INCITE panel participants
Image of ONSITE/INSIGHT/INCITE panel participants
Friday, February 12, 2016 - 5:00am

Dr. Andrea Fatona, Graduate Program Director of our Criticism and Curatorial Practice Program and Elisha Lim, MFA (2017) Candidate, spoke at a panel on making public and private galleries more inclusive.

On January 23, 2016, OCAD University's professional gallery presented a panel discussion and workshop entitled: ONSITE/INSIGHT/INCITE: Reinventing Public Galleries to Affect Change.

Dr. Fatona provided an historic overview of the context to institutional arts racial inclusion, through arts council grant programs and the Massey-Levesque report.

Lim spoke about her solution to gallery diversity, e.g. hiring Black, Indigenous and People of Colour to senior staff positions in galleries, art schools and arts organizations. They suggested removing "formal art degrees" from the list of qualifications in art job postings, and focusing instead on passion and a variety of experiences. They concluded with a list of the low-rank art positions that potential employers can look to find talented, committed, skillful people of colour, suitable to more senior positions.

The panel also include Irene Loughlin, a Canadian performance artist and writer and was moderated by Onsite Curator, Lisa Deanne Smith.

Photo credit: Ju-Hye Ahn.

More about the Criticism and Curatorial Practice Program: www.ocadu.ca/academics/graduate-studies/criticism-and-curatorial-practic...

More about the Event: www2.ocadu.ca/event/12253/onsiteinsightincite-reinventing-public-galleries-to-affect-change

 

 

AWARDS -MFA Thesis Exhibition

Five Miss Toronto Pageant Girls in Bathing suits - 1926.
Friday, March 4, 2016 - 3:00pm to Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 11:00pm

AWARDS  MFA Thesis Exhibition

Curated by Jennifer Lorraine Fraser

Awards is an MFA Thesis exhibition curated by Jennifer Lorraine Fraser from March 4-10, and falls on International Women's day March 8th, 2016. Awards is held in the OCAD University Graduate Gallery. 205 Richmond St. West, Ground Floor.

Artists featured in Awards include:

Ana Cop - http://anacop.com/

Anna Copa Cabanna - http://www.annacopacabanna.com/

Britta Fluevog - http://brittafluevog.blogspot.ca/

Gillian Dykeman - http://www.gilliandykeman.com/

Jamey Braden - http://jameybvm.com/

Kristina Guison - http://kristinaguison.net/

Paddy Jane - http://www.fiftytwopinups.com/

Rene Vandenbrink - http://renevandenbrink.com/home.html

This curatorial project reconceptualises the lives of women in Toronto incarcerated under the Female Refuges Act (FRA). The project offers in depth research into the period following the revision of the FRA, (1919) outlining the systemic oppression young women faced when they were asylumed against their wills, and how they were disciplined for reasons such as feeblemindedness, deviance and incorrigibility. Historical information of their incarceration is difficult to attain, lacking or non-existent. However, former inmate Velma Demerson documents her confinement in the 2002 publication Incorrigible. This project utilizes the subsequent research that arose from Demerson’s personal narrative of incarceration, and highlights the lack of supporting documentation of the exploitation and innocence of young women.

By revealing this lack, the resulting exhibition, Awards, incorporates archival reproductions with contemporary artistic practice used to inform the limited presences remaining in their absences; it raises general questions about societal expectations of women and of their disciplining.

Included, are 8 artists, all of which have been chosen to respond to the research I have conducted. The artists are: Ana Čop, Anna Copa Cabanna, Britta Fluevlog, Gillian Dykeman, Jamey Braden, Kristina Guison, Paddy Jane, and Rene Vandenbrink. Awards, is a co-construction of research, contemplation and response to the history of women being unethically incarcerated; their subsequent forced labour within asylums, and their lifestyle choices which led to their incarceration.

For more details visit Jennifer Lorraine Fraser's AWARDS facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1548514755473322/?fref=nf

The Event on the OCADU Graduate Gallery Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/events/535856556597191/

Venue & Address: 
OCADU Graduate Gallery 205 Richmond Street West, Ground floor
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/gallery/graduate-gallery
Email: 
gradgallery@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
(416) 977 6000 x423
Awards Poster. Curated By Jennifer Lorraine Fraser
Keywords: 

OCAD University stands out at Art Toronto

Painting of a female face with purple hair and striped shirt
Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 4:45pm

You couldn’t miss them: A dozen OCAD U students and alumni displayed their works at a prime location at Art Toronto this year – just inside the front doors. Considered Canada’s international modern and contemporary art fair, the event at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre from October 23 to 26 drew thousands of gallerists, collectors and art lovers who couldn’t help but notice OCAD U’s showcase.

Participation in the art fair was made possible by a generous donation from Ada Slaight to the Contemporary Painting and Print Media Program, with the booth curatorial team led by the Ada Slaight Chair of Contemporary Painting and Print Media, Natalie Waldburger.

Criticism and Curatorial Practice graduate students Tak Pham and Barbora Raceviciute curated the exhibition booth with undergrads Janine Arellano and Hannah Zanovello. The exhibit included the work of Michael Badour, Cat Bleumke, Atleigh Homma, Maxwell Hyett, Rebecca Ladds, Sarah Letovsky, Kesang Nanglu, Kristen Plewes, Molly Prime, Alex R. M. Thompson, Kelly Uyeda and Jennifer Wigmore. The artists in the OCAD U booth collectively sold more than $12,000 work of art over the weekend, including alumna Sarah Letovsky, who sold a work to a prominent New York Gallery.

CADN + CCP Colloquium

Monday, October 5, 2015 - 1:00pm to Tuesday, October 6, 2015 - 6:15pm

2nd-year MA and MFA candidates in the Criticism and Curatorial Practice and Contemporary Art, New Media, and Design Histories graduate programs will be presenting their thesis proposals in a colloquium on October 5th and 6th, 2015. This is an important milestone for graduate students as it will give them the opportunity present their research publically and hear feedback on their work from their advisors and peers. Each student will present for 15 minutes, followed by a 15-minute Q&A period.

Location: Graduate Gallery, 205 Richmond (level G)
Time: 9:00 – 3:30 on October 5, 9:00 – 2:10 on October 6

Schedule:
MONDAY OCTOBER 5th
9:00 – 9:30: Tak Pham
9:40 – 10:10: Barbora Raceviciute
10:10 – 10:20: BREAK
10:20 – 10:50: Jennifer Fraser
11:00 – 11:30: Cydney Langill
11:40 – 12:10: Treva Pullen
12:10 – 1:00: LUNCH BREAK
1:00 – 1:30: Theresa Slater
1:40 – 2:10: Andrea Ortiz
2:20 – 2:50: Alana Traficante
3:00 – 3:30: Archana Dalmia

TUESDAY OCTOBER 6th
9:30 – 10:00: Mary Callahan Baumstark
10:10 – 10:40: Alina Tigountsova
10:40 – 11:00: BREAK
11:00 – 11:30: Erica Manetta
11:40 – 1:00: LUNCH BREAK
1:00 – 1:30: Katie Connell
1:40 – 2:10: Ryan Pechnick (IAMD student)

Venue & Address: 
Graduate Gallery, 205 Richmond Street West, Level G
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/graduate-studies.htm
Email: 
dbank@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 X4366
Cost: 
Free

OCAD University professor joins Black Canadian curators and critics at Biennale di Venezia

Black Canadian curators and critics (and international colleagues) in Venice
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 1:30pm

Criticism and Curatorial Practice professor Andrea Fatona joined other leading Black Canadian curators and critics on a unique four-day preview of the 56th Biennale di Venezia – one of the world’s most prestigious art shows.

Called Expanded Context, the expedition to Venice sought, Fatona explains, “to raise the profile of Black Canadians on the international art scene and to engage with global diasporic networks.” To that end, Fatona and her colleagues toured the Biennale and held meetings with partners from Nigeria’s Centre for Contemporary Art and the United Kingdom’s International Curators Forum.

What struck Fatona in Venice was the sheer number of Black artists included by the show’s artistic director, Okwui Enwezor. “Because of the event’s huge influence in the art world, it was thrilling to experience Enwezor’s inclusion of politics throughout, including discussions of labour, capital and the ongoing effects of colonialism.”

Supported by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council, Expanded Context arose from the ground-breaking State of Blackness conference Fatona convened in February 2014. “Travelling to the Biennale was a way to further our State of Blackness discussions,” Fatona says. Fatona is planning an international symposium in Toronto in fall 2015 to keep the momentum going, and she is looking towards another overseas research-and-networking group trip in 2017, when all the major European biennial art shows will occur in the same year.

Searching For No End In Sight...

SEARCHING FOR NO END IN SIGHT... Exhibition Poster
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 4:00am to Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 4:00am

An OCAD U Criticism and Curatorial Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition by Natasha Peterson

Featuring the work of:
PARASTOO ANOUSHAHPOUR
and photographs from the ARCHIVE OF MODERN CONFLICT TORONTO

SEARCHING FOR NO END IN SIGHT . . . is an exhibition that begins with a line -- the horizon. As a fundamental feature of the landscape, the horizon conjures up feelings of infiniteness, longing, and even the sublime. In family snapshots, it marks a division between earth and sky, and provides a backdrop for scenes of leisure and informal congregation. This exhibition examines the horizon as a metaphorical subject and a framing device used by anonymous amateur photographers. By comparing found photographs with numerous others from the Archive of Modern Conflict Toronto, as well as the artwork of Parastoo Anoushahpour, the horizon is reconsidered as a subject with spatial and affective resonances.

Curated by Natasha Peterson

EXHIBITION: 17-21 March 2015, 12-5PM

RECEPTION: 19 March 2015, 7-9PM

Venue & Address: 
Graduate Gallery - 205 Richmond Street West
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/exhibitions/graduate-gallery/current.htm
Email: 
natasha.c.peterson@gmail.com
Cost: 
Free

Searching For No End In Sight...

Poster with a gun target
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 4:00pm to Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 9:00pm

SEARCHING FOR NO END IN SIGHT. . .
An OCAD U Criticism and Curatorial Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition.

Featuring the work of:
PARASTOO ANOUSHAHPOUR
and photographs from the ARCHIVE OF MODERN CONFLICT TORONTO

SEARCHING FOR NO END IN SIGHT . . . is an exhibition that begins with a line -- the horizon. As a fundamental feature of the landscape, the horizon conjures up feelings of infiniteness, longing, and even the sublime. In family snapshots, it marks a division between earth and sky, and provides a backdrop for scenes of leisure and informal congregation. This exhibition examines the horizon as a metaphorical subject and a framing device used by anonymous amateur photographers. By comparing found photographs with numerous others from the Archive of Modern Conflict Toronto, as well as the artwork of Parastoo Anoushahpour, the horizon is reconsidered as a subject with spatial and affective resonances.

Curated by Natasha Peterson

EXHIBITION: 17-21 March 2015, 12-5PM
RECEPTION: 19 March 2015, 7-9PM

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U Graduate Gallery, 205 Richmond Street West, Level G
Website: 
http://www.ocadu.ca/exhibitions/graduate-gallery.htm
Email: 
np13kh@student.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
Poster with a gun target
Keywords: 

Nebularity

Sculpture of two faces
Thursday, March 5, 2015 - 5:00am to Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 4:00am

An OCADU Criticism and Curatorial Practice MFA Thesis Exhibition

Opening March 5, 7 – 9 p.m.

The pervasiveness of the abject in contemporary art proves that transgression has more to offer than short-lived shock value. For thirty years the abject has continued in the mainstream art sphere as a perturbing thematic that threatens mortality and incorporates bodily fluids. While other types of transgressive art have become accepted and even institutionalized, the presence of abject art remains undertheorized. The question endures: why is abject art still so provocative?

Nebularity presents an updated lens to reconsider the experience and display of abject art in the twenty-first century. Three contemporary artists – Louis Fortier, Jesika Joy, and Kim Stanford – employ abject tendencies that elicit emotional engagement and strong reactions. By confusing boundaries, imposing intimacy, and deteriorating conventional forms, these works demonstrate that the abject is not just another genre of art but a practice of continually challenging structures of subjectivity and knowledge.

Jesika Joy is a Toronto-based video artist who works with deliberately confrontational sexualized scenarios. With a PhD in social and political thought, Joy addresses feminine issues and bodily politics in an unapologetic graphic manner. Her works both repel and attract by drawing viewers into aggressive portrayals of intimate, abject activities.

Montreal-based Louis Fortier engages with malleable wax-like materials to create abject sculptures of facial and body parts. While gesturing towards Greco-Roman portraiture, the mutated forms are at once sensual, tactile, carnal and grotesque. The morphing shapes hint at alien forces that play with human flesh in impossible and monstrous ways.

Kim Stanford is a Toronto-based artist who creates unnerving three-dimensional sculptures and engulfing installations. Though the materials bear a familiar domesticity, they typically are things used and discarded, and so become abject through unnatural accumulation. Her aesthetic carries undertones of ambiguity, vulnerability and the uncanny.

Venue & Address: 
60 McCaul St. (Brinks Building), Toronto
Email: 
<p>mattkyba@gmail.com</p>
Phone: 
<p>647 464 7961</p>
Keywords: 

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